Uppermill

Uppermill is a village in Saddleworth—a civil parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, in Greater Manchester, England. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, it lies on the River Tame in a valley amongst the South Pennines with the Peak District National Park directly to the east, and is 4.5 miles (7.2 km) east of Oldham, and 11 miles (17.7 km) east-northeast of Manchester. Uppermill forms a continuous urban area with the neighbouring village of Dobcross—the two have a combined population of 7,500.[1]

Uppermill
Uppermill and Railway

View over Uppermill
Uppermill is located in Greater Manchester
Uppermill
Uppermill
Location within Greater Manchester
OS grid referenceSD938090
• London161 miles (261 km) SSE
Civil parish
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townOLDHAM
Postcode districtOL3
Dialling code01457
PoliceGreater Manchester
FireGreater Manchester
AmbulanceNorth West
EU ParliamentNorth West England
UK Parliament

History

Although there is evidence of Roman activity in the area,[2] the history of Uppermill is dominated by the expansion of wool and cotton spinning into the area during the Industrial Revolution, with the construction of several mills.

Demography

Dobcross/Uppermill compared
2001 UK census Dobcross/Uppermill[1] Oldham (borough)[3] England
Total population 7,475 217,273 49,138,831
White 98.3% 86.1 91%
Asian 0.6% 11.9 4.6%
Black 0.2% 0.6 2.3%

The villages of Uppermill and Dobcross were treated as a single entity by the Office for National Statistics in the 2001 United Kingdom Census. As such, there are no demographic statistics for the village on its own. The statistics given here are for the combined population of Uppermill and Dobcross, which are about half a mile apart.

At the 2001 census, the area had a population of 7,475. Its population density was 10,324 inhabitants per square mile (3,986/km2), with a 100 to 92.6 female-to-male ratio.[4] Of those over 16 years old, 22.5% were single (never married), 49.6% married, and 7.8% divorced.[5] The 3,225 households in the area included 27.7% one-person, 43.2% married couples living together, 8.1% were co-habiting couples, and 6.9% single parents with their children.[6] Of those aged 16–74, 21.1% had no academic qualifications, significantly below the averages of Oldham (37.7%) and England (28.9%).[7][8]

At the 2001 UK census, 79.6% of residents in the area reported themselves as being Christian, 0.3% Muslim, 0.3% Hindu, 0.2% Buddhist and 0.2% Jewish. The census recorded 13.3% as having no religion, 0.2% had an alternative religion and 6.0% did not state their religion.[9]

References

  1. ^ a b "Census 2001 Key Statistics - Urban area results by population size of urban area". ons.gov.uk. Office for National Statistics. 22 July 2004. KS06 Ethnic group Page white excel.png. Retrieved 22 April 2009.
  2. ^ "Bronze Age dagger retrieved near proposed windfarm". Stonepages.com. 14 February 2004. Retrieved 17 April 2008.
  3. ^ "Oldham Metropolitan Borough ethnic group". Statistics.gov.uk. Retrieved 22 April 2009.
  4. ^ "Census 2001 Key Statistics - Urban area results by population size of urban area". ons.gov.uk. Office for National Statistics. 22 July 2004. KS01 Usual resident population Page white excel.png. Retrieved 22 April 2009.
  5. ^ "Census 2001 Key Statistics - Urban area results by population size of urban area". ons.gov.uk. Office for National Statistics. 22 July 2004. KS04 Marital status Page white excel.png. Retrieved 22 April 2009.
  6. ^ "Census 2001 Key Statistics - Urban area results by population size of urban area". ons.gov.uk. Office for National Statistics. 22 July 2004. KS20 Household composition Page white excel.png. Retrieved 22 April 2009.
  7. ^ "Oldham Metropolitan Borough key statistics". Statistics.gov.uk. Retrieved 22 April 2009.
  8. ^ "Census 2001 Key Statistics - Urban area results by population size of urban area". ons.gov.uk. Office for National Statistics. 22 July 2004. KS13 Qualifications and students Page white excel.png. Retrieved 22 April 2009.
  9. ^ "Census 2001 Key Statistics - Urban area results by population size of urban area". ons.gov.uk. Office for National Statistics. 22 July 2004. KS07 Religion Page white excel.png. Retrieved 22 April 2009.

