Vic Bradford

Henry Victor Bradford (March 5, 1915 – June 10, 1994) was an outfielder in Major League Baseball. He played for the New York Giants in 1943.[1]

Vic Bradford
Outfielder
Born: March 5, 1915
Brownsville, Tennessee
Died: June 10, 1994 (aged 79)
Paris, Kentucky
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 1, 1943, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
May 14, 1943, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.200
Home runs0
Runs batted in1
Teams

References

  1. ^ "Vic Bradford Statistics and History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved 2010-12-09.

External links

1937 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1937 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1937 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 44th overall and 5th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his seventh year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of nine wins and one loss (9–1 overall, 6–0 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a loss against California in the 1938 Rose Bowl.

The Crimson Tide opened the season with three consecutive shutouts against Howard, Sewanee and South Carolina. In their fourth game, Alabama surrendered their first points of the season on defense in their 14–7 victory over Tennessee. They then shutout their next two opponents, George Washington and Kentucky prior to their game at Tulane. Against the Green Wave, the Crimson Tide won 9–6 on a game-winning fourth-quarter field goal by Hayward Sanford. After their sixth shutout of the season against Georgia Tech, Alabama won their second game of the season on a fourth quarter Sanford field goal against Vanderbilt, and clinched the SEC championship with the win. With their undefeated regular season, Alabama accepted an invitation to play in the 1938 Rose Bowl where they lost 13–0 to California.

1938 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1938 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1938 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 45th overall and 6th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his eighth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of seven wins, one loss and one tie (7–1–1 overall, 4–1–1 in the SEC).

The Crimson Tide opened the season with a 19–7 victory in an intersectional contest against USC at Los Angeles. They then followed up the win with consecutive shutouts, home victories over non-conference opponents Howard and NC State on homecoming. However, Alabama then was shut out 13–0 by Tennessee, their first loss against the Volunteers since 1932. The Crimson Tide then rebounded with victories against Sewanee, Kentucky and Tulane. After a 14–14 tie against Georgia Tech, Alabama defeated Vanderbilt in their season finale.

With a final record of 7–1–1, Alabama was ranked No. 13 in the final AP Poll of the season. Additionally, after the season the Associated Press recognized Alabama as having the best record (40–4–3) and highest winning percentage (.909) of any major college team for the five-year period between 1934 and 1938. Statistically, the defense was one of the most dominant in school history and still holds numerous defense records.

1938 All-SEC football team

The 1938 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1938 college football season. Tennessee won the conference.

1943 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1943 New York Giants season was the franchise's 61st season. The team finished in eighth place in the National League with a 55–98 record, 49½ games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

A. M. Ebright

Alpha Mills Ebright (July 4, 1881 – October 16, 1947) was an American basketball and baseball coach and a player of baseball. He served as the head basketball (1907–08) and baseball coach (1906–1908) at the University of Missouri, and head baseball coach at Kansas University (1909).

After his coaching career, Ebright practiced law in Wichita, Kansas.

Adrian Lindsey

Adrian Hobart "Ad" Lindsey (August 15, 1895 – October 2, 1980) was an American football player and coach of football and baseball. He served as the head football coach at Bethany College in Lindsborg, Kansas from 1922 to 1926, at the University of Oklahoma from 1927 to 1931, and at the University of Kansas from 1932 to 1938, compiling a career college football record of 66–64–16. Lindsey was also the head baseball coach at Kansas for one season in 1921, tallying a mark of 13–2.

Baylor Bears baseball

The Baylor Bears baseball team represents Baylor University in NCAA Division I college baseball. The team belongs to the Big 12 Conference and plays home games at Baylor Ballpark. The Bears are currently led by head coach Steve Rodriguez, who was hired in 2015.

Charles Mosley (coach)

Charles Philip "Bubs" Mosley (March 24, 1888 – August 25, 1968) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Baylor University from 1914 to 1919 and at Wichita Falls Junior College—now Midwestern State University—from 1924 to 1925, compiling a career college football record of 34–26–6. Mosley was also the head basketball coach at Baylor from 1914 to 1920, tallying a mark of 28–65, and the school's head baseball coach from 1914 to 1919, amassing a record of 47–60.

J. C. Ewing

Joseph Chalmers Ewing (June 1, 1875 – April 5, 1965) was an American football and baseball coach. He served as the third head football coach at Baylor University, coaching in 1902 and compiling a record of 2–4–2. Ewing was also the first head baseball coach at Baylor, coaching the 1902 season and tallying a mark of 5–9.

Ewing married Louise Woodward Currier on October 29, 1903, in Greeley, Colorado. He later worked as a lawyer in Greeley.

