Vargas (state)

Vargas State (Spanish: Estado Vargas, IPA: [esˈtaðo ˈβaɾɣas]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. Named after Venezuela's first non-military president, José María Vargas, Vargas comprises a coastal region in the north of Venezuela, bordering Aragua to the west, Miranda to the east, the Caribbean Sea to the north and the Capital District to the south. It is home to both the country's largest seaport and airport. The state capital is La Guaira. The Litoral Varguense conurbation is the principal urban agglomeration in the state, which is part of the Greater Caracas Area.

In 1999, the geographic center of Vargas state suffered major floods and landslides, known as La Tragedia de Vargas (the Vargas tragedy), causing major losses of life and property, and resulting in forced population movements, including the virtual disappearance of some small towns. Thousands died, and many more fled the area to other states.

Vargas
Flag of Vargas

Flag
Coat of arms of Vargas

Coat of arms
Motto(s): 
Igualdad, Libertad, Prosperidad y Seguridad
(English: Equality, Liberty, Prosperity and Security)
Anthem: Carmañola Americana
Location within Venezuela
Location within Venezuela
Coordinates: 10°34′19″N 66°52′48″W / 10.572°N 66.88°WCoordinates: 10°34′19″N 66°52′48″W / 10.572°N 66.88°W
CountryVenezuela
Created1998
CapitalLa Guaira
Government
 • GovernorJorge García Carneiro (2017–2021)
Area
 • Total1,172 km2 (453 sq mi)
Area rank22nd
 0.16% of Venezuela
Population
 (2011 census est.)
 • Total352,920
 • Rank21st
 1.29% of Venezuela
Time zoneUTC-04:00 (VET)
ISO 3166 codeVE-X
Emblematic treeUva de Playa (Coccoloba uvífera)
Websitewww.estadovargas.gob.ve

History

Montañasdeslave
A section of the Vargas state after the 1999 Tragedy - notice the scars in the mountains due to the mudslides.

This region of Venezuela has undergone important changes over the years, and while the geographical borders have remained, the territorial delineation has varied. The area was previously one of the departments of the Venezuela's Federal District (the other being the Libertador department, now Libertador Municipality), and the governor of this region was chosen by the national government. The area later evolved into a municipality, but was still dependent on the governor of the Federal District. In the 1990s there were increased calls for Vargas to become a separate entity, distinct from Federal District. In 1998 the government of Rafael Caldera decreed Vargas as an independent municipality, separate from the Federal District, with the statute of Federal Territory. Shortly after it became the 23rd state of Venezuela.

In mid-December 1999, after several days of ever-increasing rains pouring over the Central Mountain Range and the piedmont within the span of 24 hours along the coastline for about 45 km (28 mi)., the state suffered from massive floods which resulted in severe losses of life and property. In its wake as of December 16, the surviving population witnessed the massive destruction of most of the state infrastructure, including the collapse of most roads, bridges, housings, public and private buildings, and of basic services as electricity and communications; in which thousands were killed or missing. Official estimates some 50,000 dead or missing, but the real figure may be much higher. In the following weeks nearly the entire state's population was displaced. Locals refer to the Dec. 1999 disaster as "La Tragedia de Vargas" (the Vargas' Tragedy). Such climatic phenomenon (of extraordinarily high rainfall levels) appears to be periodical, having a cycle of about 70 years, and probably has occurred hundreds, perhaps thousands of times since a distant past.

Geopolitical division

Vargas state map
Vargas state map
Guipuzcoana house
Guipuzcoana House seat of the state government

Vargas State covers a total surface area of 1,497 km2 (578 sq mi).

Municipality

  1. Vargas (La Guaira)

Parishes

Population

Race and ethnicity

According to the 2011 Census, the racial composition of the population was:[1]

Racial composition Population %
Mestizo N/A 48.1
White 153,252 44.7
Black 19,199 5.6
Other race N/A 1.6

Sites of interest

Turismo estado vargas
Tourism is vital to economy of the Vargas state.

