Urban Odson

Urban Leroy Odson (November 17, 1918 – June 22, 1986) was an American football tackle in the National Football League who played 44 games for the Green Bay Packers (1946–1949). In 1942, the Green Bay Packers used the 9th pick in the 1st round of the 1942 NFL Draft to sign Odson out of the University of Minnesota. Odson, a consensus All-American, starred on two undefeated NCAA National Championship teams for the Golden Gophers (1940 and 1941). Odson was selected to play in the 1942 College All-Star game on August 28, 1942 in front of 101,103 spectators against the Chicago Bears at Soldier Field in Chicago. Odson also was selected to play in the East-West Shrine All Star game. Odson entered the Navy and played for the legendary World War II Great Lakes football teams that played exhibition games against pro teams. Ensign Odson is listed on the Football and America: World War II Honor Roll at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. After serving a tour in the Pacific theater aboard USS Amsterdam, Odson went on to play under Curly Lambeau for four seasons with the Packers and left the Packers after the 1949 season. After brief stops with Chicago and Baltimore in 1950 he joined the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League for one season.

Urban Odson
Born:November 17, 1918
Clark, South Dakota
Died:June 22, 1986 (aged 67)
Rapid City, South Dakota
Career information
Position(s)Tackle
CollegeMinnesota
NFL draft1942 / Round: 1 / Pick: 9
Career history
As player
1946–1949Green Bay Packers
Career highlights and awards
Awardsconsensus first team All American 1940, second team All American 1941, All Big Ten first team 1940
HonorsMember of South Dakota Sports Hall of Fame, Member of the University of Minnesota "M" Club Athletic Hall of Fame

References

External links

1940 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1940 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) for the 1940 Big Ten Conference football season.

1940 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1940 Big Ten Conference football season was the 45th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1940 college football season. The University of Chicago terminated its football program after the 1939 season, leaving only nine conference members fielding football teams. However, Chicago remained a member of the conference and participated in other sports, and the conference remained known generally as the Big Ten.

The 1940 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team under head coach Bernie Bierman compiled a perfect 8–0 record, outscored opponents by a combined total of 154 to 71, won the Big Ten championship, and was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll. Quarterback Bob Paffrath was selected as the team's most valuable player. Tackle Urban Odson and halfback George Franck were consensus first-team picks for the 1940 College Football All-America Team.

Michigan, under head coach Fritz Crisler, compiled a 7–1 record, led the conference in both scoring offense (24.5 points per game) and scoring defense (4.3 points per game), and finished the season ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll. The team's sole setback was a 7–6 loss on the road against Minnesota. Halfback Tom Harmon was a unanimous first-team All-American and the winner of the Heisman Trophy, the Maxwell Award, the Chicago Tribune Silver Football, and the AP's male athlete of the year award.

Northwestern, under head coach Pappy Waldorf, finished in third place in the Big Ten with a 6–2 record and was ranked No. 8 in the final AP Poll. Northwestern's two losses were to No. 1 Minnesota (by one point) and No. 3 Michigan (by seven points). Northwestern tackle Alf Bauman was a consensus first-team All-American.

1940 College Football All-America Team

The 1940 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1940. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1940 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the United Press (UP), (4) the All-America Board (AAB), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News (SN).

Michigan halfback (and Heisman Trophy winner) Tom Harmon, Texas A&M fullback John Kimbrough, and Tennessee guard Bob Suffridge were the only three unanimous first-team All-Americans chosen by all nine official selectors.

1940 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1940 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1940 Big Ten Conference football season. In their ninth year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled an undefeated 8–0 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 154 to 71.The team was selected national champion by ten NCAA-designated major selectors in Associated Press, Berryman, Boand, DeVold, Dickinson, Football Research, Houlgate, Litkenhous, National Championship Foundation, Sagarin, Sagarin (ELO-Chess) The team did not play in a bowl game.

Tackle Urban Odson was named an All-American by Liberty. Halfback George Franck was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation, Associated Press, United Press International, Look Magazine and Collier's. Franck placed third in voting for the Heisman Trophy. Franck and Odson were also named All-Big Ten first team.Quarterback Bob Paffrath received the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 234,990, which averaged to 46,998. The season high for attendance was against Michigan.

