Victor Rosewater

Victor Rosewater (February 13, 1871 – 1940) was a politician from the U. S. state of Nebraska.

Rosewater was born in Omaha, Nebraska, to Edward and Leah Rosewater . His father was the founder of the Omaha Bee, which ran its first issue the year Victor was born. He was educated at Johns Hopkins University in 1888 and then attended Columbia University, earning a PhD in 1893. He returned to Omaha to work with his father and became managing editor in 1895. He then served as a member of University of Nebraska board of regents 1896–97. He served as a director of the Omaha Public Library 1894–1905 and the Omaha Board of Review in 1903. Rosewater married Katie and had two children, Harriet and Edward Rosewater Jr.

In 1906, Rosewater helped his father run for the U.S. Senate as a Republican, yet unsuccessful against Norris Brown, who was also a Republican. His father died on August 31, 1906 and he took over as managing editor of the Omaha Bee, becoming editor the following year. At the time of his death, Rosewater senior had been involved in plans for launching the American Jewish Committee, and Victor assumed his father's role, becoming a founder of the AJC. He was a Nebraska delegate to the 1908 Republican National Convention and a member of Republican National Committee, 1908–12, serving as its chairman in 1912 and planning its convention that year.

Rosewater later moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he became involved in planning the Sesquicentennial Exposition, which celebrated the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. He continued his newspaper career writing columns for various papers and wrote an unpublished biography on his father.

He died at the age of 69.

Victor Rosewater 001
Victor Rosewater ca. 1900

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Party political offices
Preceded by
John F. Hill
Chairman of the Republican National Committee
1910–1912
Succeeded by
Charles D. Hilles
Charles D. Hilles

Charles Dewey Hilles (June 23, 1867 – August 27, 1949) was a politician from the U. S. state of New York.

Hilles was born in Belmont County, Ohio to Samuel and Elizabeth (Lee) Hilles. In 1896 he married Dollie Bell Whiley. He was also a member of Loyal Legion and the Republican Party .

From 1880 to 1902, he was financial officer and superintendent of the Boys' Industrial School of Ohio. From 1902 to 1909 he was superintendent of the New York Juvenile Asylum (now Children's Village), becoming president of this institution. He was Assistant Secretary of the United States Treasury in 1909, but resigned in 1911 to become private secretary to U. S. President William H. Taft where he served until 1912.He then served as chairman of the Republican National Committee from 1912-16. He was a New York delegate to the Republican National Conventions of 1916, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932 and 1940. He served as a regular member of the RNC from New York 1924-38. In 1933 he was a delegate to the New York convention to ratify the 21st Amendment which ended prohibition.

In 1949 Hilles suffered a stroke and died two months later in Speonk, New York. His wife also died the same year. His remains were cremated.

Edward Rosewater

Edward Rosewater, born Edward Rosenwasser, (January 21, 1841 – August 30, 1906) was a Republican Party politician and newspaper editor in Omaha, Nebraska. Rosewater had a reputation for being "aggressive and controversial", and was influential in the Nebraska state Republican Party.

History of American newspapers

The history of American newspapers begins in the early 18th century with the publication of the first colonial newspapers. American newspapers began as modest affairs—a sideline for printers. They became a political force in the campaign for American independence. Following independence the first article of U.S. Constitution guaranteed freedom of the press. The U.S. Postal Service Act of 1792 provided substantial subsidies: Newspapers were delivered up to 100 miles for a penny and beyond for 1.5 cents, when first class postage ranged from six cents to a quarter.

The American press grew rapidly during the First Party System (1790s-1810s) when both parties sponsored papers to reach their loyal partisans. From the 1830s onward, the Penny press began to play a major role in American journalism. Technological advancements such as the telegraph and faster printing presses in the 1840s also helped to expand the press of the nation as it experienced rapid economic and demographic growth. Editors typically became the local party spokesman, and hard-hitting editorials were widely reprinted.

By 1900 major newspapers had become profitable powerhouses of advocacy, muckraking and sensationalism, along with serious, and objective news-gathering. During the early 20th century, prior to rise of television, the average American read several newspapers per-day. Starting in the 1920s changes in technology again morphed the nature of American journalism as radio and later, television, began to play increasingly important competitive roles.

In the late 20th century, much of American journalism became housed in big media chains. With the coming of digital journalism in the 21st century, all newspapers faced a business crisis as readers turned to the Internet for sources and advertisers followed them.

John Fremont Hill

John Fremont Hill (October 29, 1855 in Eliot, Maine – March 16, 1912 in Eliot, Maine) was an American capitalist and politician. He served in a number of positions in Maine government, including as the 45th Governor of Maine from 1901 to 1905.

He graduated from the Medical School of Maine (Bowdoin College) in 1877 and studied at the Long Island College Hospital Medical School, but practiced medicine only a year. In 1879 he became a member of the law firm (later a publishing house) of J.F. Hill & Co. in Augusta, Maine. He was active in many railroad, steamship, telephone, and banking enterprises.

He was best known as a Republican politician, serving as a member of the Maine House of Representatives in 1888-92, of the Maine Senate from 1892 to 1896, and of the Executive Council in 1898-1899; and he was the 45th Governor of Maine from 1901 to 1905. He was acting chairman in 1908-1911, and chairman in 1911-1912, of the Republican National Committee.

List of Columbia College people

The following list contains only notable graduates and former students of Columbia College, the undergraduate liberal arts division of Columbia University, and its predecessor, from 1754 to 1776, King's College. For a full list of individuals associated with the university as a whole, see the List of Columbia University people. An asterisk (*) indicates a former student who did not graduate.

Omaha Daily Bee

The Omaha Daily Bee was a leading Republican newspaper, and early on featured Rosewater's opinions. The paper's editorial slant frequently pitted it against the Omaha Herald, the Omaha Republican and other local papers. After a 1927 merger, it was published as the Bee-News until folding in 1937.

Republican National Committee

The Republican National Committee (RNC) is a U.S. political committee that provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. It is responsible for developing and promoting the Republican political platform, as well as coordinating fundraising and election strategy. It is also responsible for organizing and running the Republican National Convention. Similar committees exist in every U.S. state and most U.S. counties, although in some states party organization is structured by congressional district, allied campaign organizations being governed by a national committee. Ronna Romney McDaniel is the current committee chairwoman.The RNC's main counterpart is the Democratic National Committee.

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