Virginia Halas McCaskey

Virginia Halas McCaskey (born January 5, 1923) is the principal owner of the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. She is the eldest child of former Bears coach and owner George Halas, who left the team to his daughter upon his death in 1983, and Minnie Bushing Halas.[2] After the death of Buffalo Bills owner Ralph Wilson in March 2014, she became the oldest owner in the NFL.[3]

Her formal title within the Bears organization is secretary of the board of directors.[4] However, she is empowered to speak for the interests of her children and grandchildren, effectively giving her 80% ownership of the team.[5]

Virginia Halas McCaskey
BornJanuary 5, 1923 (age 96)
Alma materDrexel University
Net worthIncreaseUS$2.4 billion (2018)[1]
Spouse(s)
Ed McCaskey
(m. 1943; died 2003)
ChildrenMichael
George
RelativesGeorge Halas Jr. (brother)

Football career
Chicago Bears
Position:Principal owner
Career history
As executive:
  • Chicago Bears (1983–present)
    Principal owner & corporate secretary
Career highlights and awards

Career

McCaskey's brother, George "Mugs" Halas Jr., was the heir apparent for the franchise, but he died suddenly of a heart attack in 1979. As a result, when her father died, McCaskey inherited an incredible nucleus of a team and was the owner when the Bears won Super Bowl XX.[6] However, the team struggled in the 1990s and, since 1999 she has been a very hands-off owner.[7] Her son Michael McCaskey was team president from 1983 to 1999 and was chairman of the board until May 6, 2011, when his brother George McCaskey assumed the position.[8] George McCaskey had been the Bears ticket office director since 1991.[9] Team president Ted Phillips currently has operational control; when he became team president, it marked the first time in the team's history that a Halas or McCaskey had not held that title.[10]

Halas's husband, Ed McCaskey, was previously the chairman and treasurer of the Bears. Although McCaskey never had any official share of ownership, he acted as co-owner alongside his wife before his death in 2003.[11]

On January 21, 2007, she accepted the NFC Championship trophy, which bears her father's name. She called it "her happiest day so far", after the Bears had beaten the New Orleans Saints to earn a trip to Super Bowl XLI.[12]

McCaskey is one of a handful of female NFL owners, including Martha Firestone Ford (Detroit Lions), Amy Adams Strunk (Tennessee Titans), Kim Pegula (Buffalo Bills), Carol Davis (Oakland Raiders), Denise DeBartolo York (San Francisco 49ers), Gayle Benson (New Orleans Saints), Janice McNair (Houston Texans), Jody Allen (Seattle Seahawks), and Dee Haslam (Cleveland Browns).

References

  1. ^ https://www.nbcchicago.com/blogs/grizzly-detail/chicago-bears-nfl-forbes-magazine-3-billion-493883341.html
  2. ^ Sean Jensen, "Heirs and Bears: The mysterious McCaskeys", Chicago Sun-Times, April 1, 2010.
  3. ^ Vergara, Andre. "Billionaire Girls' Club: 4 of sports' richest team owners are women". FoxSports.com. Fox Sports Interactive Media, LLC. Retrieved August 26, 2018.
  4. ^ "Front Office: Chicago Bears". Chicagobears.com. Retrieved August 26, 2018.
  5. ^ Wertheim, Jon. "The Family Ownership Dramas That Roil the NFL". SI.com. Time, Inc. Retrieved August 26, 2018.
  6. ^ Sessler, Marc. "Virginia McCaskey 'pissed off' with struggling Bears". NFL.com. Retrieved August 26, 2018.
  7. ^ "Virginia Halas-McCaskey-Chicago Bears". SI.com. Retrieved August 26, 2018.
  8. ^ Gano, Rick. "Michael McCaskey to Retire as Bears Chairman". Boston.com. Associated Press. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  9. ^ Brad Briggs, "Addressing issues: A new McCaskey takes the helm" Archived November 1, 2011, at the Wayback Machine, Chicago Tribune, May 6, 2011.
  10. ^ "Ted Phillips-President and CEO". ChicagoBears.com. Retrieved August 26, 2018.
  11. ^ Warren, James. "It`s 4th Down For Halas Heirs In Family Feud". ChicagoTribune.com. Retrieved August 26, 2018.
  12. ^ Fusfeld, Adam. "Meet the 88-year-Old Grandmother Who's One Win Away From the Super Bowl". BusinessInsider.com. Business Insider. Retrieved August 26, 2018.
1983 Chicago Bears season

The 1983 Chicago Bears season was their 64th regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–8 record under second year head coach Mike Ditka, but missed postseason play. Jim McMahon was the quarterback, who completed 175 of 295 pass attempts. The Bears 1983 NFL Draft class was ranked #3 in NFL Top 10's greatest draft classes.

