Vancouver Canadians

The Vancouver Canadians are a Minor League Baseball team based in the Northwest League (NWL) and the Class A Short Season affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays. They are located in Vancouver, British Columbia, and play their home games at Scotiabank Field at Nat Bailey Stadium. The Canadians were established in 1978 as members of the Triple-A Pacific Coast League (PCL).[2] They joined the NWL in 2000.[3]

The Canadians have won the NWL championship on four occasions (2011, 2012, 2013, and 2017).[4] They previously won the PCL championship three times (1985, 1989, and 1999).[5] The 1999 team also won the Triple-A World Series.[6]

They have been the only Canadian team in the affiliated minor leagues since 2008, the first season after the Ottawa Lynx moved to Allentown, Pennsylvania.

Vancouver Canadians
Founded in 1978
Vancouver, British Columbia
Vancouver C'sC's cap
Team logoCap insignia
Class-level
CurrentClass A Short Season (2000–present)
PreviousTriple-A (1978–1999)
Minor league affiliations
LeagueNorthwest League (2000–present)
DivisionNorthern Division
Previous leagues
Pacific Coast League (1978–1999)
Major league affiliations
CurrentToronto Blue Jays (2011–present)
Previous
Minor league titles
Class titles (1)
  • 1999
League titles (7)
  • 1985
  • 1989
  • 1999
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2017
Conference titles (1)
  • 1999
Division titles (10)
  • 1985
  • 1986
  • 1988
  • 1989
  • 1992
  • 1994
  • 1999
  • 2004
  • 2005
  • 2017
Team data
NicknameVancouver Canadians (1978–present)
ColorsRed, dark red, black, silver, white
                        
MascotBob Brown Bear[1]
BallparkScotiabank Field at Nat Bailey Stadium (2000–present)
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
Vancouver Professional Baseball Partnership
ManagerCasey Candaele
General ManagerAllan Bailey
PresidentAndy Dunn

History

Prior professional baseball in Vancouver

Vancouver was an influential entity in the early history of the Northwest League. They were charter members of every version of the league that would eventually form the NWL, most notably as the sole team that survived the collapse of the Western International League (WIL) in 1922 when it reformed in 1937, winning four pennants in the WIL (1942, 1947, 1949, and 1954) as the Vancouver Capilanos (1939–1954). However, even though they were the final champions of the WIL, Vancouver was not part of its reformation into the Northwest League, due to the NWL's shedding of all of its Canadian teams in order to focus on the American Pacific Northwest. Vancouver was without professional baseball in 1955, but in 1956 the highest calibre of minor league play, in the form of the Open classification Pacific Coast League, came to British Columbia when Oakland Oaks transferred there as the Vancouver Mounties. The Mounties played in the PCL from 1956 through 1962, and from 1965 through 1969.

Pacific Coast League (1978–1999)

The Vancouver Canadians played from 1978 to 1999 as members of the Pacific Coast League at Nat Bailey Stadium. Over the course of 22 seasons, the Canadians won three PCL championships (1985, 1989, and 1999) and the 1999 Triple-A World Series.

Northwest League (2000–present)

Following the 1999 season, the PCL franchise was purchased by a group led by Art Savage and moved to Sacramento, California, for the 2000 season where they became known as the Sacramento River Cats. In a counter move, Medford, Oregon's, Southern Oregon Timberjacks relocated to Vancouver where they continued as the Canadians in the Class A Short Season Northwest League.

The NWL C's were affiliated with the Oakland Athletics from 2000 to 2010. The Canadians had players such as Nick Swisher, Jeremy Brown, Jason Windsor, Joe Blanton, Rich Harden, Travis Buck, Dallas Braden, and Dan Straily on teams during this period.

In 2007, local Vancouver businessmen Jake Kerr and Jeff Mooney purchased the Vancouver Canadians and secured a 25-year lease with the City of Vancouver Parks Board. Extensive work began that offseason in a full-scale stadium renovation which improved washrooms, concessions, concourses, and children's play area. Point-of-purchase concessions increased substantially.

In January 2008, former Washington Nationals executive Andy Dunn become the President and General Manager of the Canadians.

In the spring of 2010, the Vancouver Canadians and Scotiabank announced a long-term partnership that would see Nat Bailey Stadium renamed to Scotiabank Field at Nat Bailey Stadium.

