Ural Airlines Flight 178

Ural Airlines Flight 178 is a Ural Airlines scheduled passenger flight from Moscow–Zhukovsky to Simferopol, Crimea. On 15 August 2019, the Airbus A321 operating the flight carried 226 passengers and seven crew. The flight suffered a bird strike after taking off from Zhukovsky and crash landed in a cornfield, 5 kilometres (3.1 mi; 2.7 nmi) past the airport. All on board survived; 74 people sustained injuries, but none were severe.

Ural Airlines Flight 178
Photograph of aircraft involved
VQ-BOZ, the aircraft involved in the accident, seen in 2013
Accident
Date15 August 2019
SummaryCrash-landed following bird strike resulting in dual engine failure
SiteNear Zhukovsky International Airport, Moscow, Russia
55°30′43″N 38°15′07″E / 55.512°N 38.252°ECoordinates: 55°30′43″N 38°15′07″E / 55.512°N 38.252°E
Aircraft
Aircraft typeAirbus A321-211
OperatorUral Airlines
IATA flight No.U6178
ICAO flight No.SVR178
Call signSVERDLOVSK AIR 178
RegistrationVQ-BOZ
Flight originZhukovsky International Airport, Moscow, Russia
DestinationSimferopol International Airport, Simferopol, Crimea
Occupants233
Passengers226
Crew7
Fatalities0
Injuries74
Survivors233 (all)

Accident

External video
Footage shortly after takeoff
Footage during landing
Aerial footage of landing area
Footage of the landing site and plane shot by a passenger after landing

The aircraft suffered a bird strike shortly after takeoff from Zhukovsky International Airport, Moscow, Russia, bound for Simferopol International Airport, Simferopol, Crimea.[1] A passenger recorded the plane's descent into a cornfield after a flock of gulls struck both CFM56-5 engines.[2] The first bird strike caused a complete loss of power in the left engine. A second bird strike caused the right engine to produce insufficient thrust to maintain flight.[3]

The pilots decided to turn off both engines and opted to make an emergency landing in a cornfield near the airport runway.[4] The aircraft made a hard landing in the cornfield 2.8 nautical miles (5.2 km) from Zhukovsky International Airport.[3] The pilot chose not to lower the landing gear in order to skid more effectively over the corn.[5]

Everyone on board the flight survived.[2] There have been differing reports on the number of injuries sustained as the criteria for counting a person as "injured" are not overly strict. According to some reports, 55 people received medical attention at the scene. 29 people were taken to hospital, of whom 23 were injured. Six people were admitted as in-patients.[6][7][8] The number of injuries was finally fixed at 74, none of whom was severely injured.[9] All passengers were offered 100,000 (US$1,714) as accident compensation.[10]

Aircraft

The aircraft was an Airbus A321-211, registered in Bermuda as VQ-BOZ, msn 2117. It was built in 2003 for MyTravel Airways (as G-OMYA), who decided not to accept it; it was then transferred to Cyprus Turkish Airlines as TC-KTD. It then operated for AtlasGlobal as TC-ETR in 2010, and Solaris Airlines in 2011 as EI-ERU, before being delivered to Ural Airlines in 2011 as VQ-BOZ.[1][11][12]

The aircraft was damaged beyond repair in the accident[3] and the airline announced that it would be cut up in situ to be scrapped, in an operation scheduled to commence on 23 August 2019.[13] The accident represents the sixth hull-loss of an Airbus A321.[14]

Crew

The pilot in command was 41-year-old Damir Yusupov who graduated from the Buguruslan Flight School of Civil Aviation, in Buguruslan, Russia, in 2013. He has also received a degree in Air Navigation from the Ulyanovsk Institute of Civil Aviation, in Ulyanovsk, Russia. At the time of the accident, he had over 3,000 hours of flight time.[15]

The co-pilot was 23-year-old Georgy Murzin who also graduated from the Buguruslan Flight School of Civil Aviation, in 2017.[16] At the time of the accident, he had over 600 hours of flight time.[15]

There were five flight attendants on board.[3]

Proliferation of birds near airport

The proliferation of birds near Moscow–Zhukovsky is attributed to illegal waste dumps.[17] The deployed bird control measures are overwhelmed and insufficient.[18] In 2012, the management of one of the waste sites had been sued in Zhukovsky district court, alleging that "the waste sorting facilities attract massive numbers of birds due to significant content of edible refuse, and with the site located at the distance of 2 km (1.2 mi; 1.1 nmi) from the airport runway this could lead to collisions between birds and aircraft, threatening human life and limb". The court did not find sufficient grounds to rule in favor of plaintiffs and their demands to enjoin the defendants from sorting or storing household waste at the specified site.[19]

As of 2019, this site is no longer sorting or storing household waste, instead compacting it and transferring it further for disposal; the operations, however, are conducted outdoors.[17]

A Zhukovsky air traffic controller declared:[18]

We issue warnings to every departing aircraft. The birds come to sit on the runway ⁠— ⁠there's the river and the dump nearby, so they're here constantly.