1984 Chicago Bears season

The 1984 Chicago Bears season was their 65th regular season and 15th post-season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 10–6 record, earning them a spot in the NFL playoffs. The Bears went on to lose in the NFC Championship Game 23–0 to the eventual Super Bowl Champion San Francisco 49ers.

The Bears opened their 1984 training camp in a new location, Platteville, Wisconsin as head coach Mike Ditka needed his team to get away from any distractions they might face at home. The team was on the verge of discovering a group of young leaders for the first time, and began to show the dominating defense that would emerge in full the following season, and pushed much farther than anyone expected them to go.

Chicago opened the season by routing the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 34–14. In Week Two, they shut out the Denver Broncos 27–0 behind a huge day from star running back Walter Payton. This game featured a famous image from Payton's career: a 50+ yard run down the sideline, led by 2nd-year guard Mark Bortz, an 8th round draft pick that was converted from defensive tackle.

In Week Three, they were without the services of starting quarterback Jim McMahon at Green Bay, reserve quarterback Bob Avellini took the reins. Chicago's offense performed poorly, but still managed a 9–7 victory. This contest marked the first meeting between Mike Ditka and Packers head coach Forrest Gregg. It would be a rivalry that would go down in history as arguably the dirtiest era in Chicago-Green Bay football.In Week Four, the Bears' lack of offensive power was evident as they lost to the Seattle Seahawks 38–9. After this loss, Ditka cut Avellini. The following week, the Bears lost to the Dallas Cowboys 23–14, bringing their record to 3–2.

On October 7, 1984, Walter Payton reached a major milestone as he surpassed Jim Brown as the game's all-time leading rusher in yards, he did it in the third quarter of a Week Six home game against the New Orleans Saints. The Bears beat the Saints 20–7. Incidentally, the 1984 Bears ran for the second-most rushing attempts in a season, with 674.In Week Seven, the Bears lost 38–21 to the Cardinals in St. Louis the following week. Sitting at 4–3, the Bears proceeded to win three in a row. They beat Tampa Bay 44–9, then Minnesota Vikings at home, 16–7. Following the Minnesota win came the biggest challenge for the Bears: a showdown with the defending world champion Los Angeles Raiders. The Bears beat the Raiders 17–6, a game that showcased Richard Dent, who collected three sacks against Raiders QB Marc Wilson. Dent would finish with 17.5 sacks, third-most for the season behind Mark Gastineau and Andre Tippett. The Bears would then record 72 sacks, a team record. The Bears' victory was marred by a kidney laceration suffered by Jim McMahon, ending his season.

Six-year veteran QB Steve Fuller had been acquired from the Los Angeles Rams prior to the 1984 season for insurance in case McMahon was injured. The investment paid off, as Fuller guided the Bears to a 2–1 record over the next 3 games. In the third game at Minnesota's new Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Week Thirteen, the team clinched its first NFC Central Division title.

After the Minnesota game, Fuller was injured, and Chicago was faced with another quarterback problem. Ineffective Rusty Lisch replaced the injured Fuller and lost the Week Fourteen game at San Diego, then started the following week against Green Bay at home. Lisch was again ineffective, so Ditka inserted none other than Walter Payton behind center in the shotgun formation. Payton, unsurprisingly, was ineffective as well, and the Bears lost to the Packers 20–14.

Fuller was expected to return by the playoffs, but Ditka did not want to enter the postseason with another loss. The Bears signed 14-year journeyman Greg Landry to start his last NFL game against his previous team, the Detroit Lions, in the season finale. The Bears won 30–13, and were headed to the playoffs for the first time since 1979.

1985 Chicago Bears season

The 1985 Chicago Bears season was their 66th regular season and 16th post-season completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears entered 1985 looking to improve on their 10–6 record from 1984 and advance further than the NFC Championship Game, where they lost to the 15–1 San Francisco 49ers. Not only did the Bears improve on that record, they put together one of the greatest seasons in NFL history.

