Victor Gollancz Ltd

Victor Gollancz Ltd (/ɡəˈlænts/) was a major British book publishing house of the twentieth century. It was founded in 1927 by Victor Gollancz and specialised in the publication of high quality literature, nonfiction and popular fiction, including crime, detective, mystery, thriller and science fiction. Upon Gollancz's death in 1967, ownership passed to his daughter, Livia, who sold it to Houghton Mifflin in 1989. Three years later, in October 1992, Houghton Mifflin sold Gollancz to the publishing house Cassell & Co. Cassell and Orion Publishing Group were acquired by Hachette in 1996,[1] and in December 1998 the merged Orion/Cassell group turned Gollancz into its science fiction/fantasy imprint.

Victor Gollancz Ltd
Victor Gollancz
Parent companyOrion Publishing Group
Founded1927
FounderVictor Gollancz
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Headquarters locationLondon
Publication typesBooks
Fiction genresscience fiction, fantasy, horror
Official websitewww.gollancz.co.uk
The Door into Summer cover
A Gollancz edition of The Door into Summer, displaying the distinctive yellow dust jacket style.

Origins as a political house

Gollancz was left-inclined in politics and a supporter of socialist movements. This is reflected in some of the books he published. Victor Gollancz commissioned George Orwell to write about the urban working class in the North of England; the result was The Road to Wigan Pier. His break with Orwell came when he declined to publish Orwell's account of the Spanish Civil War, Homage to Catalonia, the pair having drifted apart on political grounds. He did publish The Red Army Moves by Geoffrey Cox on the Winter War, which was critical of the Soviet attack on Finland, but also foresaw that the Red Army would defeat the Germans. He also published works by German exiles, such as Hilde Meisel.

Gollancz was the original publisher of a number of authors and their books including:

Many of Gollancz's books were published in one of their familiar house dust jackets, of which the most famous was bright yellow, with the title and author rendered in a vibrant, bold typography.[2]

Transition to science fiction and fantasy genres

In 1998 Gollancz was developed into a science fiction and fantasy imprint Gollancz Science Fiction after it was acquired by Orion Publishing Group. Gollancz then proceeded to manage the SF Masterworks series, previously overseen by Orion sister-imprint Millennium. Gollancz has published award-winning and award-nominated books by, among others:[1]

Expansion into manga

In 2005 Gollancz set up a manga publishing arm, Gollancz Manga, which published UK editions of various Viz Media properties. As of 2014, Gollancz no longer publish manga and Viz Media have re-released the publisher's series.

The following titles have been published:

Case Closed volumes 1–15
Dragon Ball volumes 1–16
Dragon Ball Z volumes 1–4
Fushigi Yūgi volumes 1–17
Flame of Recca volumes 1–10
Maison Ikkoku volumes 1–15
One Piece volumes 1–12
Rurouni Kenshin volumes 1–16
Yu-Gi-Oh! volumes 1–7
Yu-Gi-Oh! Duelist volumes 1–15

SF Gateway website

In 2011, Gollancz launched the SF Gateway website, an online library that features out-of-print science fiction books republished as e-books. Gollancz aims to make 5,000 or more books available by 2014 and the website will be integrated with the online Encyclopedia of Science Fiction.[3]

Accolades

In terms of the number of published works that have been nominated for major awards, Gollancz ranks as one of the field's top publishers of science fiction, fantasy and horror fiction.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ "History of Hachette Australia". hachette.com.au.
  2. ^ Inspiration: Yellow jackets, skinnylaminx.com. Retrieved 25 December 2018.
  3. ^ Neill, Graeme (20 July 2011). "Gollancz opens sci-fi Gateway to e-books". The Bookseller. Retrieved 6 April 2012.
  4. ^ "Top SF/F/H Publishers". Worlds Without End.

Further reading

  • Edwards, Ruth Dudley. Victor Gollancz: A Biography. London: V. Gollancz, 1987. ISBN 0-575-03175-1.
  • Hodges, Sheila. Gollancz: The Story of a Publishing House, 1928–1978. London: V. Gollancz, 1978. ISBN 0-575-02447-X.
  • Williams, Richard and Ralph Spurrier. Gollancz Crime Fiction 1928-1988: A Checklist of the First Editions, with a Guide to their Values. Scunthorpe: Dragonby Press, 1989. ISBN 187112204X.

External links

A Pocketful of Rye

A Pocketful of Rye is a 1969 novel by A. J. Cronin about a young Scottish doctor, Carroll, and his life in Switzerland. It is a sequel to A Song of Sixpence.

As with several of his other novels, Cronin drew on his own experiences as a doctor for this book. The titles of both novels come from the children's nursery rhyme, Sing a Song of Sixpence.