External links

Castleshaw

Castleshaw is a hamlet in the Saddleworth parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham in Greater Manchester, England. It lies amid the Pennines, 2.4 miles (3.9 km) north of Uppermill, 3 miles (4.8 km) west-southwest of Marsden, and 5.3 miles (8.5 km) east-northeast of Oldham.

Historically a part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, Castleshaw is most notable for the Castleshaw Roman fort, the remains of an ancient castrum. There are two reservoirs, Castleshaw upper reservoir and Castleshaw lower reservoir. In 2016, United Utilities reinforced the walls on the lower reservoir but had to drop water levels by 1m.

Delph

Delph (Old English (ge)delf a quarry) is a village in the Saddleworth civil parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, in Greater Manchester, England. Historically within the West Riding of Yorkshire, it lies amongst the Pennines on the River Tame below the village of Denshaw, 4.0 miles (6.4 km) east-northeast of Oldham, and 1.8 miles (2.9 km) north-northwest of Uppermill.

The centre of the village has barely changed from the 19th century when a number of small textile mills provided employment for the local community. There is a significant first century AD Roman fort at Castleshaw.

The village is home to one of the Saddleworth Whit Friday brass band contests, with in the region of seventy-five bands from across the UK and beyond marching down the main street at five-minute intervals on the evening of the contest which often continues into the early hours. In the village of Dobcross a Henry Livings memorial prize is open to bands who play on any of the morning's walks on Whit Friday.

It is also home to the Millgate Arts Centre, the home of the Saddleworth Players. This group puts on six plays a year, as well as hosting a number of other events throughout the year.

The main street running through the centre of Delph was used in some of the external shots of the 2001 feature film The Parole Officer, starring Steve Coogan, Om Puri and Jenny Agutter.

Delph was also used in the filming of the Whit Friday scene in the 1996 film Brassed Off.

Delph is mentioned in the song "This One's For Now" by the band Half Man Half Biscuit on their 2014 album Urge for Offal.

Diggle, Greater Manchester

Diggle is a village within the Saddleworth parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, in Greater Manchester, England. The village is situated on the moorlands of the Pennine hills.

Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it is located at one end of the restored Standedge Canal Tunnel, Britain's longest, deepest and highest canal tunnel. In the village there is a listed building, the Gate pub, a newsagent, and a post office/off-licence.

Diggle is home to Diggle F.C., an FA registered amateur football club which plays its home games at Churchill Playing Fields, Uppermill. It competes in the Huddersfield and District Association Football League.

Diggle railway station

Diggle railway station was a station that served the village of Diggle on the Huddersfield Line to the north of Uppermill. Immediately to the west of the Standedge tunnels, it was opened in 1849 along with the first rail tunnel and closed to passenger traffic in 1968. In its heyday, the station had platforms serving all four lines but little trace remains of it today—all of the buildings and much of platforms having been demolished (although the nearby signal box remains operational).

On 5 July 1923, an express passenger train was in a rear-end collision with a freight train. Four people were killed.Local residents have periodically campaigned for the station to be reopened. This has often been connected to proposals to fully reopen the Standedge Tunnels.In 2012, a renewed effort was launched by a local Liberal Democrat parish councillor. This was unsuccessful, as Transport for Greater Manchester concluded that much of the cited passenger demand would actually be abstracted from the existing station at nearby Greenfield.

Friezland

Friezland is a village in Saddleworth, in the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, Greater Manchester, England. It is situated four miles east of the town of Oldham.

Historically a part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, Friezland lies between the village of Grasscroft and nearby town of Mossley. Friezland is situated on the banks of the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, and has a church, a church hall and a primary school.

