Upper Saddle River, New Jersey

Upper Saddle River is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 8,208.[9][10][11]

Upper Saddle River, New Jersey
Borough of Upper Saddle River
Map highlighting Upper Saddle River's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Upper Saddle River's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Upper Saddle River, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Upper Saddle River, New Jersey
Upper Saddle River is located in Bergen County, New Jersey
Upper Saddle River
Upper Saddle River
Location in Bergen County
Upper Saddle River is located in New Jersey
Upper Saddle River
Upper Saddle River
Location in New Jersey
Upper Saddle River is located in the United States
Upper Saddle River
Upper Saddle River
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 41°03′47″N 74°06′00″W / 41.063157°N 74.099976°WCoordinates: 41°03′47″N 74°06′00″W / 41.063157°N 74.099976°W[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyBergen
IncorporatedNovember 22, 1894
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorJoanne L. Minichetti (R, term ends December 31, 2019)[3][4]
 • AdministratorTheodore Preusch[5]
 • Municipal clerkRose Vido[6]
Area
 • Total5.281 sq mi (13.680 km2)
 • Land5.261 sq mi (13.627 km2)
 • Water0.020 sq mi (0.053 km2)  0.39%
Area rank269th of 566 in state
10th of 70 in county[1]
Elevation259 ft (79 m)
Population
 • Total8,208
 • Estimate 
(2018)[12]
8,270
 • Rank280th of 566 in state
46th of 70 in county[13]
 • Density1,560.0/sq mi (602.3/km2)
 • Density rank328th of 566 in state
62nd of 70 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−5:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
07458[14]
Area code(s)201[15]
FIPS code3400375140[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0885425[1][18]
Websitewww.usrtoday.org

History

Upper Saddle River was settled in the 18th century principally by Dutch settlers who built mills along the Saddle River. The area was granted borough status in 1894 and remained principally rural until the 1950s. The suburban growth of New Jersey affected Upper Saddle River and surrounding municipalities, as the borough's population increased tenfold from 1950 to 1970. The population has remained fairly constant since 1970.

Hopper Goetschius House Marker
Hopper-Goetschius House Historic Marker in Upper Saddle River

Predominantly a residential community consisting of one-acre (4,000 m2) lots, Upper Saddle River also contains a library, police station, fire station, ambulance corps, municipal hall, and three primary schools. Commerce and industry are concentrated along the town's western border along Route 17. Postal service is shared with the neighboring borough of Saddle River.[14]

Upper Saddle River was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on November 22, 1894, from portions of Hohokus Township and Orvil Township, based on the results of a referendum held two days earlier.[19] The borough was formed during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone. Upper Saddle River's referendum passed on November 20, one day after the referendum passed for Saddle River.[20] The name of the river, and hence the borough, is thought to come from early explorers who thought that the geography of the area resembled that of the Sadle Burn, the valley surrounding a stream in the Scottish area of Argyll.[21][22][23]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 5.281 square miles (13.680 km2), including 5.261 square miles (13.627 km2) of land and 0.020 square miles (0.053 km2) of water (0.39%).[1][2] The borough is bisected by the Saddle River, a tributary of the Passaic River.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Duffys Mills, Hoppers Mills and Posts Mills.[24]

Upper Saddle River is bounded by seven municipalities: Montvale, Saddle River, Ramsey, and Mahwah, as well as small portions of Woodcliff Lake in Bergen County, New Jersey, and Chestnut Ridge and Airmont in the Town of Ramapo in Rockland County, New York.[25]

The borough is served by several major highways, including the Garden State Parkway at exits 172 and 171 in Montvale and Woodcliff Lake, and Route 17, which runs through the borough, though some portions of Upper Saddle River are served by roads located in Saddle River, Ramsey and Mahwah.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900326
1910273−16.3%
1920251−8.1%
193034738.2%
194051047.0%
195070638.4%
19603,570405.7%
19707,949122.7%
19807,9580.1%
19907,198−9.6%
20007,7417.5%
20108,2086.0%
Est. 20188,270[12][26][27]0.8%
Population sources:
1900-1920[28] 1910[29]
1910-1930[30] 1900-2010[31][32][33]
2000[34][35] 2010[9][10][11]

Along with the neighboring borough of Saddle River (ranked number 2), Upper Saddle River (at number 22) has traditionally ranked at and near the highest per-capita income in New Jersey. Recent development of low-income housing and associated population expansion has shifted the borough's standing slightly.

