Video editing software

Video editing software is an application program which handles the post-production video editing of digital video sequences on a computer non-linear editing system (NLE). It has replaced traditional flatbed celluloid film editing tools and analogue video tape-to-tape online editing[1] machines.

NLE software is typically based on a timeline interface paradigm where sections of moving image video recordings, known as clips, are laid out in sequence and played back. The NLE offers a range of tools for trimming, splicing, cutting and arranging clips across the timeline. As digital NLE systems have advanced their toolset, their role has expanded and most consumer and professional NLE systems alike now include a host of features for colour manipulation, titling and visual effects, as well as tools for editing and mixing audio synchronized with the video image sequence.

Once a project is complete, the NLE system can then be used to export to movie in a variety of formats in context which may range from broadcast tape formats to compressed file formats for the Internet, DVD and mobile devices.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Web video". Video Director. Retrieved 7 June 2013.


https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Video_editing_software&action=edit§ion=2

Avidemux

Avidemux is a free and open-source video editing program designed for video editing and video processing. It is written in C++, and uses either GTK+ or Qt for its user interface.

Clips (software)

Clips is a mobile video editing software application created by Apple Inc. It was released onto the iOS App Store on April 6, 2017 for free. It is only available on 64-bit devices running iOS 10.3 or later. Apple describes it as an app for "making and sharing fun videos with text, effects, graphics, and more."

Comparison of video editing software

This is a comparison of non-linear video editing software applications. See also a more complete list of video editing software.

Final Cut Express

Final Cut Express is a discontinued video editing software suite created by Apple Inc. It was the consumer version of Final Cut Pro and was designed for advanced editing of digital video as well as high-definition video, which was used by many amateur and professional videographers. Final Cut Express was considered a step above iMovie in terms of capabilities, but a step underneath Final Cut Pro and its suite of applications. As of June 21, 2011, Final Cut Express was discontinued, in favor of Final Cut Pro X.

Flowblade

Flowblade Movie Editor is a free and open-source video editing software for Linux.

The project was started by lead developer Janne Liljeblad in 2009 and has been active since. The source code is currently hosted on Github.

Flowblade employs a film-style insert editing model as workflow with similar design approach as Avid. In insert editing clips are generally placed tightly after other clips when they are inserted on the Timeline. Edits are fine tuned by trimming in and out points of clips or by cutting and deleting parts of clips.

Flowblade's builds most of its functionality using media framework MLT. Other MLT video editors are KDEnlive and Shotcut.

Other used libraries include Frei0r effects and LADSPA. Flowblade supports all of the formats supported by FFmpeg or libav (such as QuickTime, AVI, WMV, MPEG, and Flash Video, among others), and also supports 4:3 and 16:9 aspect ratios for both PAL, NTSC and various HD standards, including HDV and AVCHD.

IDVD

iDVD is a discontinued DVD-creation application for Mac OS X produced by Apple Inc. iDVD allows the user to burn QuickTime movies, MP3 music, and digital photos to a DVD that can then be played on a commercial DVD player. It was often considered the last step of Apple's iLife suite, bringing together the results of all of the other iLife apps onto a removable medium.

IMovie

iMovie is a video editing software application sold by Apple Inc. for the Mac and iOS (iPhone, iPad, iPad Mini and iPod Touch). It was originally released in 1999 as a Mac OS 8 application bundled with the first FireWire-enabled consumer Mac model – the iMac DV. Since version 3, iMovie has been a macOS-only application included with the iLife suite of Mac applications. Since 2003, iMovie is included free with all new Mac computers.

iMovie imports video footage to the Mac using either the FireWire interface on most MiniDV format digital video cameras or the computer's USB port. It can also import video and photo files from a hard drive. From there, the user can edit the photos and video clips and add titles, themes, music, and effects, including basic color correction and video enhancement tools and transitions such as fades and slides. iMovie is also available as an app for the iPhone.

Kdenlive

Kdenlive (KDE Non-Linear Video Editor) is a free and open-source video editing software based on the MLT Framework, KDE and Qt. The project was started by Jason Wood in 2002, and is now maintained by a small team of developers.With the release of Kdenlive 15.04.0 it became part of the official KDE project.Kdenlive packages are freely available for Linux, FreeBSD, and Microsoft Windows, and the source code is available under the terms of GNU General Public License version 2 or any later version.

Kino (software)

Kino was a free software GTK+-based video editing software application for Linux and other Unix-like operating systems. The development of Kino was started at the end of 2000 by Dan Dennedy and Arne Schirmacher. The project's aim was: "Easy and reliable DV editing for the Linux desktop with export to many usable formats." The program supported many basic and detailed audio/video editing and assembling tasks.Kino has been included in several Linux distributions, including Debian, Puppy Linux and Ubuntu. BSD ports are also available.