Simón Bolívar International Airport

Beaches

  • Aeropuerto
  • Caruao
  • La Punta
  • Marina Grande
  • Punta Care
  • Anare
  • Catia La Mar
  • La Sabana
  • Naiguatá
  • Quebrada Seca
  • Arrecífe
  • Chichiriviche
  • La Salina
  • Oricao
  • San Luis
  • Bahía Marina
  • Chuspa
  • La Zorra
  • Oritapo
  • Sheraton
  • Bikini
  • Círculo Militar
  • Larga
  • Osma
  • Taguao
  • Buchón
  • El Burro
  • Los ángeles
  • Pantaleta
  • Tarma
  • Camurí Chico
  • El Chorrito
  • Los Caracas
  • Paraíso
  • Todasana
  • Candileja
  • El Farallón
  • Los Cocos
  • Puerto Carayaca
  • Urama
  • Caribito
  • Escondida
  • Macuto
  • Puerto Cruz
  • Verde
Shanty town in Vargas state
Shanty town in Vargas state

See also

References

  1. ^ "Resultado Básico del XIV Censo Nacional de Población y Vivienda 2011 (Mayo 2014)" (PDF). Ine.gov.ve. p. 29. Retrieved 8 September 2015.

External links

Battle of La Guaira (1812)

The Battle of La Guaira was a naval engagement fought in the Caribbean Sea on 11 December 1812 during the war between Britain and the United States. An American privateer captured a British letter of marque at the Spanish port of La Guaira in Venezuela.

Carmañola Americana

The Carmañola Americana (American Carmagnole) is a revolutionary song composed circa 1797 following the model of the French Carmagnole. In context, it was composed during the independentist movement of Manuel Gual and José María España. The song incited the population to revolt against dictatorial rule, seeking for freedom and independence.

Currently, the Carmañola Americana is the anthem for the Vargas State, Venezuela.

Catia La Mar

Catia La Mar is a city and port in the municipality of Vargas, in the State of Vargas, Venezuela. It is Maiquetia's neighbor to the west.

Catia la Mar is about 10 minutes from Simón Bolívar International Airport (Venezuela's main airport).

Named after the 16th-century cacique Catia, contemporary of Guaicaipuro, founded in 1558 by Francisco Fajardo with the name of "La Villa de Catia", currently called Catia la Mar. The city hosts a naval academy and university, a fishing port called La Zorra, and several beaches (Costa Dorada, Playa La Zorra, Playa Candilejas, Puerto Viejo). Its main neighborhoods are Atlantida, Playa Grande, Páez, Ezequiel Zamora, La Lucha, and La Soublette.

According to the 2011 population census, the city had 85,366 inhabitants, making it the most populous of the 11 parishes in Vargas State.

The city was affected by the 1999 Vargas tragedy.

Edwin Escobar

Edwin José Escobar Hernandez (born April 22, 1992) is a Venezuelan professional baseball pitcher for the Yokohama DeNA BayStars of Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB). He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Boston Red Sox and Arizona Diamondbacks.

La Guaira

La Guaira (Spanish: [la ˈɣwai.ɾa] (listen)) is the capital city of the Venezuelan state of Vargas and the country's main port. It was founded in 1577 as an outlet for Caracas, 30 kilometres (19 mi) to the southeast. The town and the port were badly damaged during the December 1999 floods and mudslides that affected much of the region.

The city hosts its own professional baseball team in the Venezuelan Professional Baseball League, the Tiburones de La Guaira. They have won seven national championships since their founding in 1962.

Maiquetía

Maiquetía is a city located in the Central Region of Venezuela, in the state of Vargas. It is at approximately 19 m above sea level on a small shelf between the Caribbean and the mountains behind it. Caracas, the Venezuelan capital, is approximately 37 km to the southeast.

Maiquetía is mainly a commercial center. The historic center has many narrow streets lined with stores and a market. The main road in this part of the city is the Avenida Carlos Soublette. The recent geopolitical divisions in Vargas makes Maiquetía no longer include the Simón Bolívar International Airport, the most important one in the country and the commercial airport serving Caracas. Conviasa, the Venezuelan flag carrier airline, is headquartered in the city. Even though the airport is now in the state of Vargas, it has kept the name Maiquetía, which cause some confusion among locals and foreigners alike.

