Viborg Stadium

Energi Viborg Arena (originally Viborg Stadion) is a football stadium located in Viborg, Denmark. It is the home ground of Viborg FF and has a capacity of 9,566. The stadium is part of Viborg Stadion Center and is owned by Viborg Municipality.[1] Since October 2011, it has been known as Energi Viborg Arena due to a sponsorship arrangement, giving naming rights to Energi Viborg, a regional energy group. It was one of four venues for the 2011 UEFA European Under-21 Football Championship, hosting three matches in Group B and a semi-final. The old stadium from 1931 was torn down in 2001 to make room for a new stadium with 9,566 seats. The new stadium came with covered seating and heating in the field. The extensions around the new stadium was finished in 2007, and there was added ekstra standing places for both home and away team fans. In 2008 two big screens were added to the new stadium. Other uses have included hosting concerts with a capacity of 22,000 concertgoers.[1]

Energi Viborg Arena
Viborg Stadion
Energi Viborg Arena logo (2011)
Naming rights agreement since October 2011
Viborg Stadion1
View of the playing field of the stadium
Full nameEnergi Viborg Arena
Former namesViborg Stadion (1931–2011)
Energi Viborg Arena (2011–present)
LocationStadion Allé 7
DK-8800 Viborg
OwnerViborg Stadion Center (Viborg Municipality)[1]
Capacity9,566 (association football)[2]
17,000 (concerts)[1]
Field size105 by 68 metres (114.8 yd × 74.4 yd)[2]
SurfaceGrass
Construction
Built19??–1931
Opened5 July 1931[3]
Renovated2001–2001
2007
Construction cost62.1 million kr. (2001)
Tenants
Viborg FF

History

Logos used under sponsorship arrangements for Viborg Stadium:

Energi Viborg Arena logo (2011)

Energi Viborg Arena
(2011–)
Sponsor: Energi Viborg

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Viborg Kommune - Borger - Kultur og fritid - Fritidstilbud - Viborg Stadion Center - Viborg Stadion" (in Danish). Viborg Municipality. 11 August 2014. Archived from the original on 13 March 2016.
  2. ^ a b "Viborg FF - Fakta om stadion". www.vff.dk (in Danish). Viborg: Viborg FF. Archived from the original on 13 August 2009. Retrieved 13 August 2009. Stadionkapacitet: 9.566, overdækkede siddepladser. (V: 2.662; N:2.072; Ø: 2.792; S: 2.040); Banestørrelse: 105 x 68 m.; Lysanlæg: 1200 lux.;CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  3. ^ Møller, Dan Ersted (5 July 2005). "Viborgs historie - Historier - Sportens by". www.viborghistorie.dk (in Danish). Lokalhistorisk Arkiv for Viborg Kommune, Viborg Centralbibliotek, Viborg Stiftsmuseum. Archived from the original on 9 January 2017. Retrieved 9 January 2017.

External links

Coordinates: 56°27′21.23″N 9°24′7.43″E / 56.4558972°N 9.4020639°E

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He began his career at Brøndby and joined Chelsea at the age of 15 in February 2012, making his professional debut in October 2014. From 2015 to 2017 he was loaned to Bundesliga club Borussia Mönchengladbach, where he made 82 appearances and scored 7 goals. Christensen made his full international debut for Denmark in June 2015, and represented the nation at the 2018 World Cup.

Christian Eriksen

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Denmark women's national football team

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