2010 Census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,208 people, 2,639 households, and 2,298.569 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,560.0 per square mile (602.3/km2). There were 2,776 housing units at an average density of 527.6 per square mile (203.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 86.55% (7,104) White, 1.44% (118) Black or African American, 0.13% (11) Native American, 10.09% (828) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.48% (39) from other races, and 1.30% (107) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.33% (355) of the population.[9]

There were 2,639 households out of which 48.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 78.3% were married couples living together, 6.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 12.9% were non-families. 10.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.11 and the average family size was 3.37.[9]

In the borough, the population was spread out with 30.6% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 18.0% from 25 to 44, 32.9% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.9 years. For every 100 females there were 96.1 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 93.8 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $175,399 (with a margin of error of +/- $22,259) and the median family income was $179,241 (+/- $47,207). Males had a median income of $160,795 (+/- $24,471) versus $67,885 (+/- $27,436) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $73,639 (+/- $8,085). About 1.5% of families and 1.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 1.5% of those age 65 or over.[36]

Same-sex couples headed 13 households in 2010, an increase from the 12 counted in 2000.[37]

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 7,741 people, 2,497 households, and 2,242 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,462.7 people per square mile (565.0/km2). There were 2,560 housing units at an average density of 483.7 per square mile (186.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.24% White, 0.93% African American, 0.03% Native American, 6.28% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.52% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.18% of the population.[34][35]

There were 2,497 households out of which 47.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 83.6% were married couples living together, 4.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 10.2% were non-families. 8.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.09 and the average family size was 3.27.[34][35]

In the borough the population was spread out with 30.7% under the age of 18, 3.8% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 29.0% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.0 males.[34][35]

The median income for a household in the borough was $127,635, and the median income for a family was $132,401. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $51,587 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $57,239. None of the families and 0.7% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 2.1% of those over 64.[34][35]

Economy

Pearson Education (formerly Prentice Hall), a scholastic division of Pearson was headquartered in Upper Saddle River until late 2015.[38]

Onkyo USA is headquartered in Upper Saddle River.[39]

The North American headquarters of Hunter Douglas are located in the borough.[40]

Government

Local government

Upper Saddle River is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Upper Saddle River, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[41][42]

As of 2019, the Mayor of Upper Saddle River is Republican Joanne L. Minichetti, whose term of office ends December 31, 2019. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Vincent M. Durante (R, 2021), Roger B. DeBerardine (R, 2020), Steven F. DiMartino (R, 2020), Jonathan W. Ditkoff (R, 2019), Joanne Florio (R, 2021) and Douglas Rotella (R, 2019; appointed to serve an unexpired term).[3][43][44][45][46][47][48]

In March 2019, the Borough Council selected Douglas Rotella from a list of three candidates nominated by the Republican municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2019 that was held by Thomas H. Hafner until he resigned from office the previous month.[49]

Federal, state and county representation

Upper Saddle River is located in the 5th Congressional District[50] and is part of New Jersey's 39th state legislative district.[10][51][52]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Josh Gottheimer (D, Wyckoff).[53][54]

New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[55] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[56][57]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 39th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Gerald Cardinale (R, Demarest) and in the General Assembly by Holly Schepisi (R, River Vale) and Robert Auth (R, Old Tappan).[58][59]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders. The freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year; a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore are selected from among its seven members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[60][61] As of 2018, the County Executive is Democratic James J. Tedesco III of Paramus, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018.[62] Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman Thomas J. Sullivan Jr., (D, Montvale, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder chairman ends 2018),[63] Freeholder Vice-Chairwoman Germaine M. Ortiz (D, Emerson, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder vice-chairwoman ends 2018),[64] Freeholder Chairman Pro-Tempore Mary J. Amoroso (D, Mahwah, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder chairman pro-tempore ends 2018),[65] David L. Ganz (D, Fair Lawn, 2020),[66] Steve Tanelli (D, North Arlington, 2018),[67] Joan Voss (D, Fort Lee, 2020)[68] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, Franklin Lakes, 2018),[69][70][71][60] Bergen County's constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale, 2021),[72][73] Sheriff Michael Saudino (D, Emerson, 2019)[74][75] and Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill, 2021).[76][77][60][78]

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,587 registered voters in Upper Saddle River, of which 996 (17.8% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,840 (32.9% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 2,746 (49.1% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[79] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 68.1% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 98.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[79][80]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 2,726 votes (65.3% vs. 43.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,405 votes (33.7% vs. 54.8%) and other candidates with 22 votes (0.5% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,174 ballots cast by the borough's 5,987 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.7% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[81][82] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,565 votes (58.1% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,788 votes (40.5% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 29 votes (0.7% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,415 ballots cast by the borough's 5,648 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.2% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[83][84] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,671 votes (61.5% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,635 votes (37.6% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 24 votes (0.6% vs. 0.7%), among the 4,345 ballots cast by the borough's 5,319 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.7% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[85]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 78.0% of the vote (1,817 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 21.2% (493 votes), and other candidates with 0.8% (19 votes), among the 2,369 ballots cast by the borough's 5,699 registered voters (40 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 41.6%.[86][87] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,830 votes (63.8% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 899 votes (31.3% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 115 votes (4.0% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 9 votes (0.3% vs. 0.5%), among the 2,869 ballots cast by the borough's 5,620 registered voters, yielding a 51.0% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[88]