It is also the original home of Friezland Brass Band [1]. The band has now set up a base in neighbouring village Uppermill, Saddleworth.

Friezland railway station

Friezland Railway Station served the Hamlet of Friezland in Saddleworth until closure on 1 January 1917. It was built by the London and North Western Railway on its Micklehurst Line.

On 19 August 1909 a passenger train was derailed at Friezland. Both train crew were killed.The station closed for passenger traffic on 1 January 1917 but regular passenger traffic continued to pass through until 1964. Freight services to the station were withdrawn in 1965 and the line through the station was closed in 1966. The village is now served by Greenfield railway station.

Greater Manchester bus route 184

Greater Manchester bus route 184 is operated by First Greater Manchester. The service runs hourly Monday-Saturday daytime on its full route between Manchester and Huddersfield via Oldham.

The one hourly journey is complemented by an additional two journeys an hour between Uppermill and Manchester and one an hour between Grotton and Manchester. Combined with its sister service, route 180, which runs between Greenfield and Manchester, there are six buses an hour with a bus running every 10 minutes between Grotton and Manchester. During evenings, route 184 runs an hourly service between Uppermill and Manchester and during the day on Sundays, the service runs its full route every two hours. Some journeys run between Uppermill and Manchester

Huddersfield and District Association Football League

The Huddersfield and District Association League is a football competition based in the area Huddersfield, England. It was founded in 1898. The league has a total of four senior divisions and four reserve divisions. The highest senior division, Division One, sits at level 14 of the English football league system and is a feeder to the West Riding County Amateur Football League. The reserve divisions are not part of the league system.

The league currently has 52 teams during the 2017–18 season with three new teams joining this campaign. There are also four divisions of reserve teams compromising of 48 teams.

The most successful team in a single division since 2000, is Brackenhall United with 4 championships from 2000 to 2003. The most successful team in all divisions is Newsome, with six championships starting in the now-defunct Division Five during the 1999–2000 season and ending with the Division One championship during the 2006–07 season. Newsome again won the First Division title in the 2009–10 season and the 2014-15 season.

The league generally consists of teams around Huddersfield in West Yorkshire, however there are also a few teams located in Greater Manchester including Diggle, Uppermill 'A' and 3D Dynamos. They compete in this league because the area these clubs are based in is historically part of West Yorkshire.

List of mills in Saddleworth

This list of mills in Saddleworth, lists textile factories that have existed in Saddleworth, Greater Manchester, England.

Saddleworth is a civil parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham in Greater Manchester, England. It comprises several villages and hamlets amongst the west side of the Pennine hills: Uppermill, Greenfield, Dobcross, Delph, Diggle and others. Saddleworth lies to the east of the large town of Oldham.

Historically a part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, for centuries Saddleworth was a centre of woollen cloth production in the domestic system. For centuries Saddleworth was linked, ecclesiastically, with the parish of Rochdale though a civil parish in the West Riding of Yorkshire, so was long talked of as the part of Yorkshire where Lancastrians lived. Even then it had an Oldham postal address. Following the Industrial Revolution, Saddleworth became a centre for cotton spinning and weaving.

The former Saddleworth Urban District was the only part of the West Riding to have been amalgamated into Greater Manchester in 1974.

Micklehurst Line

The Micklehurst Line was a railway line between Stalybridge, Cheshire, and Diggle junction in the West Riding of Yorkshire (now part of Greater Manchester). The line, approximately eight miles long, was also sometimes referred to as the Micklehurst Loop and the Stalybridge and Diggle Loop Line.

Moorgate railway station (Greater Manchester)

Moorgate Halt railway station was opened on 1 January 1912 on the London and North Western Railway route from Stalybridge to Huddersfield. The station was only ever served by trains from Oldham to Delph via Greenfield. The station closed on 2 May 1955 when this service, known locally as the Delph Donkey, was withdrawn. The location of Moorgate Halt is now marked by a foot crossing over the railway at Uppermill, although no trace of the station remains. Nearby can be seen the foundations of Delph Junction signal box, where trains used to receive the token giving them authorisation to enter the single line section to Delph.

