Vladimir Dolgikh

Vladimir Ivanovich Dolgikh (Russian: Владимир Иванович Долгих; born 5 December 1924) is a Russian politician who was head of the Metallurgical Department of the Central Committee Secretariat of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. He was a candidate member (non-voting) of the Politburo from 1982 to 1988.

Vladimir Dolgikh
Владимир Долгих
Vladimir Dolgikh 2016
Senator from Moscow
In office
13 September 2013 – 19 September 2018
Preceded byYury Roslyak
Succeeded byVladimir Kozhin
Candidate member of the 26th, 27th Politburo
In office
24 May 1982 – 30 September 1988
Head of the Metallurgical Department of the Central Committee
In office
1976–1984
Member of the 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th Secretariat
In office
18 December 1972 – 30 September 1988
Personal details
Born5 December 1924 (age 94)
Ilansky, Yeniseysk Governorate, Soviet Union
NationalitySoviet and Russian
Political partyCommunist Party of the Soviet Union
ProfessionCivil servant
AwardsHero of Socialist Labor medal.png Hero of Socialist Labor medal.png
Orden for Service I.png Orden for Service IV.png Orden of Friendship.png
Order of Lenin ribbon bar.png Order of Lenin ribbon bar.png Order of Lenin ribbon bar.png Order of Lenin ribbon bar.png
Order of Lenin ribbon bar.png Order of Lenin ribbon bar.png Order gpw1 rib.png Order gpw1 rib.png

Career

Dolgikh's early career involved various industrial and engineering management positions in Krasnoyarsk and Norilsk. In 1969 he became the First Secretary of the Krasnoyarsk Krai Committee of the CPSU. He was made a member of the CPSU Central Committee in 1971.[1] In 1972 he became a Secretary of the Central Committee.[2]

Dolgikh was elected as a candidate member of the Politburo in May 1982, at the same plenum of the Central Committee of the CPSU that made Yuri Andropov a Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.[3] Dolgikh retired from all his CPSU leadership positions in September 1988.[4]

Dolgikh received the Candidate of Sciences degree from the Irkutsk Mining-Metallurgical Institute.[2]

He was awarded two Hero of Socialist Labour titles, six Orders of Lenin and many other awards.

Since 2011 he has been a State Duma deputy for United Russia. In September 2013 the mayor of Moscow, Sergey Sobyanin, appointed him as representative of the local government in the Federation Council.

Honours and awards

References

  1. ^ Martin McCauley, Who's Who in Russia Since 1900, Routledge, 1997, ISBN 0-415-13898-1; p. 74
  2. ^ a b David A. Law Russian civilization, MSS Information Corp., New York, 1975; p. 240
  3. ^ Stephen White, After Gorbachev, Cambridge University Press, 1993, ISBN 0-521-45264-3; p. 9
  4. ^ White, p. 20