In September 2019, Rosaviatsiya proposed to work with law enforcement authorities to check the legality of waste dumps near airports, and will also examine the frequency of scheduled and unscheduled inspections of airports for the presence of birds.[20]

Reactions

Shortly after the accident, Ural Airlines released a statement on Twitter stating: "Flight U6178 Zhukovsky-Simferopol on departure from Zhukovsky sustained multiple bird strikes to the aircraft engines. The aircraft made an emergency landing. There were no injuries to the passengers and crew."[21] The airline praised the professionalism of the pilots.[8]

On social media, immediate comparisons[22] were made between the accident and the "Miracle on the Hudson" incident involving US Airways Flight 1549.

The pilot in command, Damir Yusupov, and first officer, Georgy Murzin, were awarded the honorary title of Hero of the Russian Federation; the other crew members were decorated with the Order of Courage.[23]

While being praised in Russia, the crew of the aircraft was entered into the blacklist of Ukrainian NGO Myrotvorets ("Peacemaker"), which accused them of "knowingly and on multiple occasions making illegal crossings of the state border of Ukraine".[24][25]

Author of the first Russian disaster movie "Air Crew" Alexander Mitta announced plans to make a film based on the events of Flight 178.[26]

Investigation

The Interstate Aviation Committee (Russian: Межгосударственный авиационный комитет, МАК) opened an investigation into the accident. The investigation is being assisted by Rosaviatsiya, the British Air Accidents Investigation Branch, and the French Bureau d'Enquêtes et d'Analyses pour la Sécurité de l'Aviation Civile. The cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder were both successfully recovered and their data downloaded.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "VQ-BOZ accident details". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  2. ^ a b Cole, Brendan. "Russian Plane With 234 People On Board Crash-lands in Cornfield After Birds Fly Into Engine Causing Fire, 23 Injured". Newsweek. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e Hradecky, Simon. "Accident: Ural A321 at Moscow on Aug 15th 2019, bird strike into both engines forces landing in corn field". Aviation Herald. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  4. ^ Nowack, Timo. "A321 von Ural Airlines landet in Maisfeld" [A321 of Ural Airlies lands in cornfield] (in German). Aerotelegraph. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  5. ^ "Ural Airlines A321 Bird Strikes Into Both Engines on Departure". samchui.com. 15 August 2019. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  6. ^ "Russia bird strike: 23 injured after plane hits gulls and crash-lands". BBC News Online. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  7. ^ "Passengers injured in emergency landing after Russian jet hits birds". CBS News. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  8. ^ a b Fox, Kara. "Russian jet crash-lands in field outside Moscow after striking flock of gulls". CNN. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  9. ^ "Число пострадавших при посадке A321 в поле возросло до 74 человек" [The number of injuries during the landing of A321 in the field reached 74]. ria.ru. 15 August 2019. Retrieved 19 August 2019.
  10. ^ "Заявление на получение компенсации пассажирам рейса U6 178 Жуковский-Симферополь" [Application for compensation to passengers of flight U6 178 Zhukovsky-Simferopol]. www.uralairlines.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 2019-08-19.
  11. ^ "Ural Airlines VQ-BOZ (Airbus A321 - MSN 2117) (Ex TC-ETR TC-KTD ) | Airfleets aviation". www.airfleets.net. Retrieved 2019-08-19.
  12. ^ "VQ-BOZ Ural Airlines Airbus A321-200". www.planespotters.net. Retrieved 2019-08-19.
  13. ^ Kaminski-Morrow, David (22 August 2019). "Field-landing Ural A321 to be cut up and removed". Flightglobal.com.
  14. ^ Ranter, Harro. "Aviation Safety Network > ASN Aviation Safety Database > Aircraft type index > Airbus A321". aviation-safety.net. Retrieved 2019-08-27.
  15. ^ a b ""Они каждый у меня — граненый бриллиант". Об экипаже, сумевшем спасти сотни жизней" ["Each of them is a faceted diamond". About the crew, who managed to save hundreds of lives]. ТАСС (in Russian). Retrieved 2019-08-19.
  16. ^ "Выпускники Бугурусланского лётного училища стали героями "второго чуда на Гудзоне"" [Graduates of the Buguruslan Flight School became the heroes of the “Second Miracle on the Hudson”]. orenburzhie.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 2019-08-19.
  17. ^ a b "Свалки и стаи птиц: что показала проверка территории вокруг аэродрома Жуковского" [Landfills and flocks of birds: as shown by a check of the territory around the Zhukovsky airfield] (in Russian). Retrieved 2019-08-18.
  18. ^ a b "Как владельцы свалок у аэропорта Жуковский связаны с губернатором Подмосковья" [How landfill owners at Zhukovsky airport are connected with the governor of the Moscow region] (in Russian). 2019-08-15. Retrieved 2019-08-19.
  19. ^ "Легкая мишень для чаек" [Easy target for seagulls]. Новая газета (in Russian). 2019-08-17. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  20. ^ Kaminski-Morrow, David (5 September 2019). "Russian authorities to probe airports' exposure to bird risk". Flightglobal.com.
  21. ^ @Ural_Air_Lines (15 August 2019). "На рейсе U6178 Жуковский-Симферополь при вылете из Жуковского произошло многочисленное попадание птиц в двигатели самолета. Самолет совершил вынужденную посадку. Пассажиры и экипаж не пострадали" [Flight U6178 Zhukovsky-Simferopol on departure from Zhukovsky sustained multiple bird strikes to the aircraft engines. The aircraft made an emergency landing. There were no injuries to the passengers and crew.] (Tweet) (in Russian) – via Twitter.
  22. ^ "Russia hails miracle after plane makes emergency landing in a cornfield". CNBC. 2019-08-15. Retrieved 2019-08-30.
  23. ^ "Путин присвоил звания Героев России летчикам самолета, совершившего посадку под Жуковским" [Putin awarded the title of the Heros of Russia to the pilots landed the aircraft near Zhukovsky] (in Russian). TASS. 2019-08-16. Retrieved 2019-08-16.
  24. ^ "Экипаж аварийно севшего в Подмосковье А321 внесли в базу "Миротворца"" [Crew of A321 which crash-landed in the Moscow Region added to the "Peacemaker" database]. RT на русском (in Russian). Retrieved 4 September 2019.
  25. ^ "Plane crash-lands after hitting flock of birds". BBC. 15 August 2019. Retrieved 4 September 2019.
  26. ^ "Это был бы мировой блокбастер" [It would be a global blockbuster] (in Russian). Komsomolskaya Pravda. 2019-08-15. Retrieved 2019-08-15.

