Vean Gregg

Sylveanus Augustus Gregg was born April 13, 1885, in Chehalis, Washington. For three years, the left-hander was one of the most dominant pitchers in the major leagues.

Vean Gregg
1912 Vean Gregg.jpeg
Pitcher
Born: April 13, 1885
Chehalis, Washington
Died: July 29, 1964 (aged 79)
Aberdeen, Washington
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 12, 1911, for the Cleveland Naps
Last MLB appearance
August 25, 1925, for the Washington Senators
MLB statistics
Pitching Record92-63
Earned run average2.70
Strikeouts720
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

Gregg started his professional career in Portland, Oregon in 1910 with the Pacific Coast League. He threw 14 shutouts.

The next year, he played for the Cleveland Naps, going 23–7 with a league leading 1.80 ERA. In 1912 and 1913, he started 34 games both years with an identical 20–13 record each season.

Vean Gregg baseball player
Vean Gregg with the Cleveland Naps.

Gregg was traded to the Boston Red Sox in mid-1914. He played for them on both the 1915 and 1916 World Series championship teams. He developed a sore arm in 1914 and had continual arm problems for the rest of his career.

In December 1917, Connie Mack acquired Gregg for the Philadelphia Athletics. He went 9–14 in 30 games in 1918 with a respectable 3.12 ERA for the last-place Athletics. Gregg did not play baseball at any level from 1919 to 1921.

He returned to the Pacific Coast League in Seattle, Washington in 1922 and played there until 1924. In 1925, he signed with the Washington Senators and went 2–2 with two saves after a 6-year absence from major league baseball. He later was inducted in the Pacific Coast League Hall of Fame.

Gregg's major league career record is 92–63 with a lifetime 2.70 ERA in 1,393 innings pitched and 720 strikeouts. He was the only pitcher in the 20th century to win 20 games or more in his first three seasons. His brother, Dave, pitched one inning in 1913 as Vean's teammate for the Cleveland Naps.

Vean Gregg died on July 29, 1964 in Aberdeen, Washington.

See also

External links

1885 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1885 throughout the world.

1911 Cleveland Naps season

The 1911 Cleveland Naps season was a season in American major league baseball. It involved the Cleveland Naps attempting to win the American League pennant and finishing in third place (22 games back). They had a record of 80 wins and 73 losses.

The Naps played their home games at League Park II.

1911 Major League Baseball season

The 1911 Major League Baseball season was the last season in which none of the current 30 MLB stadiums were in use. The oldest current ballpark is Fenway Park, opened in 1912.

1912 Cleveland Naps season

The 1912 Cleveland Naps season was a season in American baseball. The Naps had two of the best hitters in the majors in Shoeless Joe Jackson and Nap Lajoie. Despite this, they ended up back in the second division, finishing in fifth place with a record of 75-78.

1913 Cleveland Naps season

The 1913 Cleveland Naps season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 86–66, 9½ games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1914 Boston Red Sox season

The 1914 Boston Red Sox season was the fourteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 91 wins and 62 losses.

1914 Cleveland Naps season

The 1914 Cleveland Naps season was a season in American baseball. The team finished eighth in the eight-team American League with a record of 51–102, 48½ games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1915 Boston Red Sox season

The 1915 Boston Red Sox season was the fifteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 101 wins and 50 losses. The team then faced the National League (NL) champion Philadelphia Phillies in the 1915 World Series, which the Red Sox won in five games to capture the franchise's third World Series.

1916 Boston Red Sox season

The 1916 Boston Red Sox season was the sixteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 91 wins and 63 losses. The team then faced the National League (NL) champion Brooklyn Robins in the 1916 World Series, which the Red Sox won in five games to capture the franchise's second consecutive and fourth overall World Series.

1918 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1918 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 52 wins and 76 losses.

1925 Washington Senators season

The 1925 Washington Senators won 96 games, lost 55, and finished in first place in the American League. Fueled by the excitement of winning their second AL pennant, the Senators led 3 games to 1 in the World Series before succumbing to the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Cleveland Indians award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Cleveland Indians professional baseball team.

History of baseball in Portland, Oregon

Portland, Oregon, has been home to many baseball teams, dating back to the 19th century.

List of Major League Baseball career ERA leaders

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched (i.e. the traditional length of a game). It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors (including pitchers' defensive errors) are recorded as unearned runs and are not used to determine ERA.

This is a list of the top 100 players in career earned run average, who have thrown at least 1,000 innings.

Ed Walsh holds the MLB earned run average record with a 1.816. Addie Joss (1.887) and Jim Devlin (1.896) are the only other pitchers with a career earned run average under 2.000.

List of Pacific Coast League no-hitters

Since the Pacific Coast League (PCL) was established in 1903, its pitchers have pitched 167 no-hitters, which includes 10 perfect games. Of these no-hitters, 102 were pitched in games that lasted at least the full nine innings, while 65 were pitched in games shortened due to weather or that were played in doubleheaders. Only three of the league's ten perfect games were tossed in full nine-inning games. Nine no-hitters, including one perfect game, were combined—thrown by two or more pitchers on the same team.

