Vic Janowicz

Victor Felix "Vic" Janowicz (February 26, 1930 – February 27, 1996) was an American football halfback in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins. He played college football at Ohio State University and was drafted in the seventh round of the 1952 NFL Draft. Janowicz was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1976.

Vic Janowicz
Vic Janowicz
No. 40
Position:Halfback
Personal information
Born:February 26, 1930
Elyria, Ohio
Died:February 27, 1996 (aged 66)
Columbus, Ohio
Career information
College:Ohio State
NFL Draft:1952 / Round: 7 / Pick: 79
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing yards:410
Average:4.1
Touchdowns:7
Player stats at NFL.com
Vic Janowicz
Catcher
Born: February 26, 1930
Elyria, Ohio
Died: February 27, 1996 (aged 66)
Columbus, Ohio
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 31, 1953, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Last MLB appearance
September 10, 1954, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Career statistics
Batting average.214
Home runs2
Runs batted in10
Teams

Early life

Janowicz was born and raised in Elyria, Ohio as son of Polish immigrants. He went to Holy Cross Elementary School and graduated from Elyria High School. The stretch of Seventh Street which runs along the south side of Elyria High is named Vic Janowicz Drive in his honor, and the school's official address is 311 Vic Janowicz Drive. In addition, a life-size painting of Janowicz hangs in the lobby of the school.

College career

Janowicz played college football at Ohio State University. A tailback in the single wing, he won the Heisman Trophy in 1950 as a junior. Woody Hayes, who coached Janowicz's senior year, said of him, "He was not only a great runner, but also passed, was a placekicker and punter, played safety on defense and was an outstanding blocker. Janowicz epitomized the 'triple-threat' football player."

Professional career

After college, Janowicz passed up offers to play professional football in order to pursue a baseball career. He reached the major leagues with the Pittsburgh Pirates, but hit only .214 over two seasons as a bench player. He returned to football late in the 1954 season with the Washington Redskins, and was their starting halfback in 1955. During training camp in 1956, he suffered a serious brain injury in an automobile accident that left him partially paralyzed and ended his athletic career.

Janowicz eventually made a full recovery and became a broadcaster of Buckeye football games. Later he worked as an account executive at a Columbus manufacturing firm and, from 1986, as an administrative assistant to the state auditor.

St. Joseph Cemetery (Lockbourne, Ohio) - Vic Janowicz grave
Janowicz's grave at St. Joseph Cemetery (Lockbourne, Ohio)

He died in Columbus, Ohio, of cancer in 1996.

External links

1950 All-Big Nine Conference football team

The 1950 All-Big Nine Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Nine Conference teams for the 1950 Big Nine Conference football season. The selectors for the 1950 season were the Associated Press (AP), based on a vote of the conference coaches, and the United Press (UP). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UP are designated in bold.

Michigan captured the Big Nine championship, was ranked #9 in the final AP Poll, defeated California in the 1951 Rose Bowl, and placed three of its player on one or both of the first teams. Michigan's honorees were halfback Chuck Ortmann, fullback Don Dufek, and tackle Robert Wahl.

Illinois compiled a 7–2 record and a #13 ranking in the final AP Poll and had four players selected as first-team honorees. The Illinois first-team honorees were halfback Dick Raklovits, end Tony Klimek, center Bill Vohaska and guard Chuck Brown.

Ohio State compiled a 6–3 record and a #14 ranking in the final AP Poll and placed four players on the first team. The Ohio State first-team honorees were quarterback and 1950 Heisman Trophy winner Vic Janowicz, tackle Bill Trautwein, and guard John Biltz

1950 Big Nine Conference football season

The 1950 Big Nine Conference football season was the 55th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Nine Conference (also known as the Western Conference and the Big Ten Conference) and was a part of the 1950 college football season.

