Vauquois

Vauquois is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

During World War 1, Vauquois was the site of violent mine warfare,[2] also in connection with the Battle of Verdun (1916). From 1915 to 1918, French and German tunneling units fired 519 separate mines at Vauquois, and the German gallery network beneath the village hill (the Butte de Vauquois) grew to a length of 17 kilometres (11 mi). Vauquois was completely destroyed and many huge craters and dugouts remain.

The French papyrologist Jean Maspero (1885–1915) died in Vauquois.

Vauquois
Skyline of Vauquois
Location of Vauquois
Vauquois is located in France
Vauquois
Vauquois
Vauquois is located in Grand Est
Vauquois
Vauquois
Coordinates: 49°12′14″N 5°04′24″E / 49.2039°N 5.0733°ECoordinates: 49°12′14″N 5°04′24″E / 49.2039°N 5.0733°E
CountryFrance
RegionGrand Est
DepartmentMeuse
ArrondissementVerdun
CantonClermont-en-Argonne
IntercommunalityCommunauté de communes de Montfaucon-Varennes-en-Argonne
Government
 • Mayor (2008–2014) Jean-Pierre Delandre
Area
1
8.14 km2 (3.14 sq mi)
Population
 (2016-01-01)[1]
20
 • Density2.5/km2 (6.4/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
55536 /55270
Elevation184–290 m (604–951 ft)
(avg. 318 m or 1,043 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Populations légales 2016". INSEE. Retrieved 25 April 2019.
  2. ^ http://www.webmatters.net/france/ww1_vauquois.htm
46th Infantry Regiment (France)

The 46th Infantry Regiment was part of the French Army's 10th Infantry Division based in Paris. It saw action during the First World War, particularly during the Argonne offensive, where, in October 1914—along with the rest of the division—it saw heavy fighting and suffered heavy casualties. It took part in the Battle of Vauquois in February the following year, where, the regimental band—playing the Marseilles for the 46th, 76th, and 89th as they attacked—were among the first to be killed. The regiment's standard bearer was Collignon, a former councillor of state, while its adjutant was Maurice Cazeneuve, tenor of the Opéra-Comique. Both were killed in action at Vauquois. During the Battle of Verdun in May it was commanded by Lieutenant Gustave Cohen.Following the defeat of Germany in the Second World war, and the division of Berlin, the regiment occupied the city's French zone.

ALGOL 60

ALGOL 60 (short for Algorithmic Language 1960) is a member of the ALGOL family of computer programming languages. It followed on from ALGOL 58 which had introduced code blocks and the begin and end pairs for delimiting them. ALGOL 60 was the first language implementing nested function definitions with lexical scope. It gave rise to many other programming languages, including CPL, Simula, BCPL, B, Pascal and C.

Niklaus Wirth based his own ALGOL W on ALGOL 60 before moving to develop Pascal. Algol-W was intended to be the next generation ALGOL but the ALGOL 68 committee decided on a design that was more complex and advanced rather than a cleaned simplified ALGOL 60. The official ALGOL versions are named after the year they were first published. Algol 68 is substantially different from Algol 60 and was criticised partially for being so, so that in general "Algol" refers to dialects of Algol 60.

Amanty

Amanty is a commune in the Meuse department in the Grand Est region in northeastern France.

Arras-class aviso

The Arras-class, sometimes known as the Amiens class, were a series of aviso (also referred to as sloops) built for the French Navy at the end of World War I.

Auguste Chaillou

Auguste Chaillou (21 August 1866 – 23 April 1915) was a French biologist and physician born in Parennes in the department of Sarthe. He worked at the Hôpital des Enfants-Malades, and for most of his career was associated with the Pasteur Institute in Paris.

Chaillou is best known for his development of the anti-diphtheria serum with Émile Roux and Louis Martin (1864-1946) at the Pasteur Institute. The three men presented their findings at the Tenth International Congress of Hygiene in Budapest (1894). From 1895 until 1914 he was chief of anti-rabies services at the Pasteur Institute. As a medical officer during World War I he was killed on the battlefield of Vauquois.

Beausite

Beausite is a commune in the Meuse department in the Grand Est region in northeastern France.

The former towns of Amblaincourt, Deuxnouds-devant-Beauzée, and Seraucourt were joined to Beauzée-sur-Aire on 1 December 1972, which subsequently changed its name to Beausite on 1 January 1973.

Brieulles-sur-Meuse

Brieulles-sur-Meuse is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in northeastern France.

Cheppy

Cheppy is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in northeastern France.

It was a site of fighting during World War I. An American monument sculpted by Nancy Coonsman was erected there by the State of Missouri after the war to honor the volunteers of the state.

Geville

Geville is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

List of World War I memorials and cemeteries in the Argonne

List of World War I memorials and cemeteries in the Forest of Argonne.

Moirey-Flabas-Crépion

Moirey-Flabas-Crépion is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Montfaucon-d'Argonne

Montfaucon-d'Argonne is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France. It is home to the Meuse-Argonne American Memorial.

Peter Naur

Peter Naur (25 October 1928 – 3 January 2016) was a Danish computer science pioneer and Turing award winner. His last name is the "N" in the BNF notation (Backus–Naur form), used in the description of the syntax for most programming languages. He contributed to the creation of the ALGOL 60 programming language.

Rarécourt

Rarécourt is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Romagne-sous-Montfaucon

Romagne-sous-Montfaucon is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

The Commune is home to the Romagne '14-'18 museum of WWI artifacts

Nearby is the American Battle Monuments Commission's Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery for US military killed during the First World War.

Spincourt

Spincourt is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Tunnel warfare

Tunnel warfare is a general name for war being conducted in tunnels and other underground cavities. It often includes the construction of underground facilities (mining or undermining) in order to attack or defend, and the use of existing natural caves and artificial underground facilities for military purposes. Tunnels can be used to undermine fortifications and slip into enemy territory for a surprise attack, while it can strengthen a defence by creating the possibility of ambush, counterattack and the ability to transfer troops from one portion of the battleground to another unseen and protected. Also, tunnels can serve as shelter for combatants and non-combatants from enemy attack.

Since antiquity, sappers have used mining against a walled city, fortress, castle or other strongly held and fortified military position. Defenders have dug counter mines to attack miners or destroy a mine threatening their fortifications. Since tunnels are commonplace in urban areas, tunnel warfare is often a feature, though usually a minor one, of urban warfare.

Tunnels are narrow and restrict fields of fire; thus troops in a tunnel usually have only a few areas exposed to fire or sight at any one time. They can be part of an extensive labyrinth and have cul-de-sacs and reduced lighting, typically creating a closed-in night combat environment.

Void-Vacon

Void-Vacon is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Communes of the Meuse department

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