Rob Norbury

Rob Norbury is a British actor most popular for portraying Riley Costello in the Channel 4 soap opera Hollyoaksand Leon in Emmerdale.

Norbury grew up in Oldham. Norbury is involved in the restaurant business, opening a restaurant called Muse in Uppermill and taking over a pub called The Farrars Arms in Grasscroft.

Saddleworth

Saddleworth is a civil parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham in Greater Manchester, England. It comprises several villages and hamlets as well as suburbs of Oldham. amongst the west side of the Pennine hills: Austerlands, Delph, Denshaw, Diggle, Dobcross, Friezland, Grasscroft, Greenfield, Grotton, Lydgate, Scouthead, Springhead, Uppermill.Saddleworth lies east of Oldham and 11 miles (17.7 km) northeast of Manchester. It is broadly rural and had a population of 25,460 at the 2011 Census, making it one of the larger civil parishes in the United Kingdom.

Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, for centuries Saddleworth was a centre of woollen cloth production in the domestic system. Following the Industrial Revolution, in the 18th and 19th centuries, Saddleworth became a centre for cotton spinning and weaving. By the end of Queen Victoria's reign, mechanised textile production had become a vital part of the local economy. The Royal George Mill, owned by the Whitehead family, manufactured felt used for pianofortes, billiard tables and flags.

Following the Great Depression Saddleworth's textile sector declined. Much of Saddleworth's architecture and infrastructure dates from its textile processing days however, notably the Saddleworth Viaduct and several cottages and terraces, many built by the local mill owners.

For centuries Saddleworth was linked, ecclesiastically, with the parish of Rochdale and was long talked of as the part of Yorkshire where Lancastrians lived. The former Saddleworth Urban District was the only part of the West Riding to have been amalgamated into Greater Manchester in 1974. However, strong cultural links with Yorkshire remain amongst its communities. There are several brass bands in the parish.

Saddleworth Museum

Saddleworth Museum is an independent museum in Uppermill village, Saddleworth, Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, Greater Manchester, England. It is a registered charity and was accredited by the MLA.

The museum opened in 1962 and is housed in the outbuildings of the Victoria Mill, a 19th-century mill building which stood beside the Huddersfield Narrow Canal. Its collections show the history of Saddleworth, which until 1974 local government reorganisation was part of the West Riding of Yorkshire.

In September 2015 the museum closed for repair and remedial work to be undertaken and there was a temporary cabin in place while work on the building continued. the museum re-opened a year later in September 2016 after a £1.25 million refurbishment.

Saddleworth School

Saddleworth School is an 11–16 mixed community secondary school in Uppermill, Oldham, Greater Manchester, England. It is a specialist language college.

Saddleworth railway station

Saddleworth railway station, on the Huddersfield Line to the north of Uppermill, opened in August 1849 and closed to passengers in October 1968 as a consequence of a report by Richard Beeching on the restructuring of railway networks. The former station building can still be seen, having been sold after closure and converted into a private residence. It was the home of television director Ken Stephinson between 1978 and 2012.

Staley and Millbrook railway station

Staley and Millbrook railway station served the villages Staley and Millbrook in Stalybridge, Cheshire (later Tameside).

The station was built by the London and North Western Railway on the Micklehurst Line and opened on 3 May 1886. It served passengers until closure on 1 November 1909. The line through the station remained open for passenger traffic until 7 September 1964 and for freight until 1972.

Uppermill railway station

Uppermill Railway Station served the village of Uppermill in Oldham. It was built by the London and North Western Railway on their Micklehurst Line from Stalybridge to Diggle and Huddersfield. It opened in 1886 and closed to passengers in 1917. Regular passenger trains continued to pass through the station until 1964 and the line was closed completely in 1966.

Neighbouring towns, villages and places.
Settlements within the parish of Saddleworth

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