A Song of Sixpence

A Song of Sixpence is a 1964 novel by A. J. Cronin about the coming to manhood of Laurence Carroll and his life in Scotland. Its sequel is A Pocketful of Rye.

As with several of his other novels, Cronin drew on his own experiences growing up in Scotland for this book. The titles of both novels come from the children's nursery rhyme, "Sing a Song of Sixpence".

A Thing of Beauty

A Thing of Beauty is a novel by author A. J. Cronin, initially published in 1956, with the alternate title of Crusader's Tomb. It tells the story of Stephen Desmonde, an English painter who struggles for recognition in a conventional world, sacrificing everything for his passion for art. The title is a reference to John Keats' 1818 poem, Endymion, which begins with "A thing of beauty is a joy for ever."

Arthur C. Clarke Award

The Arthur C. Clarke Award is a British award given for the best science fiction novel first published in the United Kingdom during the previous year. It is named after British author Arthur C. Clarke, who gave a grant to establish the award in 1987. The book is chosen by a panel of judges from the British Science Fiction Association, the Science Fiction Foundation, and a third organisation, which as of 2012 is the Sci-Fi-London film festival. The award has been described as "the UK's most prestigious science fiction prize".Any "full-length" science fiction novel written or translated into English is eligible for the prize, provided that it was first published in the United Kingdom during the prior calendar year. There is no restriction on the nationality of the author, and the publication history of works outside the United Kingdom is not taken into consideration. Books may be submitted for consideration by their publishing company, and beginning in 2016 self-published titles have been eligible with certain qualifications. An official call for entries is issued to UK publishers every year and members of the judging panel and organisation committee also actively call in titles they would like to see submitted. A title must be actively submitted in order to be considered. The judges form a shortlist of six works that they feel are worthy of consideration, from which they select a winning book. The winner receives an engraved bookend and a prize consisting of a number of pounds sterling equal to the current year, such as £2012 for the year 2012. Prior to 2001, the award was £1000.During the 32 nomination years, 125 authors have had works nominated, 27 of whom have won. China Miéville has won three times, while Pat Cadigan and Geoff Ryman have won twice; no other author has won multiple times. Stephen Baxter and Gwyneth Jones have the most nominations at seven, and Baxter has the most nominations without winning. Neal Stephenson has won once out of six nominations; Ken MacLeod and Kim Stanley Robinson have also been nominated six times. Paul J. McAuley and Miéville have been nominated five times; McAuley has one win, whereas MacLeod and Robinson have none.

Dolphin Island (novel)

Dolphin Island: A Story of the People of the Sea is a children's novel by Arthur C. Clarke first published in 1963.

Empire of the Sun

Empire of the Sun is a 1984 novel by English writer J. G. Ballard; it was awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Like Ballard's earlier short story "The Dead Time" (published in the anthology Myths of the Near Future), it is essentially fiction but draws extensively on Ballard's experiences in World War II. The name of the novel is derived from the etymology of the name for Japan.

Ballard later wrote of his experiences in China as a boy and the making of the film of the same name in his autobiography Miracles of Life.

Exultant (novel)

Exultant is a science fiction novel by British author Stephen Baxter. It is part two of the Destiny's Children series. The book was published by Victor Gollancz Ltd in September 2004.

Fever Pitch

Fever Pitch: A Fan's Life is a 1992 autobiographical essay by British author Nick Hornby. The book is the basis for two films: Fever Pitch (1997, UK) and Fever Pitch (2005, U.S.). The first edition was subtitled "A Fan's Life", but later paperback editions were not.

High Fidelity (novel)

High Fidelity is a novel by British author Nick Hornby first published in 1995. It has sold over a million copies and was later adapted into a feature film in 2000 and a Broadway musical in 2006. In 2003, the novel was listed on the BBC's survey The Big Read.

How the World Was One

How the World Was One: Beyond the Global Village is Arthur C. Clarke's history and survey of the communications revolution, published in 1992. The title includes an intentional pun; in English How the World Was Won would sound exactly the same. This work is based on an earlier work by Clarke entitled Voice Across the Sea, published in 1958.

Imperial Earth

Imperial Earth is a science fiction novel by British writer Arthur C. Clarke, published in 1975 by Gollancz Books. The plot follows the protagonist, Duncan Makenzie, on a trip to Earth from his home on Titan, in large part as a diplomatic visit to the U.S. for its quincentennial in 2276, but also to have a clone of himself produced. The book was published in time for the U.S. bicentennial in 1976.

