Urban Shocker

Urban James Shocker (September 22, 1890 – September 9, 1928), born Urbain Jacques Shockcor in Cleveland, Ohio, was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees and St. Louis Browns from 1916 to 1928.

As a prelude to his major league career, Shocker spent most of the 1916 season demoted by the Yankees to the Toronto Maple Leafs (International League) of the International League for seasoning and to prove himself at which Shocker posted a marvelous 15–3 record and strung together 54 consecutive scoreless innings. His scoreless inning streak and 1.31 ERA for the campaign both still stand as International League records. He was called up by the Yankees and played with them through the 1917 season. That winter, Miller Huggins engineered a trade to the Browns which he very much came to regret, however Shocker rejoined Huggins and the Yankees in 1925.

The right-handed hurler had four consecutive 20-win seasons with the Browns in the early 1920s, during which he was one of the most dominant pitchers in baseball. Urban was the last Yankees pitcher to legally throw a spitball, as he and a handful of other pitchers were grandfathered into the practice after it was banned by baseball in 1920.

Shocker lived with a heart condition so severe some books say he had to sleep either sitting or standing up. By the early fall of 1927, he was too ill to maintain his place in the starting lineup.

His career totals for 412 games include a 187-117 record, a .615 winning percentage, 317 games started, 200 complete games, 28 shutouts, 72 games finished, 25 saves, and an ERA of 3.17 in 2,681.2 innings pitched. He compiled a career .209 batting average (167-798) with 89 runs scored and 70 RBI. He was a good fielding pitcher in his era, committing only 15 errors in 769 total chances for a .980 fielding percentage.

After his release from the Yankees in 1928, Shocker entered an exhibition tournament in Denver. He pitched in one game on August 6, 1928 against a team from Cheyenne, Wyoming and fared poorly in that outing.

Around this time, he contracted pneumonia and was hospitalized shortly thereafter. He died in Denver as the result of heart failure exacerbated by the disease.

Urban Shocker
Urban Shocker
Pitcher
Born: September 22, 1890
Cleveland, Ohio
Died: September 9, 1928 (aged 38)
Denver, Colorado
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 24, 1916, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
May 30, 1928, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Win–loss record187–117
Earned run average3.17
Strikeouts983
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

1916 New York Yankees season

The 1916 New York Yankees season was the 14th season for the Yankees in New York, and the 16th overall for the franchise. The team finished with a record of 80–74, finishing 11 games behind the American League champion Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Bill Donovan. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds.

1917 New York Yankees season

The 1917 New York Yankees season was the 15th season for the Yankees in New York, and the 17th season overall for the franchise. The team finished with a record of 71–82, finishing 28½ games behind the American League champion Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Bill Donovan. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds.

1918 St. Louis Browns season

The 1918 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 58 wins and 64 losses.

1919 St. Louis Browns season

The 1919 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 67 wins and 72 losses.

1921 St. Louis Browns season

The 1921 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing third in the American League with a record of 83 wins and 73 losses.

1922 Major League Baseball season

The 1922 Major League Baseball season.

1922 St. Louis Browns season

The 1922 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns winning 93 games, the only time in franchise history that the Browns topped the 90 win plateau. In the American League standings, the Browns finished in second place behind the New York Yankees. The Browns set a franchise record with 712,918 fans coming to watch the games. This was approximately 100,000 higher than the previous high.

1922 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1922 throughout the world.

1923 St. Louis Browns season

The 1923 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 74 wins and 78 losses.

1924 St. Louis Browns season

The 1924 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 4th in the American League with a record of 74 wins and 78 losses. This was George Sisler's first season as manager.

1925 New York Yankees season

The 1925 New York Yankees season was the team's 23rd season in New York and its 25th overall. The team finished with a record of 69–85, in 7th place, 30 games behind the Washington Senators. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

This season was marred by Babe Ruth's mysterious illness that kept him out a good portion of the season. It was the club's lowest finish, in both percentage and place in the standings, since their 7th-place finish in 1913. It was also the first time they had finished below .500 since 1918. The Yankees would regroup and it would be 40 years before they would finish below .500 again.

1926 New York Yankees season

The 1926 New York Yankees season was the team's 24th season in New York, and its 26th season overall. The team finished with a record of 91–63, winning their fourth pennant, finishing three games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they lost in 7 games to the St. Louis Cardinals, with the series ending with Babe Ruth being caught stealing second in the bottom of the 9th inning in game 7.

1927 New York Yankees season

The 1927 New York Yankees season was their 25th season. The team finished with a record of 110–44, winning their fifth pennant and finishing 19 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics and were tied for first or better for the whole season. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Pittsburgh Pirates. This Yankees team was known for their feared lineup, which was nicknamed "Murderers' Row", and is widely considered to be the greatest baseball team in MLB history.

1928 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 1928 season was their 26th season. The team finished with a record of 101–53, winning their sixth pennant, finishing 2.5 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the St. Louis Cardinals. Pitcher Urban Shocker died in September due to complications from pneumonia.

Canadian League

The Canadian League was a minor league baseball league that operated in Canada in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

The first version of the league operated in 1885, then from 1896–1899, becoming a Class-D league in 1899 and merging into the International League in 1900.

In 1905 there was a four-team class D loop known as the Canadian League. Another league using that title ran from 1911 through 1915 — it was originally ranked a D league as well, moved to a C rating a year later and in 1914 got a B classification. Frank Shaughnessy managed the Ottawa team from 1913 to 1915.

The league briefly returned in 1905 and then operated again from 1911 to 1915.