The Bears won fifteen games, as the 49ers had the year before, and won their first twelve before losing to the Miami Dolphins to deny a perfect season. The Bears' defense was ranked first in the league and only allowed 198 total points (an average of 12.4 points per game). The Bears won the NFC Central Division by seven games over the second place Green Bay Packers and earned the NFC's top seed and home field advantage throughout the playoffs at Soldier Field. In their two playoff games against the New York Giants and Los Angeles Rams, the Bears outscored their opponents 45–0 and became the first team to record back-to-back playoff shutouts. Then, in Super Bowl XX in New Orleans against the New England Patriots, the Bears set several more records. First, their 46 points broke the record that had been set by the Los Angeles Raiders in 1984 with 38 and tied by the 49ers the following year. Their 36-point margin of victory topped the 29-point margin of victory that the Raiders had put up in Super Bowl XVIII and stood as a record until the 49ers won Super Bowl XXIV, also in New Orleans, by 45 points over the Denver Broncos. It was the Bears' first NFL World Championship title since 1963.

The 1985 Chicago Bears are one of the few teams to consistently challenge the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins for the unofficial title of the greatest NFL team of all time. In 2007, the 1985 Bears were ranked as the second greatest Super Bowl championship team on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions, ranking behind the 1972 Dolphins. Other sources rate the 1985 Chicago Bears as the greatest NFL team ever.

1986 Chicago Bears season

The 1986 Chicago Bears season was their 67th regular season and 17th post-season completed in the National Football League. The Bears entered the season looking to repeat as Super Bowl champions, as they had won in 1985. Chicago managed to finish 14–2, one game off of their 1985 record of 15–1, and tied the New York Giants for the league’s best record.

After winning the championship in 1985, the Bears seemed like a dynasty in the making. However, quarterback Jim McMahon showed up to training camp 25 pounds overweight – the product of the post-Super Bowl partying he’d partaken in. Nonetheless, he was once again named as the starter. Injuries, however, derailed his season. McMahon played in only six of the team’s first 12 games.

Aided by a strong offensive line, the Bears were once again led on offense by Walter Payton. Payton remained his usual stellar self, posting his 10th and final 1,000-yard season. With McMahon’s poor play, as well as the equally poor play of backups Mike Tomczak, Steve Fuller and Doug Flutie, Payton was the sole spark on offense, which ranked 13th in the NFL.

As had been the case the year before, the Bears were once again led by their explosive defense. Any shortcomings on the offensive side of the ball were more than made up for on the defensive side. They once again were ranked #1 in the NFL. The Bears’ defense became the third defense in the history of the NFL to lead the league in fewest points allowed and fewest total yards allowed for two consecutive seasons. The Bears’ 187 points allowed is the fewest surrendered by any team in the 1980s (other than the strike-shortened 1982 season) – even fewer than the 198 points the Bears allowed in their historic 1985 season.

However, the Bears were not able to recapture their magic from the season before and were bounced from the playoffs in their first game by the Washington Redskins.

1999 Chicago Bears season

The 1999 Chicago Bears season was their 80th regular season completed in the National Football League (NFL). On January 24, Dick Jauron was named head coach. The club posted a 6–10 record under Jauron, who replaced Dave Wannstedt.

Quarterbacks Shane Matthews (1,645), Cade McNown (1,465) and Jim Miller (1,242) combined for 4,352 passing yards during the season, the most in franchise history.

2006 Chicago Bears season

The 2006 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 87th season in the National Football League and 25th post-season completed in the National Football League. The Bears posted a 13–3 regular season record, the best in the NFC, improving on their previous year’s record of 11–5. The Bears retained their NFC North divisional title, and won the National Football Conference Championship title against the New Orleans Saints, on January 21, 2007. The Bears played the Indianapolis Colts at Super Bowl XLI, where they lost 29–17. They finished the 2006 NFL season tied for second in points scored, and third in points allowed.Due to the NFL's scheduling formula the Bears played 6 intra-division games, posting a record of 5–1. Because of rotating cycle scheduling, the Bears matched up against all four teams in the AFC East (going 2–2) and NFC West (going 4–0). In the remaining games, the Bears played the NFC's other reigning division winners, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and New York Giants, posting a record of 2–0. During the entire season, the Bears played 10 games at home, 8 games on the road, and 1 game at a neutral field for the Super Bowl. Including the playoffs and Super Bowl, the Bears finished with a record of 15–4.

Noteworthy football stories for the 2006 season were replacing retired cornerback and kick returner Jerry Azumah, the quarterback controversy between productive but inconsistent and potentially fragile Rex Grossman and veteran free agent Brian Griese, the record setting returns by Devin Hester, Bernard Berrian's breakout season, competition between the Bears' running backs (Cedric Benson and Thomas Jones), and 5th round draft pick Mark Anderson's 12 quarterback sacks as a rookie.