The 1950 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bennie Oosterbaan, won the 1950 Big Ten championship with a 6–3–1 record (4–1–1 against Big Ten opponents) and was ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll. In the last game of the regular season, Michigan defeated Ohio State, 9–3, in the Snow Bowl, played in a blizzard, at 10 degrees above zero, on an icy field, and with winds gusting over 30 miles per hour. Michigan then defeated California in the 1951 Rose Bowl. Don Dufek was selected as the team's most valuable player. Tackle Allen Wahl was a first-team All-American.

The 1950 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Wes Fesler, compiled a 6–3 record, led the conference in scoring offense (31.8 points per game), and was ranked No. 14 in the final AP Poll. Halfback Vic Janowicz was a consensus first-team All-American and won both the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the Big Ten's most valuable player and the Heisman Trophy as the best player in college football.

The 1950 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, under head coach Ray Eliot, compiled a 7–2 record, led the conference in scoring defense (6.2 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 13 in the final AP Poll. End Tony Klimek was selected as the team's most valuable player. Tackle Albert Tate and center Bill Vohaska both received first-team All-American honors.

1950 College Football All-America Team

The 1950 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1950. The eight selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1950 season are (1) the All-America Board (AAB), (2) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (3) the Associated Press (AP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FW), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (7) the Sporting News (SN), and (8) the United Press (UP).

Ohio State halfback Vic Janowicz, Army end Dan Foldberg, and Texas guard Bud McFadin were the only three players to be unanimously named first-team All-Americans by all eight official selectors. Janowicz was awarded the 1950 Heisman Trophy.

1950 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

The 1950 Ohio State Buckeyes football team represented Ohio State University in the 1950 Big Nine Conference football season. The Buckeyes compiled a 6–3 record. The season finale against Michigan was the infamous game later known as the Snow Bowl as the teams combined for 45 punts in wintry weather. Ohio State outscored their opponents, 286–111, on the season, but head coach Wes Fesler's record against Michigan fell to 0–3–1.

1951 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1951 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP), United Press (UP) and the International News Service (INS) for the 1951 Big Ten Conference football season.

1951 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1951 Big Ten Conference football season was the 56th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference and the Big Nine Conference) and was a part of the 1951 college football season.

The 1951 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, under head coach Ray Eliot, compiled a 9–0–1 record, won the Big Ten championship, was ranked No. 4 in the final AP poll, and defeated Stanford 40–7 in the 1952 Rose Bowl. The lone setback was a scoreless tie with Ohio State. Halfback Johnny Karras was the Big Ten's only consensus first-team All-American. Linebacker Chuck Boerio was selected as the team's most valuable player.

The 1951 Wisconsin Badgers football team, under head coach Ivy Williamson, compiled a 7–1–1 record, led the conference in scoring defense (5.9 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 8 in the final AP poll. Quarterback John Coatta was the first-team All-Big Ten quarterback. Defensive end Pat O'Donahue was selected as a first-team All-American by multiple selectors.

1952 NFL Draft

The 1952 National Football League Draft was held on January 17, 1952, at Hotel Statler in New York. Selections made by New York Yanks were assigned to the new Dallas Texans.

Washington Post sportswriter Mo Siegel later claimed that Washington Redskins owner George Preston Marshall let him choose a late-round pick. Siegel, he said, chose Tennessee Tech's Flavious Smith to force the first black player onto the all-white Redskins. If true, Marshall likely persuaded NFL Commissioner Bert Bell to remove the choice from the official records. (Smith, who did not hear the story until years later, was white.)

Chicago Tribune Silver Football

The Chicago Tribune Silver Football is awarded by the Chicago Tribune to the college football player determined to be the best player from the Big Ten Conference. The award has been presented annually since 1924, when Red Grange of Illinois was the award's first recipient.The winner of the Silver Football is determined by a vote of Big Ten head football coaches. Each coach submits a two-player ballot with a first and second choice, and coaches cannot vote for players on their own team. The first-place vote receives two points and the second-place vote receives one point.Coaches and media of the Big Ten also make annual selections for additional individual honors.