External links

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2019 Indian Air Force An-32 crash

On 3 June 2019, an Antonov An-32 twin engine turboprop transport aircraft of the Indian Air Force en route from Jorhat Airport in Assam to Mechuka in Arunachal Pradesh lost contact with ground control about 33 minutes after takeoff. There were 13 people on board. After a week-long search operation, the wreckage with no survivors was found near Pari hills close to Gatte village in Arunachal Pradesh at the elevation of 12000 feet.

2019 New York City helicopter crash

On June 10, 2019, an Agusta A109E Power crashed onto the AXA Equitable Center on Seventh Avenue in Manhattan, New York City, which sparked a fire on the top of the building. The helicopter involved in the accident, N200BK, was destroyed. The only occupant, the pilot, Tim McCormack, died in the crash. The aircraft was privately owned at the time of the crash.The flight originated from the East 34th Street Heliport (FAA LID: 6N5) at approximately 1:32 PM EDT bound for Linden, New Jersey. At around 1:43 PM EDT on June 10, 2019, the helicopter, an Agusta A109E Power, registration N200BK, crashed on the roof of the AXA Equitable Center, sparking a fire on the top of the building. The first emergency call was made at 1:43 PM. The FDNY has considered the accident as a "hard landing." The fire on the top of the highrise was extinguished quickly.

After the accident, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio briefed the press, confirming a lack of further victims or apparent terroristic motive. The National Transportation Safety Board sent agents to investigate the accident. The accident prompted Mayor de Blasio to call for a ban on non-emergency helicopters flying over Manhattan. Former City Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe countered that the mayor had the authority to eliminate ninety percent of helicopter traffic by himself by eliminating the more than 200 daily tourist and charter flights from city-owned heliports.

