Urs Hölzle

Urs Hölzle (German pronunciation: [ˈʊrs ˈhœltslɛ]) is a Swiss software engineer and technology executive. He is the senior vice president of technical infrastructure and Google Fellow at Google. As Google's eighth employee and its first VP of Engineering, he has shaped much of Google's development processes and infrastructure.[1]

Urs Hölzle
Alma materETH Zurich
Stanford University
Scientific career
InstitutionsUniversity of California, Santa Barbara
Google
ThesisAdaptive optimization for Self: Reconciling High Performance with Exploratory Programming (1994)
Doctoral advisorDavid Ungar
John L. Hennessy

Career

Before joining Google, he was an Associate Professor of Computer Science at University of California, Santa Barbara. He received a master's degree in computer science from ETH Zurich in 1988 and was awarded a Fulbright scholarship that same year. In 1994, he earned a Ph.D. from Stanford University, where his research focused on programming languages and their efficient implementation. Via a startup founded by Hölzle, David Griswold, and Lars Bak (see Strongtalk), that work then evolved into a high-performance Java VM named HotSpot, acquired by Sun's JavaSoft unit in 1997 and from there became Sun's premier JVM implementation.[2]

He led the design of Google's very efficient data centers which are said to use less than half the power of a conventional data center.[3] In 2014 he received The Economist's Innovation Award for his datacenter efficiency work.[4] With Luiz Barroso, he wrote The Datacenter as a Computer: An Introduction to the Design of Warehouse-Scale Machines.[5] In June 2007, he introduced the Climate Savers Computing Initiative together with Pat Gelsinger which aims to halve the power consumption of desktop computers and servers.

Also in 2007, he and Luiz Barroso wrote "The Case for Energy Proportional Computing" which argued that servers should be designed to use power in proportion to their current load, because they spend much of their time being only partially loaded. This paper is often credited for spurring CPU manufacturers to make their designs much more energy efficient.[6] Today, energy proportional computing has become a standard goal for both server and mobile uses.

In 2011, Hölzle announced a shift in Google.org's alternative energy investment strategy, dropping development of "solar thermal" electricity (for example with BrightSource Energy) because ST was not keeping pace with the rapid price decline of another solar technology – photovoltaics.[7]

In 2012, Hölzle introduced "the G-Scale Network" on which Google had begun managing its petabyte-scale internal data flow via OpenFlow, an open source software system jointly devised by scientists at Stanford and the UC Berkeley and promoted by the Open Networking Foundation. The internal data flow, or network, is distinct from the one that connects users to Google services (Search, Gmail, YouTube, etc.). In the process of describing the new network, Hölzle also confirmed more about Google's making of its own networking equipment like routers and switches for G-Scale; and said the company wanted, by being open about the changes, to "encourage the industry — hardware, software and ISP's — to look down this path and say, 'I can benefit from this.'" He said network utilization was nearing 100% of capacity, a dramatic efficiency improvement.[8]

He is credited for creating Google Gulp for April Fool's Day in 2005.

He is member of the National Academy of Engineering,[9] and a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (2009)[10], the AAAS (2017)[11], and the Swiss Academies of Arts and Sciences.[12] He was 2009-2018 board member of the US World Wildlife Fund.[13] He is member of the National Council of WWF-US.[14]

References

  1. ^ "I'm Feeling Lucky", Doug Edwards, Houghton Mifflin 2012
  2. ^ Google: Management Team
  3. ^ Google's Green Datacenter
  4. ^ Economist, December 6, 2014
  5. ^ Luiz André Barroso and Urs Hölzle, The Datacenter as a Computer: An Introduction to the Design of Warehouse-Scale Machines, Morgan & Claypool, 2009. ISBN 9781598295573
  6. ^ "Server Efficiency: Aligning Energy Use With Workloads", Datacenter Knowledge, June 12, 2012
  7. ^ "Google cans concentrated solar power project", REVE, November 24, 2011. Retrieved 2012-05-29.
  8. ^ Levy, Steven, "Going With the Flow: Google's Secret Switch to the Next Wave of Networking", Wired, April 17, 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-17.
  9. ^ > NAE press release
  10. ^ ACM Fellows>Urs Hoelzle, Association for Computing Machinery webpage.
  11. ^ AAAS 2017 Fellows, AAAS webpage.
  12. ^ Full members>Hölzle, Dr Urs, SATW webpage.
  13. ^ Urs Hölzle. WWF webpage.
  14. ^ National Council. WWF.

External links

AI Challenge

The AI Challenge was an international artificial intelligence programming contest started by the University of Waterloo Computer Science Club.

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Android Q

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BigQuery

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GData

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Google provides GData client libraries for Java, JavaScript, .NET, PHP, Python, and Objective-C.

G Suite Marketplace

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Google Behind the Screen

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Google Business Groups

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Google Dataset Search

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Google Dataset Search complements Google Scholar, the company's search engine for academic studies and reports.

Google Finance

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Google Forms

Google Forms is a survey administration app that is included in the Google Drive office suite along with Google Docs, Google Sheets, and Google Slides.

Forms features all of the collaboration and sharing features found in Docs, Sheets, and Slides.

Google Guice

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Guice allows implementation classes to be bound programmatically to an interface, then injected into constructors, methods or fields using an @Inject annotation. When more than one implementation of the same interface is needed, the user can create custom annotations that identify an implementation, then use that annotation when injecting it.

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Google The Thinking Factory

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Open Networking Foundation

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is a nonprofit trade organization, funded by companies such as Deutsche Telekom, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Verizon, and Yahoo! aimed at promoting networking through software-defined networking (SDN) and standardizing the OpenFlow protocol and related technologies. The standards-setting and SDN-promotion group was formed out of recognition that cloud computing will blur the distinctions between computers and networks.

The initiative was meant to speed innovation through simple software changes in telecommunications networks, wireless networks, data centers and other networking areas.By December 31, 2013, the organization had 123 member companies. By June 2014 ONF had grown to over 150 member companies including 24 start-up companies in software defined networking. Member companies include networking-equipment vendors, semiconductor companies, computer companies, software companies, telecom service providers, hyperscale data-center operators, and enterprise users.

Google's adoption of OpenFlow software was discussed by Urs Hölzle at a trade show promoting OpenFlow in April, 2012. Hölzle is the chairman ONF's board of directors, serving on the board along with representatives of the other five founding board members plus NTT Communications Corp and Goldman Sachs. Stanford University professor Nick McKeown and U.C. Berkeley professor Scott Shenker also serve on the board as founding directors representing themselves.In 2016 the ONF announced it would merge with the Open Networking Lab (ON.Lab). The resulting entity retained the ONF name in 2017.

Pocket Smalltalk

Pocket Smalltalk is a Smalltalk environment that runs in Microsoft Windows and cross-compiles on the Palm Pilot platform.

The resulting executables are usable on the Palm 3.5 platform and up.

Project Sunroof

Project Sunroof is a solar power initiative started by Google engineer Carl Elkin. The initiative's stated purpose is "mapping the planet's solar potential, one roof at a time."

Rajen Sheth

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Strongtalk

Strongtalk is a Smalltalk environment with optional static typing support. Strongtalk can make some compile time checks, and offer stronger type safety guarantees; this is the source of its name. It is non-commercial, though it was originally a commercial project developed by a small startup company named LongView Technologies (trading as Animorphic Systems).

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