Janowicz

Janowicz (Polish pronunciation: [jaˈnɔvit͡ʂ]) is a Polish language surname. Notable bearers include:

Jerzy Janowicz (born 1990), Polish professional tennis player

Mikolaj Janowicz Kiezgajlo, Lithuanian: Mykolas Kęsgaila Valimantaitis (died c. 1450), Lithuanian nobleman from Deltuva

Ryszard Pędrak-Janowicz (1932, Lwów – 2004, Kraków), Polish luger

Stanislaw Janowicz Kiezgajlo (died 1526), Lithuanian nobleman

Victor Felix "Vic" Janowicz (1930–1996), American football halfback

John Hlay

John Hlay (born May 21, 1930 in Niles, Ohio) is a former college football running back. He was a fullback and linebacker for the Ohio State University Buckeyes from 1950 to 1952.

List of athletes who played in Major League Baseball and the National Football League

Fewer than 70 athletes are known to have played in both Major League Baseball (MLB) and the National Football League (NFL). This includes two Heisman Trophy winners (Vic Janowicz and Bo Jackson) and seven members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame (Red Badgro, Paddy Driscoll, George Halas, Ernie Nevers, Ace Parker, Jim Thorpe, and Deion Sanders). However, none of the players on the list has been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

In 1920, the inaugural season of the NFL, 11 veterans of MLB (including George Halas and Jim Thorpe) became the first athletes to accomplish the feat. Since 1970, only seven athletes have done so, including Bo Jackson and Deion Sanders. Jackson was the first athlete to be selected as an All-Star in both MLB and the NFL. Sanders holds the longevity record, having appeared in 641 MLB games and 189 NFL games.

Ohio State Buckeyes football

The Ohio State Buckeyes football team competes as part of the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision, representing Ohio State University in the East Division of the Big Ten Conference. Ohio State has played their home games at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio since 1922. The Buckeyes are recognized by the university and NCAA as having won eight national championships along with 39 conference championships (including 37 Big Ten titles), seven division championships, 10 undefeated seasons, and six perfect seasons (no losses or ties). As of 2017, the football program is valued at $1.5 billion, the highest valuation of any such program in the country.The first Ohio State game was a 20–14 victory over Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, Ohio, on May 3, 1890. The team was a football independent from 1890 to 1901 before joining the Ohio Athletic Conference (OAC) as a charter member in 1902. The Buckeyes won two conference championships while members of the OAC and in 1912 became members of the Big Ten Conference.Ohio State won their first national championship in 1942 under head coach Paul Brown. Following World War II, Ohio State saw sparse success on the football field with three separate coaches and in 1951 hired Woody Hayes to coach the team. Under Hayes, Ohio State won over 200 games, 13 Big Ten championships and five national championships (1954, 1957, 1961, 1968, and 1970), and had four Rose Bowl wins in eight appearances. Following Hayes' dismissal in 1978, Earle Bruce and later John Cooper coached the team to a combined seven conference championships between them. Jim Tressel was hired as head coach in 2001 and led Ohio State to its seventh national championship in 2002. Under Tressel, Ohio State won seven Big Ten championships and appeared in eight Bowl Championship Series (BCS) games, winning five of them. In November 2011, Urban Meyer became head coach. Under Meyer, the team went 12–0 in his first season and set a school record with 24 consecutive victories, won three Big Ten championships (2014, 2017, and 2018), and won the first College Football Playoff National Championship of its kind in 2014.

Ohio State Buckeyes football yearly statistical leaders

Ohio State Buckeyes football yearly statistical leaders in points scored, rushing yards, passing yards, receptions, and total tackles.

Ohio State Football All-Century Team

The Ohio State Football All-Century Team was chosen in early 2000 by the Touchdown Club of Columbus. It was selected to honor the greatest Ohio State Buckeyes football players of the 20th century. No effort was made to distinguish a first team or second team, the organization instead choosing only to select an 80-man roster and a five-man coaching staff.