John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel

The John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel, or Campbell Memorial Award, is an annual award presented by the Center for the Study of Science Fiction at the University of Kansas to the author of the best science fiction novel published in English in the preceding calendar year. It is the novel counterpart of the Theodore Sturgeon Award for best short story, awarded by the same organization. The award is named in honor of John W. Campbell (1910–71), whose science fiction writing and role as editor of Analog Science Fiction and Fact made him one of the most influential editors in the early history of science fiction. The award was established in 1973 by writers and critics Harry Harrison and Brian Aldiss "as a way of continuing his efforts to encourage writers to produce their best possible work." Locus magazine has listed it as one of the "major awards" of written science fiction.The winning novel is selected by a panel of science fiction experts, intended to be "small enough to discuss among its members all of the nominated novels". Among members of the panel have been Gregory Benford, Paul A. Carter, James Gunn, Elizabeth Anne Hull, Christopher McKitterick, Farah Mendlesohn, Pamela Sargent, and Tom Shippey. In 2008 Mendlesohn was replaced with Paul Kincaid, and in 2009 Carter left the panel while Paul Di Filippo and Sheila Finch joined. Nominations are submitted by publishers and jurors, and are collated by the panel into a list of finalists to be voted on. The minimum eligible length that a work may be is not formally defined by the center. The winner is selected by May of each year, and is presented at the Campbell Conference awards banquet in June at the University of Kansas in Lawrence as part of the centerpiece of the conference along with the Sturgeon Award. The award has been given at the conference since 1979; prior to then it was awarded at various locations around the world, starting at the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1973. Winners are always invited to attend the ceremony. The Center for the Study of Science Fiction maintains a trophy which records all of the winners on engraved plaques affixed to the sides, and since 2004 winners have received a smaller personalized trophy as well.During the 46 years the award has been active, 176 authors have had works nominated; 46 of these authors have won. In two years, 1976 and 1994, the panel selected none of the nominees as a winner, while in 1974, 2002, 2009, and 2012 the panel selected two winners rather than one. Frederik Pohl and Joan Slonczewski have each won twice, the only authors to do so, out of four and two nominations, respectively. Kim Stanley Robinson and Paul J. McAuley have won once out of seven nominations, and Jack McDevitt, Adam Roberts, and Robert J. Sawyer have won once out of five nominations, while Nancy Kress, Bruce Sterling, and Robert Charles Wilson have won once out of four nominations. Greg Bear has the most nominations without winning at nine, followed by Sheri S. Tepper at six, James K. Morrow at five, and William Gibson, Ken MacLeod, and Charles Stross at four.

Navigator (Baxter novel)

Navigator is a science fiction novel by British writer Stephen Baxter, the third in his alternate history series Time's Tapestry.

Shannon's Way

Shannon's Way is a 1948 novel by Scots author, A. J. Cronin. It continues the story of Robert Shannon from Cronin's previous novel, The Green Years (1944).

The Complete Chronicles of Conan

The Complete Chronicles of Conan: Centenary Edition is a collection of fantasy short stories written by Robert E. Howard featuring his sword and sorcery hero Conan the Barbarian. The book was published in 2006 by Gollancz and is an omnibus of their earlier collections The Conan Chronicles, Volume 1: The People of the Black Circle and The Conan Chronicles, Volume 2: The Hour of the Dragon, though the stories are rearranged. The collection is edited by Stephen Jones and was issued to celebrate the centenary of Howard's birth. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines The Phantagraph, Weird Tales, Super-Science Fiction, Magazine of Horror, Fantasy Fiction, Fantasy Magazine and The Howard Collector.

The Conan Chronicles, 1

The Conan Chronicles: Volume 1: The People of the Black Circle is a collection of fantasy short stories written by Robert E. Howard featuring his sword and sorcery hero Conan the Barbarian. The book was published in 2000 by Gollancz as eighth volume of their Fantasy Masterworks series. The book, edited by Stephen Jones, presents the stories in their internal chronological order. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines The Phantagraph, Weird Tales, Super-Science Fiction, Magazine of Horror and Fantasy Fiction.

The Northern Light (novel)

The Northern Light is a 1958 novel by A. J. Cronin. In the story, The Northern Light is a respected local newspaper which has just resisted a takeover bid from a London conglomerate. The book is about the London company's unsuccessful attempt to ruin the paper by running a sensationalist rival paper.

The Positronic Man

The Positronic Man is a 1992 novel by American writers Isaac Asimov and Robert Silverberg, based on Asimov's novelette "The Bicentennial Man".

It tells of a robot that begins to display characteristics, such as creativity, traditionally the province of humans; the robot is ultimately declared an official human being.

The film Bicentennial Man, starring Robin Williams, was based both on the original story and the novel.

The Priests of Psi

The Priests of Psi (1980) is a collection of five short stories written by science fiction author Frank Herbert. All of the works had been previously published in magazine or book form.

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