External links

2011–2013 Russian protests

The 2011–2013 Russian protests (which some English language media referred to as the Snow Revolution) began in 2011 (as protests against the 2011 Russian legislative election results) and continued into 2012 and 2013. The protests were motivated by claims by Russian and foreign journalists, political activists and members of the public that the election process was flawed. The Central Election Commission of Russia stated that only 11.5% of official reports of fraud could be confirmed as true.On 10 December 2011, after a week of small-scale demonstrations, Russia saw some of the biggest protests in Moscow since the 1990s. The focus of the protests have been the ruling party, United Russia, and its leader Vladimir Putin, the current president, previous prime minister, and previous two-term president, who announced his intention to run again for President in 2012. Another round of large protests took place on 24 December 2011. These protests were named "For Fair Elections" (Russian: За честные выборы) and their organizers set up the movement of the same name. By this time, the "For Fair Elections" protesters had coalesced into five main points: freedom for political prisoners; annulment of the election results; the resignation of Vladimir Churov (head of the election commission) and the opening of an official investigation into vote fraud; registration of opposition parties and new democratic legislation on parties and elections, as well as new democratic and open elections.Initial protest actions, organized by the leaders of the Russian opposition parties and non-systemic opposition sparked fear in some quarters of a colour revolution in Russia, and a number of counter-protests and rallies in support of the government were held. On the first days following the election, Putin and United Russia were supported by rallies of two youth organizations, the government-organized \Nashi and United Russia's Young Guard. On 24 December Sergey Kurginyan organised the first protest against what was viewed as "orange" protesters in Moscow, though the protest also supported the slogan "For Fair Elections". On 4 February 2012, more protests and pro-government rallies were held throughout the country. The largest two events were in Moscow: the "anti-Orange protest" (alluding to the Orange Revolution in Ukraine, the most widely known color revolution to Russians), aimed against "orangism", "collapse of the country", "perestroika" and "revolution", the largest protest action of all the protests so far according to the police; and another "For Fair Elections" protest, larger than the previous ones according to the police.On 6 May 2012, protests took place in Moscow the day before Putin's inauguration as President for his third term. Some called for the inauguration to be scrapped. The protests were marred by violence between the protesters and the police. About 400 protesters were arrested, including Alexei Navalny, Boris Nemtsov and Sergei Udaltsov and 80 were injured. On the day of the inauguration, 7 May, at least 120 protesters were arrested in Moscow.In June 2012, laws were enacted which set strict boundaries on protests and imposed heavy penalties for unauthorized actions. As of January 2013, interviews by Ellen Barry of The New York Times of working class elements which had supported the protests revealed an atmosphere of intimidation, discouragement, and alienation.

24th Secretariat of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 24th Secretariat of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 24th Central Committee in the aftermath of the 24th Congress.

25th Secretariat of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 25th Secretariat of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 25th Central Committee in the aftermath of the 25th Congress.

26th Politburo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 26th Politburo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 26th Central Committee in the aftermath of the 26th Congress.

26th Secretariat of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 26th Secretariat of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 26th Central Committee in the aftermath of the 26th Congress.

27th Politburo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 27th Politburo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 1st Plenary Session of the 27th Central Committee in the aftermath of the 27th Congress.

27th Secretariat of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 27th Secretariat of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 1st Plenary Session of the 27th Central Committee in the aftermath of the 27th Congress.

6th State Duma

The State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation the 6th convocation (Russian: Государственная Дума Федерального Собрания Российской Федерации VI созыва) is the former convocation of the legislative branch of the State Duma, Lower House of the Russian Parliament. The 6th convocation meets at the State Duma building in Moscow, having begun its term on December 21, 2011 following the last session of the 5th State Duma. The term of office expired October 5, 2016, when the next parliamentary elections.

The 6th State Duma's composition was based upon the results of the 2011 parliamentary election. Of the seven parties participating in the elections, only four were able to overcome the 7% election threshold to gain representation based upon the proportional representation system.

Central Committee elected by the 24th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 24th Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 24th Congress, and was in session from 1971 until 1976. It elected, at its 1st Plenary Session, the 24th Politburo, the 24th Secretariat and the 24th Party Control Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Central Committee elected by the 25th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 25th Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 25th Congress, and was in session from 1976 until 1981. It elected, at its 1st Plenary Session, the 25th Politburo, the 25th Secretariat and the 25th Party Control Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Central Committee elected by the 26th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 26th Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 26th Congress, and was in session from 1981 until 1986. It elected, at its 1st Plenary Session, the 26th Politburo, the 26th Secretariat and the 26th Party Control Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was the executive leadership of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, acting between sessions of Congress. According to own party statutes, the committee directed all party and governmental activities. Its members were elected by the Party Congress.

During Vladimir Lenin's leadership of the Communist Party, the Central Committee functioned as the highest party authority between Congresses. However, the 8th Party Congress (held in 1919) established the Political Bureau (Politburo) to respond to questions needing immediate responses. Some delegates objected to the establishment of the Politburo, and in response, the Politburo became responsible to the Central Committee, and Central Committee members could participate in Politburo sessions with a consultative voice, but could not vote unless they were members. Following Lenin's death in January 1924, Joseph Stalin gradually increased his power in the Communist Party through the office of General Secretary of the Central Committee, the leading Secretary of the Secretariat. With Stalin's takeover, the role of the Central Committee was eclipsed by the Politburo, which consisted of a small clique of loyal Stalinists.