2010 Chicago Bears season

The 2010 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 91st season overall in the National Football League. Coming off a disappointing 7–9 record in the 2009 season and failing to qualify for the NFL playoffs for a third consecutive season, the Bears sought to develop their roster and improve on their record in 2010, particularly their standing in the NFC North. All Bears home games were scheduled to be played at Soldier Field. With their final regular season record at 11–5, the Bears improved drastically on their 2009 record. Their regular season finished with their first playoff appearance since the Super Bowl season of 2006, winning the NFC North division and earning a bye as the NFC's second seed. The Bears won their first game in the Divisional round of the playoffs, defeating the Seattle Seahawks on January 16, 2011, to advance to the NFC Championship game. The Chicago Bears's 2010 season came to an end January 23, 2011 with a 21–14 loss to their longtime rivals and eventual Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers in the NFC Championship Game.

This was the last time the Bears won the NFC North and appeared in the postseason until 2018.

2019 Chicago Bears season

The 2019 Chicago Bears season will be the franchise's 100th season in the National Football League, as well as the second under head coach Matt Nagy. They will attempt to improve upon their 12–4 record from 2018, make the playoffs for the second consecutive season, and break their eight-year playoff win drought.

Amy Adams Strunk

Amy Adams Strunk is an American businesswoman best known for being the daughter of Bud Adams and inheriting a portion of his fortune. She is now controlling owner of the National Football League's Tennessee Titans. Strunk owns one-third of the franchise, with other members of the family owning the remaining two thirds. The team is currently owned under the banner of KSA Industries, which also owns many of Bud Adams' businesses. Before Strunk took over as controlling owner in 2015, that role belonged to her sister, Susie Adams Smith, whose husband Tommy Smith was team president and CEO.

Chicago Bears

The Chicago Bears are a professional American football team based in Chicago, Illinois. The Bears compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. The Bears have won nine NFL Championships, including one Super Bowl, and hold the NFL record for the most enshrinees in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the most retired jersey numbers. The Bears have also recorded more victories than any other NFL franchise.The franchise was founded in Decatur, Illinois, on September 17, 1920, and moved to Chicago in 1921. It is one of only two remaining franchises from the NFL's founding in 1920, along with the Arizona Cardinals, which was originally also in Chicago. The team played home games at Wrigley Field on Chicago's North Side through the 1970 season; they now play at Soldier Field on the Near South Side, next to Lake Michigan. The Bears have a long-standing rivalry with the Green Bay Packers.The team headquarters, Halas Hall, is in the Chicago suburb of Lake Forest, Illinois. The Bears practice at adjoining facilities there during the season. Since 2002, the Bears have held their annual training camp, from late July to mid-August, at Ward Field on the campus of Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais, Illinois.

Chicago Honey Bears

The Chicago Honey Bears were a cheerleading squad for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League during the late 1970s and early 1980s. The group performed at Bears games at Soldier Field, and also at one away game in Tampa Bay Florida with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and their Cheerleaders the Tampa Bay Buccaneers Swashbucklers until Super Bowl XX, which was their final appearance. The Chicago Honey Bears donated numerous hours of service to charities, as well as made guest appearances on T.V, including the Richard Simmons Show, the WGN Jerry Lewis Muscular Dystrophy Telethon and performed and signed autographs at various other events, including at the Great Lakes Naval Station for the Navy Servicemen. They did various ads and posters, including a Kodak film ad, a Chicago Buckingham Fountain Post Card, a Stroh's Beer poster, and a poster of The Chicago Honey Bears official head shots featuring hair and make up by Vidal Sassoon, who was the official hair stylist of the NFL Chicago Honey Bears. Vidal Sassoon , selected Chicago Honey Bear line Captain/ and assistant choreographer Sharon Shackelford to be a hair model and he cut, colored and styled her hair live on the Phil Donahue Show. These examples are just a few of the numerous charities, T.V shows and events that the Honey Bear squad participated in. Aside from the Chicago Honey Bears being dancers and cheerleaders, at the Honey Bear auditions, Cathy Core and a panel of judges, including talent agents, narrowed their search by making the contestants display an additional talent , such as singing, playing instruments, acrobatic abilities or other dance forms and talents, before making their final selections of who would be on the squad each season. They also did modeling , including an incident when a member of the squad appeared topless in a Playboy magazine. After this incident, the Cheerleaders signed contracts that forbade posing nude and also forbade fraternizing with the Chicago Bears Football players except at approved events. After Super Bowl XX the squad was disbanded, and currently, the Bears are one of the six NFL teams that do not have cheerleaders, along with the Buffalo Bills, Cleveland Browns, Green Bay Packers, New York Giants, and the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Gayle Benson

Gayle Marie LaJaunie Bird Benson (born January 26, 1947) is an American billionaire, businesswoman, philanthropist, and sports franchise owner.