Development towards major feature implementations in Kino was slowed due to the lead developer, Dan Dennedy's inclination towards the development of Media Lovin' Toolkit. Dennedy indicated when he released Kino 1 that he was returning to work on the MLT Framework to support Kdenlive (another Linux non-linear digital video editor), "since its latest version shows much promise".As of August 5, 2013, the official website for Kino indicated that the project is "dead" and that users should try alternative software.

LiVES

LiVES (LiVES Editing System) is a free video editing software and VJ tool, released under the GNU General Public License version 3 or later. There are binary versions available for most popular Linux distributions (including Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, Suse, Gentoo, Slackware, Arch Linux and Mandriva). There are also ports for BSD, and it will run under Solaris and IRIX. It has been compiled under OS X Leopard, but not thoroughly tested on that platform.

List of video editing software

The following is a list of video editing software

The criterion for inclusion in this list is the ability to perform non-linear video editing. Most modern transcoding software supports transcoding a portion of a video clip, which would count as cropping and trimming. However, items in this article have one of the following conditions:

Can perform other non-linear video editing functions such as montage or compositing

Can do the trimming or cropping without transcoding

OpenShot

OpenShot Video Editor is a free and open-source video editor for FreeBSD, Linux, macOS, and Windows. The project was started in August 2008 by Jonathan Thomas, with the objective of providing a stable, free, and friendly to use video editor.OpenShot's core video editing functionality is implemented in a C++ library, libopenshot. OpenShot uses the Qt toolkit and offers a Python API.

Open Movie Editor

Open Movie Editor is a free open-source non-linear video editing and post-processing program for Linux, and included in the Ubuntu and Debian repositories.

Per the website, the design intent is "for basic movie making capabilities. It aims to be powerful enough for the amateur movie artist, yet easy to use." The developer previously had worked on the Cinelerra project, but started the Open Movie Editor project when he started making amateur films because he felt the available software wasn't meeting his needs.A unique feature of Open Movie Editor is that it supports JACK's transport control functionality, which allows you to synchronize sound with other JACK transport-aware apps. This makes it particularly powerful for soundtrack production, for example. Open Movie Editor supports the Frei0r plugin framework for video and audio effects. It uses the Gmerlin audio/video library and primarily exports to QuickTime formats, but will also natively use ffmpeg for rendering options. It natively supports the DV AVI Type 2 format, which is also supported by a number of video editing applications for Windows.Its last release to date is dated 05 Jan 2009. The developer announced 08 Dec 2009 on his blog that he had to "reschedule OME into a lower priority class," putting the project seemingly in the same situation as CineFX and Kino.

Movie editor could also be used as a source for editing videos.

Pitivi

Pitivi (originally called PiTiVi) is an open-source, non-linear video editor for Linux developed by various contributors, with support also available from Collabora. It is licensed under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License. Pitivi is designed to be intuitive video editing software that integrates well in the GNOME desktop environment.

PowerDirector

PowerDirector (Chinese: 威力導演) is a video editing software developed from CyberLink. PowerDirector enables the trimming, joining, and overlaying of clips and effects, also support new standards format, such as the H.265 video and 360-degree footage. PowerDirector runs on Windows 7 through Windows 10, with 64-bit versions recommended.

Shotcut

Shotcut is a free and open-source cross-platform video editing application for FreeBSD, Linux, macOS and Windows. Started in 2011 by Dan Dennedy, Shotcut is developed on the MLT Multimedia Framework, in development since 2004 by the same author.

VideoThang

VideoThang is free video editing software that works on Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Vista. The software has three parts to it which are My Stuff, Edit My Stuff, and My Mix. The software accepts MOV, AVI, MPG, MP4, PNG, WMV, FLV, and MP3. Its official website is now no longer available.

Video editing

Video editing is the manipulation and arrangement of video shots. Video editing is used to structure and present all video information, including films and television shows, video advertisements and video essays. Video editing has been dramatically democratized in recent years by editing software available for personal computers.

Windows Movie Maker

Windows Movie Maker (known as Windows Live Movie Maker for the 2009 and 2011 releases) is a discontinued video editing software by Microsoft. It was a part of Windows Essentials software suite and offered the ability to create and edit videos as well as to publish them on OneDrive, Facebook, Vimeo, YouTube, and Flickr.

Movie Maker was officially discontinued on January 10, 2017 and it is replaced by Microsoft Story Remix which is built in with Microsoft Photos in Windows 10.

Video editing software
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