2019 Northrop N-9M crash

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2019 Pakistan Army military plane crash

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2019 Saha Airlines Boeing 707 crash

On 14 January 2019, a Boeing 707 operated by Saha Airlines on a cargo flight crashed at Fath Air Base, near Karaj, Alborz Province in Iran. Fifteen of the 16 people on board were killed. This aircraft was also the last civil Boeing 707 in operation.

2019 Taplejung helicopter crash

On February 27, 2019, Air Dynasty's Eurocopter AS350 B3e carrying six passengers and one pilot was scheduled to travel on a domestic flight from Pathibhara Devi Temple in Taplejung to Chuhandanda in Tehrathum, Nepal. The aircraft crashed at approximately 1.30 p.m. (NPT) due to bad weather in Taplejung. All seven people on board died in the crash, including Nepal's Minister for Tourism and Civil Aviation Rabindra Prasad Adhikari.

2019 in Russia

Events in the year 2019 in Russia.

Angara Airlines Flight 200

Angara Airlines Flight 200 was a domestic scheduled flight from Ulan-Ude Airport to Nizhneangarsk Airport, Russia. On 27 June 2019, the Antonov An-24RV aircraft operating the flight suffered an engine failure on take-off. On returning to Nizhneangarsk, the aircraft departed the runway and collided with a building. All 43 passengers survived the crash whilst two of the four crew, the pilot and flight engineer, were killed.

Biman Bangladesh Airlines Flight 147

Biman Bangladesh Airlines Flight 147 was a scheduled flight from Shahjalal International Airport, Bangladesh to Dubai International Airport via Chittagong on 24 February 2019. The aircraft, a Biman Bangladesh Airlines Boeing 737-800, was hijacked 252 kilometres (157 mi) South-East of Dhaka by lonewolf terrorist Polash Ahmed. The flight performed emergency landing at the Shah Amanat International Airport in Chittagong. Ahmed was shot dead by Bangladeshi special forces. No casualties of passengers or crew were reported although one flight attendant was shot at.

Biman Bangladesh Airlines Flight 60

Biman Bangladesh Airlines Flight 60 was a scheduled international passenger flight from Dhaka Hazrat Shah Jalal International Airport, Bangladesh to Yangon International Airport, Myanmar. On May 8, 2019, the Bombardier Q400 aircraft, skidded off the runway upon landing, breaking into three sections. There were no fatalities, but 18 of the 28 passengers on board including 5 crew members were injured: the aircraft was also declared a hull loss, making it the tenth loss of a Q400 aircraft.

Ethiopian Airlines Flight 604

Ethiopian Airlines Flight 604 was a scheduled Addis Ababa–Bahir Dar–Asmara flight in which the aircraft caught fire during a belly landing at Bahir Dar Airport, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia, on 15 September 1988.

Flight 178

Flight 178 may refer to:

Air France Flight 178, crashed on 1 September 1953

Ural Airlines Flight 178, crashed on 15 August 2019

Hero of the Russian Federation

Hero of the Russian Federation (Russian: Герой Российской Федерации) is the highest honorary title of the Russian Federation. The title comes with a Gold Star medal, an insignia of honour that identifies recipients.

The title is awarded to persons for "service to the Russian state and nation, usually connected with a heroic feat of valour". The title is bestowed by decree of the president of the Russian Federation. Russian citizenship or being in the service of the Russian state is not obligatory.

The title was established in 1992 and, as of 2015, was awarded more than 970 times, of which more than 440 were posthumously.

Kukuruznik

Kukuruznik is a Russian word derived from "kukuruza", maize. It was used as a nickname for the following.

Polikarpov Po-2, a utility aircraft used extensively in agriculture

Antonov An-2, a purpose-built agricultural aircraft

Nikita Khrushchev, leader of the Soviet Union, known for indiscriminately introducing corn throughout the Soviet Union

List of accidents and incidents involving the Airbus A320 family

For the entire A320 family, 119 aviation accidents and incidents have occurred (the latest one being Ural Airlines Flight 178 on 15th of August 2019), including 36 hull loss accidents (the last one also being Ural Airlines Flight 178), and a total of 1393 fatalities in 17 fatal accidents (the most recent being EgyptAir Flight 804).Through 2015, the Airbus A320 family has experienced 0.12 fatal hull-loss accidents for every million takeoffs, and 0.26 total hull-loss accidents for every million takeoffs; one of the lowest fatality rates of any airliner.

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The grounding order was issued on 20 July and was due to run until 3 August, but was lifted early as CASA found there is no evidence for an unsafe condition, and the EASA said the wrecked aircraft had been exposed to aerodynamic loads beyond certification.

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