The city forms a conurbation with La Guaira with which it is linked via Avenida Soublette. Given its proximity to Caracas and seafront location, it offers an optimal location for some hotels.

Maiquetía suffered the devastating effects of torrential rains and mudslides during the 1999 Vargas tragedy.

Metropolitan Region of Caracas

Metropolitan Region of Caracas (MRC) or Greater Caracas (GC) (Spanish: Región Metropolitana de Caracas; RMC or Gran Caracas; GC) is the urban agglomeration comprising the Metropolitan District of Caracas and the adjacent 11 municipalities over Miranda and Vargas state in Venezuela. Thus, it does not constitute a single administrative unit. The conurbation spreads south, west, east and north of Caracas. It has a population of 5,243,301.

Miss Venezuela 1980

Miss Venezuela 1980 was the 27th Miss Venezuela pageant, was held in Caraballeda, Vargas state, Venezuela, on May 8, 1980, after weeks of events. The winner of the pageant was Maye Brandt, Miss Lara.

The pageant was broadcast live on Venevision from the Macuto Sheraton Hotel in Caraballeda, Vargas state. At the conclusion of the final night of competition, outgoing titleholder Maritza Sayalero, Miss Venezuela 1979 and Miss Universe 1979, crowned Maye Brandt of Lara as the new Miss Venezuela.

Joaquín Riviera held the post of program producer for the first time at this event, which was the first to be broadcast in color nationwide, just weeks before the official completion of conversion to color broadcasts. Joining Gilberto Correa for that year's broadcast were Carmen Victoria Pérez and Hilda Carrero as co-hosts.

14 young ladies entered that year's pageant, while 19 had entered the year prior.

Miss Venezuela 1981

Miss Venezuela 1981 was the 28th Miss Venezuela pageant, was held in Caraballeda, Vargas state, Venezuela, on May 7, 1981, after weeks of events. The winner of the pageant was Irene Sáez, Miss Miranda.

The pageant was broadcast live on Venevision from the Macuto Sheraton Hotel in Caraballeda, Vargas state. At the conclusion of the final night of competition, outgoing titleholder Maye Brandt, crowned Irene Sáez of Miranda as the new Miss Venezuela.

Sáez, and Pilin León, that year's first runner-up, would later go on to become Miss Universe 1981 and Miss World 1981, respectively, marking the first time ever for Venezuela to win both major international beauty pageants in the same year.

Miss Venezuela 1982

Miss Venezuela 1982 was the 29th Miss Venezuela pageant, was held in Caraballeda, Vargas state, Venezuela, on May 6, 1982, after weeks of events. The winner of the pageant was Ana Teresa Oropeza, Miss Guárico.

The pageant was broadcast live on Venevision from the Macuto Sheraton Hotel in Caraballeda, Vargas state. At the conclusion of the final night of competition, outgoing titleholder Irene Sáez, Miss Venezuela 1981 and Miss Universe 1981, crowned Ana Teresa Oropeza of Guárico as the new Miss Venezuela. Veteran Mexican presenter Raúl Velasco joined the hosting team for the first time during that year's pageant, the first time it would be aired via satellite to the United States and all over Spanish-speaking areas of Latin America.

Miss Venezuela 1983

Miss Venezuela 1983 was 30th Miss Venezuela pageant, was held in Caraballeda, Vargas state, Venezuela, on May 5, 1983, after weeks of events. The winner of the pageant was Paola Ruggeri, Miss Portuguesa.

The pageant was broadcast live on Venevision from the Macuto Sheraton Hotel in Caraballeda, Vargas state. At the conclusion of the final night of competition, outgoing titleholder Ana Teresa Oropeza, crowned Paola Ruggeri of Portuguesa as the new Miss Venezuela. The pageant telecast was also part of the network preparations for its broadcast of the 1983 Pan American Games in Caracas later in the year, with Joaquin Rivera acting as executive producer of both the opening and closing ceremonies. For this, a special number was done during the pageant promoting the multisport event.