The Canadians became the Short Season A affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays following the 2010 season. This helped see the team's attendance rise to 162,162 for the season, a team record. In September 2011, the Vancouver Canadians won their first Northwest League championship title, defeating the Tri-City Dust Devils, 9–2, to win the final series, 2–1. The following year, the Vancouver Canadians became back-to-back champions for the first time in franchise history, defeating the Boise Hawks, 12–9, to win the final series ,2–1.

In August 2013, outfielder Kevin Pillar became the first alumnus of the team to play in the major leagues for Toronto.[7]

On September 9, 2013 the Canadians became just the third Northwest League team to win three straight championships, defeating the Boise Hawks, 5–0, at Scotiabank Field at Nat Bailey Stadium to win the final series, 2–1, in front of a sellout crowd.[8] The 2013 season also saw the Vancouver Canadians draw over 195,000 fans to Scotiabank Field, a fifth consecutive team record which included 23 sold-out games.

On November 4, 2013, the Vancouver Canadians were named the 2013 recipient of the John H. Johnson President's Award. The prestigious award is given to Minor League Baseball's top organization. It was the first time that a Canadian-based franchise won MiLB's top award.[9]

In 2016, the Canadians led the Northwest League with a total attendance of 222,363, averaging 6,177 per game.[10] This earned them the 2016 Esurance "Home Field Advantage Award" given to the organization in each affiliated minor league with the greatest attendance per percentage capacity.[11] In 2017, the Canadians won another championship, defeating Eugene, 2–1, to win the series, 3–1.[12] They beat their previous record in attendance with 239,527 people in total attendance for the 2017 season, averaging to 6,303 per game. On January 26, 2018, Toronto extended their player-development contract with Vancouver through the 2022 season.[13]

While the Canadians were unable to make the playoffs in 2018, coming in a close second in both the first and second half of the season, they still lead the league in attendance with an impressive 239,086 in total attendance.

NWL playoff history

  • 2004: Lost to Boise 3–0 in finals.
  • 2005: Lost to Spokane 3–2 in finals.
  • 2010: Lost to Everett 2–0 in semifinals.
  • 2011: Defeated Eugene 2–1 in semifinals; defeated Tri-City 2–1 to win championship.
  • 2012: Defeated Everett 2–0 in semifinals; defeated Boise 2–1 to win championship.
  • 2013: Defeated Everett 2–0 in semifinals; defeated Boise 2–1 to win championship.
  • 2014: Defeated Spokane 2–0 in semifinals; lost to Hillsboro 2–0 in finals.
  • 2017: Defeated Spokane 2–0 in semifinals; defeated Eugene 3–1 to win championship.

Canadians attendance

Year Total
Attendance
Average Percent Change Ref
2000 109,576 2,884 N/A [14]
2001 118,357 3,115 +8.0% [15]
2002 127,099 3,345 +7.4% [16]
2003 137,026 3,606 +7.8% [17]
2004 140,037 3,685 +2.2% [18]
2005 124,708 3,370 -8.5% [19]
2006 123,878 3,260 -3.3% [20]
2007 126,491 3,419 +4.9% [21]
2008 129,073 3,585 +4.9% [22]
2009 149,297 3,929 +9.6% [23]
2010 154,592 4,068 +3.5% [24]
2011 162,162 4,267 +4.9% [25]
2012 164,461 4,445 +4.2% [26]
2013 184,042 4,843 +9.0% [27]
2014 180,187 4,870 +0.6% [28]
2015 215,535 5,825 +19.6% [29]
2016 222,363 6,177 +6.0% [30]
2017 239,527 6,303 +2.0% [31]
2018 239,086 6,292 -0.2% [32]

Roster

Vancouver Canadians roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

  • 14 Josh Almonte
  • 18 Gage Burland
  • 00 Elixon Caballero
  • 10 Parker Caracci
  • 25 Juan Diaz
  • 40 Jared DiCesare
  • 36 Nick Fraze
  • 16 William Gaston
  • 17 Luke Gillingham
  • 19 Grayson Huffman
  • 34 Adam Kloffenstein
  • 48 Alek Manoah
  •  6 Nicolas Medina
  • 33 Alex Nolan
  •  3 Mike Pascoe
  • 38 Gabriel Ponce
  • 37 Luis Quinones
  • -- Erick Teran
  • 15 Grant Townsend

Catchers

  • 31 Philip Clarke
  • -- Hagen Danner
  •  4 Jesus Lopez
  • 22 Brett Wright

Infielders

  • 12 Ronny Brito
  • 20 Luis De Los Santos
  • 27 Cameron Eden
  • 26 Tanner Morris
  •  9 Trevor Schwecke

