Vern Burke

Vernon Eugene Burke (born April 30, 1941) is a former American football tight end who played five seasons in the NFL with the San Francisco 49ers, Atlanta Falcons, and the New Orleans Saints.

Vern Burke
No. 83, 84
Position:Split End, Tight End
Personal information
Born:April 30, 1941 (age 77)
San Luis Obispo, California
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:215 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school:Bakersfield (CA) North
College:Oregon State
NFL Draft:1963 / Round: 5 / Pick: 64
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • Pop Warner Trophy (1963)
  • Oregon Sports Hall of Fame (ind. 1982)
  • OSU Hall of Fame (ind. 1991)
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school career

Burke attended North High School in Bakersfield, California and starred in football.

College career

Burke attended Bakersfield College before he enrolled at Oregon State to play football. He lettered in football in 1961 and 1962, earning a spot as a first team Consensus All-American at split end in 1962. Burke caught 69 passes for 1,007 yards, both NCAA records at the time. The Beavers finished 9–2 after a 6–0 victory over Villanova in the Liberty Bowl. The Beavers' lone touchdown in that game came on a 99-yard rushing touchdown by Beaver quarterback and 1962 Heisman Trophy winner, Terry Baker.

For his achievements in his senior season, Burke was chosen to play in the 1963 East-West Shrine Game and 1963 Hula Bowl.[1] Burke was also awarded the 1963 W.J. Voit Memorial Trophy as the outstanding football player on the Pacific Coast.

Professional career

Burke was drafted in the 5th round of the 1963 NFL Draft, the 64th pick overall, by the San Francisco 49ers. Burke did not debut in the NFL however until 1965. He later spent a year each with the Atlanta Falcons and the New Orleans Saints.[2][3]

Legacy

Burke was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1982 and the Oregon State University Sports Hall of Fame in 1991.

References

  1. ^ "Oregon State University Sports Hall of Fame". osubeavers.com. Archived from the original on November 20, 2015. Retrieved January 4, 2008.
  2. ^ "Vern Burke". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved January 4, 2008.
  3. ^ "Beavers in the Pros" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on February 8, 2015. Retrieved January 4, 2008.

External links

1962 College Football All-America Team

The 1962 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1962. The six selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1962 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (5) the Sporting News, and (6) the United Press International (UPI).

1962 Oregon State Beavers football team

The 1962 Oregon State Beavers football team represented Oregon State University in the 1962 NCAA college football season. The Beavers ended this season with nine wins and two losses.

Quarterback Terry Baker won the Heisman Trophy as the most outstanding collegiate football player in the U.S. Baker also won the Maxwell Award and was named Sportsman of the Year by Sports Illustrated. The team captain was George Gnoss.

The Beavers scored 279 points and allowed 148 points. Led by head coach Tommy Prothro, the Beavers won the Liberty Bowl.

1963 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1963 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1963 college football season.

1963 American Football League draft

The 1963 American Football League draft was held in Dallas on Saturday, December 1, 1962.The Kansas City Chiefs drafted as the Dallas Texans, as their relocation would take place a few months later. With the first overall selection, they took Buck Buchanan, a defensive tackle from Grambling in Louisiana. The NFL draft was held two days later in Chicago.

1963 College Football All-America Team

The 1963 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1963. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1963 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Central Press Association (CP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (6) the Sporting News, and (7) the United Press International (UPI).

1963 NFL Draft

The 1963 National Football League draft was held at the Sheraton Hotel in Chicago, Illinois, on Monday, December 3, 1962.The first overall selection was quarterback Terry Baker of Oregon State, the Heisman Trophy winner, taken by the Los Angeles Rams. The AFL draft was held two days earlier in Dallas.

1963 Oregon State Beavers football team

The 1963 Oregon State Beavers football team represented Oregon State University as an independent during the 1963 college football season. In their ninth season under head coach Tommy Prothro, the Beavers compiled a 5–5 record and were outscored by their opponents, 198 to 192. The team played its home games at Parker Stadium in Corvallis, Oregon.