1941 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1941 Big Ten Conference football season was the 46th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1941 college football season.

The 1941 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, led by head coach Bernie Bierman, compiled a perfect 8–0 record, led the conference in both scoring offense and scoring defense, was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll, and won the program's second consecutive national championship. Halfback Bruce Smith was a consensus All-American and won the 1941 Heisman Trophy. Tackle Dick Wildung was also a consensus first-team All-American.

Michigan, under head coach Fritz Crisler, compiled a 6–1–1 record, outscored opponents 147 to 41, and was ranked No. 5 in the final AP Poll. Fullback Bob Westfall was selected as a consensus first-team player on the 1941 College Football All-America Team.

Ohio State, under head coach Paul Brown, compiled a 6–1–1 record, outscored opponents 167 to 110, and was ranked No. 13 in the final AP Poll.

1941 College Football All-America Team

The 1941 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1941. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1941 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News.

Harvard center Endicott Peabody, who won the 1941 Knute Rockne Award, was the only player to be unanimously named to the first team of all nine official selectors. Dick Wildung of Minnesota and Bob Westfall of Michigan each received eight official first-team designations. Bruce Smith of Minnesota won the 1941 Heisman Trophy and received seven official first-team nominations.

1942 Green Bay Packers season

The 1942 Green Bay Packers season was their 24th season overall and their 22nd season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–2–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a second-place finish in the Western Conference.

1942 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1942 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1942 Big Ten Conference football season. The 1942 team compiled a record of 7–3 and was ranked No. 9 in the final Associated Press poll. The team's line that included Albert Wistert, Merv Pregulman, Julius Franks (U-M's first African-American All-American), Elmer Madar, Robert Kolesar, Bill Pritula and Philip Sharpe and was known as the "Seven Oak Posts."

1942 NFL Draft

The 1942 National Football League Draft was held on December 22, 1941, at the Palmer House Hotel in Chicago.

1946 Green Bay Packers season

The 1946 Green Bay Packers season was their 28th season overall and their 26th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–5 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning them a third-place finish in the Western Conference.

1947 Green Bay Packers season

The 1947 Green Bay Packers season was their 29th season overall and their 27th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–5–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a third-place finish in the Western Conference.

1948 Green Bay Packers season

The 1948 Green Bay Packers season was their 30th season overall and their 28th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 3–9 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a fourth-place finish in the Western Conference.

1949 Green Bay Packers season

The 1949 Green Bay Packers season was their 31st season overall and their 29th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 2–10 record under coach Curly Lambeau for a fifth-place finish in the Western Conference. This was the 31st and final season the Packers played under Lambeau, who resigned and then coached the Chicago Cardinals in 1950 and 1951 and the Washington Redskins in 1952 and 1953.

The 1949 season was also the final year for blue and gold jerseys, as the Packers switched to kelly green and yellow in 1950 under new coach Gene Ronzani, a graduate of Marquette University.

Clark, South Dakota

Clark is a city in Clark County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 1,139 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Clark County.The Clark County Courier is a weekly newspaper published in Clark. Dakota Style potato chips are produced on a farm near Clark.

Green Bay Packers draft history

This page is a list of the Green Bay Packers NFL Draft selections. The Packers have participated in every NFL draft since it began in 1936, in which they made Russ Letlow their first-ever selection.

List of Green Bay Packers first-round draft picks

The Green Bay Packers joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1921, two years after their original founding by Curly Lambeau. They participated in the first ever NFL draft in 1936 and selected Russ Letlow, a guard from the University of San Francisco. The team's most recent first round selection was Jaire Alexander, a cornerback from Louisville in the 2018 NFL Draft. The Packers have selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice, choosing future Hall of Fame halfback Paul Hornung in 1957 and quarterback Randy Duncan in 1959. They have also selected the second overall pick three times and the third overall pick once. The team's eight selections from the University of Minnesota are the most chosen by the Packers from one university.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft officially known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting" but more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Playoff teams will not pick before a non playoff team when determining the initial draft order. So a division winner with a losing record would have a lower pick after a 10-6 team that didn't make the playoffs. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Minnesota Golden Gophers in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Minnesota Golden Gophers football players in the NFL Draft.

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