Outfielders

  •  2 Dominic Abaddessa
  • 29 Mc Gregory Contreras
  •  5 Adrian Ramos
  • 23 Will Robertson

Manager

Coaches

  • 24 Daniel Canellas (position)
  • 34 Demetre Kokoris (pitching)
  • 11 Aaron Matthews (hitting)

Injury icon 2.svg 7-day injured list
* On Toronto Blue Jays 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated August 13, 2019
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Northwest League
Toronto Blue Jays minor league players

Media

In the 2019 season, radio rights moved from CKST to CISL Sportsnet 650. As part of the deal, Sportsnet Pacific also gained rights to air a package of Canadians games on television.[33]

Notable former players in the major leagues

References

  1. ^ "Meet Bob Brown Bear".
  2. ^ "Vancouver Canadians Team History". Retrieved April 15, 2019.
  3. ^ "Vancouver Canadians Team History". Retrieved April 15, 2019.
  4. ^ "Vancouver Canadians Team History". Retrieved April 15, 2019.
  5. ^ "Vancouver Canadians Team History". Retrieved April 15, 2019.
  6. ^ "Vancouver Canadians Team History". Retrieved April 15, 2019.
  7. ^ "Echoes From 527: Kevin Pillar | Back in Blue Network – Toronto Blue Jays Website and Weekly Video Podcast". Backinblue.kc-media.net. 2013-06-11. Archived from the original on 2014-07-26. Retrieved 2013-09-05.
  8. ^ "Canadians win third consecutive championship". milb.com\date=September 10, 2013. Retrieved March 15, 2014.
  9. ^ "Canadians earn 2013 President's Award". milb.com. November 4, 2013. Retrieved November 5, 2013.
  10. ^ "Northwest League Attendance | MiLB.com Stats | The Official Site of Minor League Baseball". MiLB.com. Retrieved 2017-06-19.
  11. ^ @vancanadians (11 April 2017). "We have the best fans in @MiLB! Come celebrate winning the 2016 @esurance Home Field Advantage Award with your hometown team today!" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  12. ^ "Canadians win fourth title in seven years". MiLB.com. Retrieved 2018-02-17.
  13. ^ "Vancouver Canadians on Twitter". Twitter. January 26, 2018. Retrieved January 26, 2018.
  14. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2000)". thebaseballcube.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  15. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2001)". thebaseballcube.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  16. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2002)". thebaseballcube.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  17. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2003)". thebaseballcube.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  18. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2004)". thebaseballcube.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  19. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2005)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  20. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2006)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  21. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2007)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  22. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2008)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  23. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2009)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  24. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2010)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  25. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2011)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  26. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2012)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  27. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2013)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  28. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2014)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  29. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2015)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  30. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2016)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  31. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2017)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  32. ^ "Canadians Attendance (2018)". MiLB.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  33. ^ "Vancouver Canadians jump to Sportsnet 650, get TV games in the deal". The Province. 2018-10-23. Retrieved 2019-06-29.

External links

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List of Oakland Athletics minor league affiliates

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The Athletics have been affiliated with the Double-A Midland RockHounds of the Texas League since 1999, making it the longest-running active affiliation in the organization among teams not owned by the Athletics. Their newest affiliate is the Las Vegas Aviators of the Pacific Coast League which became the Athletics' Triple-A club in 2019. The longest affiliation in team history was the 30-year relationship with the Class A-Advanced California League's Modesto A's from 1975 to 2004.Geographically, Oakland's closest domestic affiliate is the Stockton Ports of the Class A-Advanced California League which is approximately 51 miles (82 km) away. Oakland's furthest domestic affiliate is the Vermont Lake Monsters of the Class A Short Season New York–Penn League some 2,554 miles (4,110 km) away.

List of Toronto Blue Jays minor league affiliates

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The Blue Jays have been affiliated with the Double-A New Hampshire Fisher Cats of the Eastern League since 2004, making it the longest-running active affiliation in the organization among teams not owned by the Blue Jays. Their newest affiliate is the Buffalo Bisons of the International League which became the Blue Jays' Triple-A club in 2013. The longest affiliation in team history was the 31-year relationship with the Triple-A International League's Syracuse Chiefs from 1978 to 2008.Geographically, Toronto's closest affiliate is the Buffalo Bisons of the Triple-A International League which is approximately 59 miles (95 km) away. Toronto's furthest affiliate is the Vancouver Canadians of the Class A Short Season Northwest League some 2,087 miles (3,359 km) away.

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Sacramento River Cats

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