1966 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1966 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's inaugural season in the National Football League (NFL). The Falcons finished in seventh place in the NFL Eastern Conference with a record of 3–11, ahead of only the New York Giants.

Bakersfield College

Bakersfield College (BC) is a public community college located in Bakersfield, California, United States. BC serves about 22,000 students each semester or 31,000 annually, and offers Associate's degree, certificate programs, and is one of fifteen California Community Colleges offering a Baccalaureate Degree for students to choose from. BC is part of the Kern Community College District (KCCD), which is itself part of the California Community Colleges system.

List of NCAA major college football yearly receiving leaders

The list of college football yearly receiving leaders identifies the major college receiving leaders for each season from 1937 to the present. It includes yearly leaders in three statistical categories: (1) receptions, (2) receiving yardage; (3) yards per reception; and (4) receiving touchdowns.

Eleven players have led the NCAA in one or more of these categories in multiple seasons. They are: Reid Moseley of Georgia (1944-1945); Hugh Campbell of Washington State (1960-1961); Vern Burke of Oregon State (1962-1963); Howard Twilley of Tulsa (1964-1965); Ron Sellers of Florida State (1967-1968); Jerry Hendren of Idaho (1968-1969); Mike Siani of Villanova (1970-1971); Steve Largent of Tulsa (1974-1975); Jason Phillips of Houston (1987-1988); Alex Van Dyke of Nevada (1994-1995); and Brennan Marion of Tulsa (2007-2008).

Since 1937, the NCAA record for receiving yards in a single season has been set or broken nine times as follows: Jim Benton of Arkansas in 1937 (814 yards); Hank Stanton of Arizona in 1941 (820 yards); Ed Barker of Washington State 1951 (864 yards); Hugh Campbell of Washington State in 1960 (881 yards); Vern Burke of Oregon State in 1962 (1,007 yards); Fred Biletnikoff of Florida State in 1964 (1,179 yards); Howard Twilley of Tulsa in 1965 (1,779 yards); Alex Van Dyke of Nevada in 1995 (1,854 yards); and Trevor Insley of Nevada in 1999 (2,060 yards).

During that same time, the record for receptions in a single season has been set or broken 13 times as follows: Jim Benton of Arkansas in 1937 (48); Hank Stanton of Arizona in 1941 (50); Barney Poole of Ole Miss in 1947 (52); Ed Brown of Fordham in 1952 (57); Dave Hibbert of Arizona in 1958 (61); Hugh Campbell of Washington State in 1962 (69); Larry Elkins of Baylor in 1963 (70); Howard Twilley of Tulsa in 1964 (95) and 1965 (134); Manny Hazard of Houston in 1989 (142); Freddie Barnes of Bowling Green in 2009 (155); and Zay Jones of East Carolina in 2016 (158).

List of Oregon State Beavers in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Oregon State Beavers football players in the NFL Draft.

List of people from Bakersfield, California

Notable people from Bakersfield, California;

Oildale, California

Oildale is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kern County, California, United States. Oildale is located 3.5 miles (5.6 km) north-northwest of downtown Bakersfield, at an elevation of 469 feet (143 m). The population was 32,684 at the 2010 census, up from 27,885 at the 2000 census. It is an unincorporated suburban town just north of Bakersfield across the Kern River, west of the Kern River Oil Field, and east of Highway 99.

Oregon Sports Hall of Fame

The Oregon Sports Hall of Fame honors Oregon athletes, teams, coaches, and others who have made a significant contribution to sports in Oregon. The first class was inducted in 1980, with new inductees added in the fall. Operated by the Oregon Sports Trust, the museum is currently closed in preparation for moving to another facility.

Oregon State Beavers football

The Oregon State Beavers football team represents Oregon State University in NCAA Division I FBS college football. The team first fielded an organized football team in 1893 and is a member of the Pac-12 Conference's North Division. Jonathan Smith has been the head coach since November 29, 2017. Their home games are played at Reser Stadium in Corvallis, Oregon.