Les Bell

Lester Rowland Bell (December 14, 1901 – December 26, 1985) was an American professional baseball player, a third baseman who appeared in 896 games played in the Major Leagues from 1923 to 1931 for the St. Louis Cardinals, Boston Braves and Chicago Cubs. A native of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, he threw and batted right-handed, stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighed 165 pounds (75 kg).

Bell's professional career began in 1921 in minor league baseball. After trials with the Cardinals in both 1923 and 1924, he supplanted Howard Freigau and Specs Toporcer to become the Redbirds' regular third baseman in 1925 and finished third on the team in runs batted in with 88, behind only Baseball Hall of Famers Rogers Hornsby and Jim Bottomley.

Then in 1926 Bell reached career bests in hits (189), home runs (17), runs batted in (100) and batting average (.325). He finished in the top five in the National League in hits, slugging percentage (.518), OPS (.901), total bases (301), home runs, extra-base hits (64) and RBI. He also was among the NL leaders in strikeouts (62) and errors committed by a third baseman (22). Bell ranked sixth in the National League Most Valuable Player Award polling as the Cardinals won their first pennant and World Series championship. In the 1926 World Series against the New York Yankees, he played in all seven games and collected seven hits, including a two-run homer in Game 6 off Urban Shocker that salted away a 10–2 St. Louis triumph.

In 1927, however, Bell played in only 115 games and his production fell off considerably, and in March 1928 he was traded to the Braves for fellow third baseman Andy High. Bell was a regular for Boston in both 1928 and 1929, but the Braves placed him on waivers after the 1929 campaign and he was claimed by the Cubs. He played two more big-league seasons in back-up roles before he returned to the minor leagues, where he would spend eight seasons as manager of his hometown Harrisburg Senators of the Class B Interstate League.

During his nine-year Major League career, Les Bell collected 938 hits, with 184 doubles and 49 triples accompanying his 66 home runs.

List of Baltimore Orioles team records

This is a list of team records for the Baltimore Orioles baseball franchise. Records include when the franchise was the Brewers and Browns.

List of St. Louis Browns Opening Day starting pitchers

The St. Louis Browns were a Major League Baseball team that played in St. Louis, Missouri from 1902 through 1953. The franchise moved from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where it was known as the Milwaukee Brewers, after the 1901 season. It moved to Baltimore, Maryland after the 1953 season, where it became known as the Baltimore Orioles. The Browns played their home games at Sportsman's Park. They played in the American League. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Browns used 35 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 52 seasons. The Browns won 26 of those games against 25 losses in those Opening Day starts. They also played one tie game.Urban Shocker and Ned Garver had the most Opening Day starts for the Browns, with four apiece. Harry Howell, Carl Weilman, Sam Gray and Bobo Newsom each had three Opening Day starts for the Browns. The other pitchers with multiple Opening Day starts for the Browns were Red Donahue, Jack Powell and Lefty Stewart. The Browns won three of both Shocker's and Garver's Opening Day starts, more than any other Browns' pitchers. The Browns lost two of Weilman's Opening Day starts. They did not lose more than one Opening Day game started by any other pitcher.

Although over their history the Browns won only one more Opening Day game than they lost, they did have a nine-game winning streak in Opening Day games from 1937 through 1945. That winning streak immediately followed their longest losing streak in Opening Day games, which was five losses from 1932 through 1936.

The Browns' first game in St. Louis was played on April 23, 1902 against the Cleveland Indians at Sportsman's Park. Their Opening Day starting pitcher for that game was Red Donahue. The Browns won the game 5–2. The Browns advanced to the World Series only once during their time in St. Louis, in 1944. In their only postseason appearance, they lost the 1944 World Series to their Sportsman's Park cotennant St. Louis Cardinals, four games to two. Jack Kramer was the Browns Opening Day starting pitcher that season. The Browns won that game.The franchise's only major league Opening Day game as the Milwaukee Brewers was played on April 25, 1901 against the Detroit Tigers in Detroit. Pink Hawley was the Brewers' Opening Day starting pitcher. The Brewers lost the game by a score of 14–13.

Urban (name)

Urban as a given name or surname may refer to:

Any of several men with Urban as a given name:

Pope Urban (disambiguation)

Urban Blitz, English rock musician

Urban Hansen, Danish politician

Urban of Langres, 4th-century French saint and bishop

Urban (bishop of Llandaff), Welsh bishop (1076–1134)

Urban of Macedonia, legendary 1st-century apostle bishop

Urban Meyer, American football coach

Urban Priol, German comedian

Urban Shocker, American baseball pitcherAny of several people with Urban as a surname:

Adolf Urban, German footballer

Amanda Urban, literary agent

Benjamin D'Urban, colonial administrator

Charles Urban, film producer

Damir Urban, musician

Friedrich Maria Urban (1878–1964), Austrian psychologist

Gábor Urbán, Hungarian footballer

Gasper Urban, American football player

George Urban, journalist

Glen L. Urban, professor

Ignatz Urban German botanist

Jan Urban, Polish footballer and manager

Jerheme Urban American Football wide receiver

Jerzy Urban, Polish journalist and former political (communist) press secretary

Joseph Urban, Austrian artist and architect

Karl Urban, New Zealand actor

Keith Urban, Australian country singer

Marcus Urban, German football (soccer) player and diversity adviser

Mark Urban, British journalist

Matt Urban, military officer

Milo Urban, Slovak writer

Miloš Urban, Czech writer

Peter Urban (translator), German translator and writer

Shirley M. Frye (née Urban), American mathematics educator

Stuart Urban, film and television director

Tim Urban, American singer

Miguel Urbán, Spanish politician

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.