Following the death of her husband, Tom Benson, she became principal owner of the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL) and the New Orleans Pelicans of the National Basketball Association (NBA)As heir to the Saints and Pelicans, Benson became the first woman to be the majority shareholder of the voting stock in a NFL and NBA franchise. On December 27, 2014, Tom Benson wrote an e-mail to his daughter and two grandchildren stating he wanted "no further contact with any of you." Gayle Benson, at the time his wife of ten years, was named his heir. After lawsuits were filed in both federal and state courts, Tom Benson was determined to be mentally competent and was allowed to change his estate and leave his third wife, Gayle Benson, ownership of the New Orleans Saints and the New Orleans Pelicans. Benson's daughter, Renee Benson, and his grandchildren, Rita Benson LeBlanc and Ryan Benson LeBlanc filed lawsuits challenging Tom Benson's decision to name Gayle heir to the New Orleans Saints and New Orleans Pelicans. The lawsuit and media portrayed Gayle as a "gold digger."

George Halas

George Stanley Halas Sr. (; February 2, 1895 – October 31, 1983), nicknamed "Papa Bear" and "Mr. Everything", was a player, coach, and owner involved with professional American football. He was the founder, owner, and head coach of the National Football League's Chicago Bears. He was also lesser known as a Major League Baseball player for the New York Yankees.

Halas was one of the co-founders of the National Football League (NFL) in 1920, and in 1963 became one of the first 17 inductees into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

George McCaskey

George Halas McCaskey is the current chairman of the NFL's Chicago Bears, who replaced his brother Michael McCaskey as chairman in 2011.

List of NFL franchise owners

The following is a list of current National Football League franchise owners.

† Majority or plurality owner, rather than outright owner.

‡ Family ownership of club has been passed on/split by descendant(s) of previous owner.Benson, Bidwill, McCaskey, Brown, Ford, Irsay, Hunt, Mara, Davis, Rooney, Glazer, Smith, Spanos, York, and Adams-Strunk represent ownership that has been longer than year listed, as teams have been owned by their families longer than listed.

1 Owner held stake prior to this date.2 Child/heir of original owner of franchise.3 Child/heir of heir of original owner of franchise.4 Public corporation with a grandfathered exception to current NFL ownership rules. The team is governed by a Board of Directors, and Mark H. Murphy represents the team as President and CEO.5 Currently inactive.6 Currently held in trust/estate after death of previous owner.

Denver Broncos: Ellis represents the estate of Pat Bowlen until it can be determined which of Bowlen's five children will inherit the team.

Kansas City Chiefs: Clark Hunt, one of four co-owning siblings (the others being Lamar Hunt Jr., Daniel Hunt and Sharon Munson), represents the team in league affairs.

Seattle Seahawks: Allen represents the estate of her deceased brother Paul Allen, who had no immediate next of kin. The franchise will be sold in the long-term.

New York Jets: Christopher Johnson is acting owner due to Robert's appointment as United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom.

Tampa Bay Buccanners: Bryan Glazer represents the four co-owning siblings, including Edward Glazer, Joel Glazer and Darcie Kassewitz.

Tennessee Titans: Amy Strunk represents the five co-owning siblings -- two sisters (Smith), and the widow of their brother (Lewis), and his sons (the Adams brothers), all the children of founding owner Bud Adams.

Martha Firestone Ford

Martha Parke Firestone Ford (born September 16, 1925) is an American businesswoman. She is the principal owner and chairwoman of the Detroit Lions of the National Football League (NFL). Ford is also on the board of the Henry Ford Health System.

McCaskey

McCaskey is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Evan McCaskey, American guitarist that played for the bands Exodus and Blind Illusion.

John G. McCaskey (1874–1924), American oil businessman.

John Piersol McCaskey (1873-1934), an American Politician and Educator.

John P. McCaskey (born 1959), historian of science and philosophy, former computer industry executive.

Michael McCaskey, former Chairman of the Chicago Bears in the National Football League.

Virginia Halas McCaskey (born 1923), principal owner of the Chicago Bears of the National Football League.

Michael McCaskey

Michael McCaskey (born December 1943) was the Chairman of the Chicago Bears in the National Football League from 1999 until 2011.

Franchise
Records
Stadiums
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Retired numbers
Key personnel
Division championships (21)
Conference championships (4)
League championships (9)
Media
Current league affiliations
Seasons (100)
AFC
NFC

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.