Miss Venezuela 1984

Miss Venezuela 1984 was the 31st Miss Venezuela pageant, was held in Caraballeda, Vargas state, Venezuela, on May 11, 1984, after weeks of events. The winner of the pageant was Carmen María Montiel, Miss Zulia.

The pageant was broadcast live on Venevision from the Macuto Sheraton Hotel in Caraballeda, Vargas state. At the conclusion of the final night of competition, outgoing titleholder Paola Ruggeri, crowned Carmen María Montiel of Zulia as the new Miss Venezuela.

Miss Venezuela 1985

Miss Venezuela 1985 was the 32nd Miss Venezuela pageant, was held in Caraballeda, Vargas state, Venezuela, on May 3, 1985, after weeks of events. The winner of the pageant was Silvia Martínez, Miss Guárico.

The pageant was broadcast live on Venevision from the Macuto Sheraton Hotel in Caraballeda, Vargas state. At the conclusion of the final night of competition, outgoing titleholder Carmen María Montiel, crowned Silvia Martínez of Guárico as the new Miss Venezuela.

Morón Fault System

The Morón Fault System or Morón Fault Zone (Spanish: Falla Morón) is a complex of geological faults located in northern Venezuela and the adjacent Caribbean Sea. The fault system is of right-lateral strike-slip. The fault forms part of the diffuse boundary between the Caribbean and South American tectonic plates. The existence of this fault was hypothesized as early as 1888.

Sabios de Vargas

The Sabios de Vargas baseball club became a founding member of the Venezuelan Professional Baseball League in its inaugural season of 1946. The team represented the city of La Guaira, Vargas and played its home games at the now-extinct Estadio Cerveza Caracas.

Santa Marta (baseball club)

The Santa Marta BBC were a baseball team that played in the Venezuelan Professional Baseball League during the 1954–1955 season. The team represented the city of La Guaira, Vargas, Venezuela, and played its home games at Estadio Universitario de Caracas.

Santa Marta was managed by former big leaguer Red Kress and entered the league as a replacement for the departed Sabios de Vargas, being part of a four-team league that included the Leones del Caracas, Navegantes del Magallanes and Patriotas de Venezuela.

The team was clearly overmatched, finishing in last place with an 18-33 record, 14½ games out of first place. Santa Marta never reached a high level of popularity, failing to encourage a significant fan support, and folded after its first season.

The franchise would be replaced by the Industriales de Valencia in the 1955-1956 tournament.

Simón Bolívar International Airport (Venezuela)

Simón Bolívar International Airport or Maiquetía "Simón Bolívar" International Airport (IATA: CCS, ICAO: SVMI, Spanish: Aeropuerto Internacional de Maiquetia "Simón Bolívar") is an international airport located in Maiquetía, Vargas, Venezuela about 21 kilometres (13 mi) from downtown Caracas, the capital of the country. Simply called Maiquetía by the local population, it is the main international air passenger gateway to Venezuela. It handles flights to destinations in the Americas, Europe and the Middle East.

Vargas tragedy

The Vargas tragedy was a natural disaster that occurred in Vargas State, Venezuela on 14–16 December 1999, when torrential rains caused flash floods and debris flows that killed tens of thousands of people, destroyed thousands of homes, and led to the complete collapse of the state's infrastructure. According to relief workers, the neighborhood of Los Corales was buried under 3 metres (9.8 ft) of mud and a high percentage of homes were simply swept into the ocean. Entire towns including Cerro Grande and Carmen de Uria completely disappeared. As much as 10% of the population of Vargas died during the event.

Venezuelan Coastal Range

The Venezuelan Coastal Range (Spanish: Cordillera de la Costa or Serranía de la Costa), also known as Venezuelan Caribbean Mountain System (Spanish: Sistema Montañoso Caribe) is a mountain range system and one of the eight natural regions of Venezuela, that runs along the central and eastern portions of Venezuela's northern coast. The range is a northeastern extension of the Andes, and is also known as the Maritime Andes. It covers around 48,866 km2, being the 4th largest natural region in Venezuela.

Capital District
States
Dependencies
Regions
Claimed

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.