Jay Bond

James Edward "Jay" Bond (April 11, 1885 – May 15, 1954) was an American football and baseball coach. He was the 16th head football coach at the University of Kansas, serving the 1918 season, which was shortened due to an outbreak of influenza on campus. Bond's 1918 Kansas Jayhawks football team compiled a record of 2–2. Bond was also the head baseball coach at Kansas from 1918 to 1919, tallying a mark of 5–9.

John Bunn

John W. Bunn (September 26, 1898 – August 13, 1979) was an American basketball coach and key contributor to the game of basketball. The Wellston, Ohio native played three seasons under coach Phog Allen at University of Kansas while earning his bachelor's degree (1917–21). He later became an assistant to Allen for nine seasons (1921–30). His In 1930 he became men's basketball head coach at Stanford University, where he coached college all-time great Hank Luisetti. His 1936–37 team finished the season with a 25–2 record and was retroactively named the national champion by the Helms Athletic Foundation and the Premo-Porretta Power Poll. After he left Stanford, Bunn went on to coach Springfield College (1946–56) and Colorado State College (now the University of Northern Colorado) (1956–63).

Bunn served as chairman of the Basketball Hall of Fame from 1949 to 1963. On October 1, 1964, Bunn was inducted to the Basketball Hall of Fame as a contributor. For his contribution, the Basketball Hall of Fame annually presents an award in his name.

Leon McCarty

Leon McCarty (June 20, 1888 – September 18, 1962) was an American football and baseball coach. He was the 17th head football coach at the University of Kansas, serving for one season, in 1919, and compiling a record of 3–2–3. McCarty also was head baseball coach at Kansas from 1914 to 1917 and in 1920, tallying a record of 37–21–1 and winning Missouri Valley Conference championships in 1914 and 1915.

McCarty was a 1910 graduate of Ohio State University, where he lettered in football in 1908 and 1909.

Lloyd Russell

Lloyd Opal Russell (April 10, 1913 – May 24, 1968) was an American football and baseball player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He served as the head football coach at North Texas State Teachers College, now the University of North Texas, in 1942, tallying a mark of 3–5. Russell was also the head baseball coach at Baylor University from 1940 to 1941 and again from 1958 to 1961, compiling a record of 72–58–1.

Russell played baseball for the Cleveland Indians in 1938 before starting his coaching career. He served in both the Atlantic and Pacific for the United States Navy during World War II.

Luther Burleson

Luther Franklin Burleson (November 16, 1880 – November 17, 1924) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the seventh head football coach at Baylor University, coaching one season in 1907 and compiling a record of 4–3–1. Burleson was also the first head basketball coach at Baylor, coaching two seasons from 1906 to 1908 and tallying a mark of 10–9. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at Baylor for three seasons, coaching from 1906 to 1908 and amassing a record of 25–34.

Marty Pattin

Martin William Pattin (April 6, 1943 – October 3, 2018) was an American professional baseball player who played in the Major League Baseball as a right-handed pitcher. He pitched for the California Angels (1968), Seattle Pilots (1969), Milwaukee Brewers (1970–1971), Boston Red Sox (1972–1973), and the Kansas City Royals (1974–1980). During a 13-year baseball career, Pattin compiled 114 wins, 1,179 strikeouts, and a 3.62 earned run average (ERA). He had a pitching motion that resembled Denny McLain with a high leg kick.

Mickey Sullivan

Mickey Sullivan (February 6, 1932 – March 22, 2012) was the head baseball coach at Baylor from 1974 to 1994.

Mike Getto

Michael J. Getto (September 18, 1905 – August 27, 1960) was a professional football coach in the National Football League for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1942. That season, he coached Brooklyn to a 3–8 record. Prior to his coaching career, Getto played college football while attending the University of Pittsburgh, where he earned All-American honors in 1928. After graduating from Pitt, Getto remained with the school as a football coach for the freshman team. He then worked as an assistant football coach from 1929 to 1939 and again in 1947 to 1950 at the University of Kansas. While at Kansas, Getto inspired his hometown of Jeannette, Pennsylvania to adopt the Jayhawk mascot for their high school athletic teams.

R. N. Watts

Richard Nottingham Watts (February 3, 1873 – December 3, 1945) was an American football and baseball coach. He served as the fourth head football coach at Baylor University, coaching in 1903 and compiling a record of 4–3–1. Ewing was also the second head baseball coach at Baylor, coaching from 1903 to 1904 and tallying a mark of 13–18. He was an alumnus of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, where he had played football previously. He later worked for the US Geological Survey.

Steve Rodriguez

Steven James Rodríguez (born November 29, 1970) is a former second baseman/shortstop in Major League Baseball who played briefly for the Boston Red Sox and Detroit Tigers during the 1995 season. Listed at 5' 8", 170 lb., Rodríguez batted and threw right-handed. A native of Las Vegas, Nevada, he was selected by Boston in the fifth-round of the 1992 draft out of Pepperdine. Rodríguez was hired as the 19th head coach of the Baylor University baseball team on June 12, 2015.

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