Oregon State Beavers football statistical leaders

The Oregon State Beavers football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Oregon State Beavers football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Beavers represent Oregon State University in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference.

Although Oregon State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1893, the school's official record book doesn't generally list statistics from before the 1950s, as records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1950s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Beavers have played in 9 bowl games since this decision, allowing many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Vern

Vern is a masculine given name, often a short form (hypocorism) of Vernon, Lavern or other names. People named Vern include:

Vernon Vern Bakalich (1929-2015), New Zealand rugby league player

Verdi Vern Barberis (1928–2005), Australian weightlifter

Vernon Vern Buchanan (born 1951), American politician, member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Florida

Vern Bullough (1928–2006), American historian and sexologist

Vernon Vern Burke (born 1941), American former National Football League player

Vernon Vern Clark (born 1944), former US Navy admiral and Chief of Naval Operations

Lavern Vern Corbin, American college basketball player (1926-1929)

Vernon Vern Countryman (1917-1999), American Harvard Law School professor and social critic

Vern Den Herder (born 1948), American retired National Football League player and member of the College Football Hall of Fame

Vern Fleming (born 1962), American former National Basketball Association player

Vern Fonk (1930–2006), American entrepreneur best known for founding Vern Fonk Insurance, a high-risk auto insurance agency

Vern Gardner (1925–1987), American National Basketball Association player

Vernon Vern Gosdin (1934–2009), American country music singer

Vernon Arnold Haugland (1908-1984), American reporter, war correspondent and writer

Vernon Vern Kaiser (1925-2011), Canadian National Hockey League player

Vern Oliver Knudsen (1893–1974), American acoustical physicist

Vern Krishna, Canadian law professor and accountant

Vernon Vern Law (born 1930), American retired Major League Baseball pitcher

Arild Verner Vern Mikkelsen (1928-2013), American National Basketball Association player

Vern Miller (born 1928), American attorney, former police officer and former Attorney General of Kansas

Vern Moore (footballer) (1895–1955), former Australian rules footballer

Vern Mullen (1900-1980), American National Football League player

Vern Paxson, Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley

Vern Poore (fl. 1975-1996), American Oscar-winning sound engineer

Vern Poythress (born 1946), American Calvinist philosopher, theologian and New Testament scholar

Lavern Vern Pyles, American politician, former member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives (1975-1980)

Vernal Vern Riffe Jr. (1925–1997), American politician, longest serving speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives

Vernon Vern Roberson (born 1952), American former National Football League and Canadian Football League player

Vern Rutsala (1934–2014), American poet

Vern L. Schramm (born 1941), American biochemist and professor

Vern Smith (journalist) (1892-?), American communist, journalist and editor

Vernon Vern Sneider (1916–1981), American novelist best known for The Teahouse of the August Moon

Vernon Vern Stephens (1920-1968), American Major League Baseball player

Verner E. Suomi (1915-1995), Finnish-American educator, inventor and scientist, considered the father of satellite meteorology

Vern Swanson (born 1941), American politician, member of the Kansas House of Representatives

Vern Taylor, Canadian figure skater (1970s) and coach

Vern Terpstra (1927-2013), Professor Emeritus of international business at the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan

Vern Tincher (born 1936), American politician, former member of the Indiana House of Representatives

Delbert Lavern Vern Williams (1930-2006), American bluegrass musician

W. J. Voit Memorial Trophy

The W. J. Voit Memorial Trophy was awarded by the Helms Athletic Foundation from 1951 to 1978 to the outstanding college football player on the Pacific Coast. The recipient was determined based on votes cast by West Coast football writers and later broadcasters as well. Award recipients include College Football Hall of Fame inductees, O.J. Simpson, Mike Garrett, Jim Plunkett, Joe Kapp, Craig Morton, Billy Kilmer, and Anthony Davis.

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