An official no-hit game occurs when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, regardless of the number of innings thrown by the pitcher(s). In a no-hit game, a batter may still reach base via a walk, an error, a fielder's choice, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference. Also, due to these methods of reaching base, it is possible for a team to score runs without getting any hits. While the vast majority of no-hitters are shutouts, no-hit teams have managed to score runs in their respective games eight times.

Nine players have thrown multiple no-hitters. The pitcher who holds the record for the shortest time between no-hitters is Tom Drees, the only pitcher in PCL history to throw no-hitters in consecutive starts, while playing for the Vancouver Canadians in 1989. Drees threw a third no-hitter that season giving him the most PCL no-hitters in a single season and in a career. Besides Drees, Alan Foster (in 1967) is the only other PCL pitcher to throw two no-hitters in the same regular season. Other pitchers with two no-hitters are Roger Bowman, Eli Cates, Dick Estelle, Charles Fanning, Charley Hall, Sam McDowell, and Elmer Singleton.

The team with the most no-hitters is the Portland Beavers, with 21, one of which was a perfect game. They are followed by the Oakland Oaks (17 no-hitters, one a perfect game) and the Tacoma Tigers/Giants/Twins/Yankees/Rainiers (12 no-hitters, one a perfect game). The team with the most perfect games is the Nashville Sounds, with two. Of the three nine-inning perfect games in the league's history two were thrown by Nashville.

List of Pacific Coast League records

The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a Minor League Baseball league operating at the Triple-A level. It was founded in 1903 as circuit of six teams on the West Coast of the United States. Today, it is composed of 16 teams that stretch from California to Middle Tennessee. This list documents the PCL's top players and teams in particular statistical areas. These records are correct as of the end of the 2016 season.

The PCL was one of the premier regional baseball leagues in the first half of the 20th century. Although it was never recognized as a true major league, its quality of play was considered very high. In 1958, with the arrival of major league teams on the west coast and the availability of televised major league games, the PCL's modern era began with each team signing Player Development Contracts to become farm teams of major league clubs.

The mild climate of the West Coast, especially California, allowed the league to play longer seasons, sometimes starting in late February and ending as late as the beginning of December. Teams regularly played between 170 and 200 games in a season until the late 1950s. This abundance of games and playing time is one reason that a number of league records were set during the first half of the 20th century.

Pacific Coast League Hall of Fame

The Pacific Coast League Hall of Fame is an American baseball hall of fame which honors players, managers, and executives of the Pacific Coast League (PCL). It was created by the Helms Athletic Foundation of Los Angeles in 1942 to honor those individuals who made significant contributions to the league's ideals. The Hall of Fame inducted its first class in 1943. A special Hall of Fame room was set up at Los Angeles' Wrigley Field on June 27, 1943.After the 1957 death of founder and main supporter Paul Helms and the arrival of Major League Baseball in the PCL's two largest markets, Los Angeles and San Francisco, the Hall went dormant. In 2003, with the Pacific Coast League celebrating its centennial season, the Hall was revived. In its first new induction in 2003, twenty-one pre-1957 inductees were elected. The aim of the PCL's Hall of Fame Committee is to eventually recognize worthy players from before 1957, as well as those who made more recent contributions to the league. As of 2018, 110 individuals have been inducted into the Pacific Coast League Hall of Fame.

South Dakota State Jackrabbits baseball

The South Dakota State Jackrabbits baseball team is the varsity intercollegiate baseball program of South Dakota State Jackrabbits in Brookings, South Dakota, United States. The program's first season was in 1947, and it has been a member of the NCAA Division I Summit League since the start of the 2008 season. Its home venue is Erv Huether Field, located on South Dakota State's campus. Rob Bishop is the team's head coach starting in the 2017 season. The program has appeared in 1 NCAA Tournaments at the Division I level, while making 9 at the Division II level. It has won 1 conference tournament championships and 0 regular season conference titles. As of the start of the 2018 Major League Baseball season, 5 former Jackrabbits has appeared in Major League Baseball.

Tom Seaton

Thomas Gordon Seaton (August 30, 1887 – April 10, 1940), he was signed in 1909 as a pitcher by the Portland, Oregon baseball team in the Pacific Coast League. In 1910 he was part of a pitching staff that included Gene Krapp, Jack Graney, Bill Steen and Vean Gregg. The Philadelphia Phillies drafted Seaton in 1912.

After struggling through a mediocre season in 1912, Seaton became a dominating pitcher in 1913 appearing in 52 games and compiling a 27–12 record in 322 innings. After a dispute involving his wife and the Phillies, Seaton signed with the Brooklyn Tip-Tops of the Federal League. Seaton went 25–14 that year. Seaton struggled in 1915.

After the Federal League folded after the 1915 season, Seaton pitched for the Chicago Cubs. He eventually was released and returned to the Pacific Coast League.

After the Black Sox Scandal of 1919, Seaton and Luther "Casey" Smith were released in May 1920 due to rumors "...regarding the practices of the players (Seaton and Smith) and their associates."

He died April 10, 1940.

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