By the time of Stalin's death in 1953, the Central Committee had become largely a symbolic organ that was responsible to the Politburo, and not the other way around. The death of Stalin revitalised the Central Committee, and it became an important institution during the power struggle to succeed Stalin. Following Nikita Khrushchev's accession to power, the Central Committee still played a leading role; it overturned the Politburo's decision to remove Khrushchev from office in 1957. In 1964 the Central Committee ousted Khrushchev from power and elected Leonid Brezhnev as First Secretary. The Central Committee was an important organ in the beginning of Brezhnev's rule, but lost effective power to the Politburo. From then on, until the era of Mikhail Gorbachev (General Secretary from 1985 to 1991), the Central Committee played a minor role in the running of the party and state – the Politburo operated as the highest political organ in the Soviet Union.

Dolgikh

Dolgikh (Russian: Долгих, from долгий meaning long) is a gender-neutral Russian surname of Siberian origin. It may refer to

Maria Dolgikh (born 1987), Russian table tennis player

Vladimir Dolgikh (born 1924), Russian politician

Father of the House

Father of the House is a title that has been traditionally bestowed, unofficially, on certain members of some legislatures, most notably the House of Commons in the United Kingdom. In some legislatures the title refers to the longest continuously-serving member, while in others it refers to the oldest member. Recently, the title Mother of the House or Mother of Parliament has also been used, although the usage varies between countries; it is simply the female alternative to Father of the House, being applied when the relevant member is a woman.

Jubilee Medal "65 Years of Victory in the Great Patriotic War 1941–1945"

The Jubilee Medal "65 Years of Victory in the Great Patriotic War 1941–1945" (Russian: Юбилейная медаль «65 лет Победы в Великой Отечественной войне 1941–1945 гг.») is a state commemorative medal of the Russian Federation. It was established on March 4, 2009 by Presidential Decree № 238 to denote the 65th anniversary of the 1945 victory over Nazi Germany.

Jubilee Medal "In Commemoration of the 100th Anniversary of the Birth of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin"

The Jubilee Medal "In Commemoration of the 100th Anniversary of the Birth of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin" (Russian: Юбилейная медаль В ознаменование 100-летия со дня рождения Владимира Ильича Ленина») was a state commemorative medal of the Soviet Union established by decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet on November 5, 1969 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the birth of Vladimir Lenin. Its statute was amended on July 18, 1980 by decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet. It was awarded to eminent members of Soviet society, the military leadership and foreign members of the international communist and labour movements.

List of Chairmen of the State Duma

This page contains the list of Chairmen of the State Duma of Russia.

The post of Chairman of the State Duma existed in Russia two times. First time in the Russian Empire from 1906 to 1917, during this period the post of Chairman was occupied by 5 people. The second time, in the Russian Federation since 1993.

By party affiliation are:

One: Agrarian Party, Communist Party and Party of Russia's Rebirth

Two: Constitutional Democratic Party

Three: Union of October 17 and United RussiaCurrent Chairman Vyacheslav Volodin was elected October 5, 2016.

List of people from Krasnoyarsk

This is a list of notable people who were born or have lived in Krasnoyarsk, Russia.

Vladimir Kozhin (businessman)

Vladimir Igorevich Kozhin (Russian: Влади́мир И́горевич Ко́жин, born February 28, 1959 in Troitsk, Chelyabinsk Oblast, Soviet Union) is a Russian businessman and politician. Senator from Moscow since 2018. Previously he was an Aide to the President of Russia and head of the Control Directorate of the Presidential Administration of Russia.

Events (1964–1982)
Events (1982–1985)
Politburo members
Leaders
Governments
National economy
Brezhnev's family

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