Members selected to the team were honored at a banquet on February 19, 2000. Living members of the team elected all-century captains and an all-century Most Valuable Player. As captains they chose Archie Griffin and Rex Kern on offense, and Chris Spielman and Jack Tatum on defense. Archie Griffin was selected as MVP.

Ohio State Varsity O Hall of Fame

The Ohio State Varsity "O" Hall of Fame is the athletic hall of fame for The Ohio State University. Its purpose is to recognize individuals who have contributed to the honor and fame of the University in the field of athletics.

An athlete must have earned at least one Varsity "O" letter to be eligible. An athlete is considered for recognition a minimum of five years after the graduation of his or her class. A coach or member of the athletic department must have served the Ohio State University for at least 15 years to be considered.

Sporting News College Football Player of the Year

The Sporting News College Football Player of the Year award is given to the player of the year in college football as adjudged by Sporting News.

Tony Curcillo

Anthony Curcillo Jr. (born May 27, 1931 in Long Branch, New Jersey) is a former Grey Cup champion football player in the National Football League and Canadian Football League.

UPI College Football Player of the Year

The United Press International College Football Player of the Year Award was among the first and most recognized college football awards. With the second bankruptcy of UPI in 1991, along with that of its parent company, the award was discontinued. Offensive and defensive players were eligible. Unlike the Heisman, it was never affiliated with a civic organization or named after a player (like the Walter Camp Award). Like all UPI college awards at the time, it was based on the votes of NCAA coaches. Billy Cannon, O.J. Simpson, and Archie Griffin are the only two-time winners.

Vic (name)

Vic or Vik is short for Victor. It may refer to:

Vic Aldridge (1893–1973), American Major League Baseball pitcher

Vic Bellamy (born 1963), American football player

Vic Chesnutt (1964–2009), American singer-songwriter

Vic Chou, Taiwanese actor, singer and commercial model

Vic Damone (1928–2018), American singer and entertainer

Vic Dana (born 1940), American actor and singer

Vic Davalillo (born 1936), Venezuelan baseball player

Vic Dhillon (born 1969), Canadian politician

Vic Dickenson (1906–1984), African-American jazz trombonist

Vic Duggan (1910–2007), speedway racer who won the London Riders' Championship in 1947

Vic Elford (born 1935), former English sportscar racing, rallying and Formula One driver

Vic Fuentes (born 1983), American singer, songwriter and musician

Vic Godard, British singer-songwriter formerly of the punk group Subway Sect

Vic Grimes (born 1963), American professional wrestler

Vic Howe (1929–2015), Canadian professional ice hockey player

Vic Janowicz (1930–1996), American college and National Football League halfback, member of the College Football Hall of Fame

Vic Kulbitski (1921–1998), American football player

Vic Lee (disambiguation), multiple people

Vic Lewis (1919–2009), British jazz guitarist and bandleader

Vic Maile (1943–1989), British record producer

Vic Mignogna (born 1962), American voice actor and musician

Vic Mizzy (1916–2009), American composer

Vic Morrow (1929—1982), American actor

Vic Perrin (1916–1989), American actor and voice artist

Vic Peters (1955–2016), Canadian curler

Vic Raschi (1919–1988), Major League Baseball pitcher

Vic Reeves (born 1959), English comedian

Vic Ross (1900–74), American lacrosse player

Vic Rouse (disambiguation), multiple people

Vic Ruggiero, musician, songwriter and producer from New York City

Vic Seixas (born 1923), American Hall of Fame former top-10 tennis player

Vic Snyder (born 1947), American politician from the US state of Arkansas

Vic Stasiuk (born 1929), Canadian retired professional ice hockey left winger

Vic Stelly (born 1941), retired businessman from Lake Charles, Louisiana

Vic Stollmeyer (1916–1999), West Indian cricketer

Vic Tayback (1930–1990), American actor

Vic Toews (born 1952), Canadian politician

Vic Wunderle (born 1976), American archer

Vic Janowicz—awards, and honors

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