Education

Public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Upper Saddle River School District. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its three schools had an enrollment of 1,256 students and 108.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.6:1.[89] The schools in the district (with 2014-15 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[90]) are Robert D. Reynolds Primary School[91] (grades PreK-2; 342 students), Edith A. Bogert Elementary School[92] (3-5; 428) and Emil A. Cavallini Middle School[93] (6-8; 478).[94][95]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend the Northern Highlands Regional High School in nearby Allendale, which serves students from Allendale, Ho-Ho-Kus, Upper Saddle River, and some students from Saddle River.[96] As of the 2013-14 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,349 students and 117.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.5:1.[97] As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,373 students and 115.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.9:1.[98]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[99][100]

Rodie Child Care Center, run by the YWCA of Bergen County, is open to children from 6 weeks old to 6 years old, including an all-day private Kindergarten class, and is located on Pleasant Avenue.[101]

Parks and recreation

  • Hess Park - located on Hess Court, the park has athletic fields and a playground
  • Lions Memorial Park - located on Lake Street, this park has athletic playing fields, walking paths, and a playground. This park was built and funded by the Saddle River Valley Lions Club. The park is also home to the annual Saddle River Valley Lions Club carnival; held every year on Memorial Day weekend.
  • Liberty Pond Park - located on Hopper Farm Road, this park has a gazebo and swing benches, as guests view the West Branch Saddle River pond.

Transportation

2018-07-19 08 19 34 View south along New Jersey State Route 17 just north of the exit for Upper Saddle River in Upper Saddle River, Bergen County, New Jersey
View south along Route 17 in Upper Saddle River

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 60.00 miles (96.56 km) of roadways, of which 51.56 miles (82.98 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.83 miles (12.60 km) by Bergen County and 0.61 miles (0.98 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[102]

Route 17, West Saddle River Road, East Saddle River Road, and Lake Street are the main roads in Upper Saddle River.

Public transportation

Short Line offers limited service from stops on Lake Street and Saddle River Road between the borough and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.[103]

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Upper Saddle River include:

References

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  3. ^ a b Borough Hall Information, Upper Saddle River Borough. Accessed October 9, 2019.
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  5. ^ Administrator, Borough of Upper Saddle River. Accessed October 9, 2019.
  6. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Upper Saddle River. Accessed October 9, 2019.
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  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Upper Saddle River, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
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  78. ^ Constitutional Officers, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed February 24, 2018.
  79. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Bergen, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 20, 2013.
  80. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2013.
  81. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 20, 2013.
  82. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 20, 2013.
  83. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 20, 2013.
  84. ^ 2008 General Election Results for Upper Saddle River, The Record (Bergen County). Accessed December 20, 2013.
  85. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 20, 2013.
  86. ^ "Governor - Bergen County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  87. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Bergen County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  88. ^ 2009 Governor: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 20, 2013.
  89. ^ District information for Upper Saddle River School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016.
  90. ^ School Data for the Upper Saddle River Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016.
  91. ^ Robert D. Reynolds Primary School, Upper Saddle River Schools. Accessed January 8, 2017.
  92. ^ Edith A. Bogert Elementary School, Upper Saddle River Schools. Accessed January 8, 2017.
  93. ^ Emil A. Cavallini Middle School, Upper Saddle River Schools. Accessed January 8, 2017.
  94. ^ District Profile, Upper Saddle River Schools. Accessed January 8, 2017. "The school system consists of three facilities: Reynolds Elementary (Pre-K to 2), Bogert Elementary (3 to 5) and Cavallini Middle School (6-8)."
  95. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Upper Saddle River School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  96. ^ Northern Highlands Regional High School 2015 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed May 31, 2016. "A four-year public high school, Northern Highlands strives to address the needs of all of its students who come from four towns in northern Bergen County: Allendale, Upper Saddle River, Ho-Ho-Kus, and Saddle River."
  97. ^ School Data for Northern Highlands Regional High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed May 31, 2016.
  98. ^ School data for Northern Highlands Regional High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 12, 2016.
  99. ^ About Us, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 20, 2013.
  100. ^ Admissions, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  101. ^ ywFull Day Child Care. YWCA of Bergen County. Accessed December 19, 2013.
  102. ^ Bergen County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 19, 2013.
  103. ^ Schedule Details Upper Saddle River, NJ to New York, NY, Short Line (bus company). Accessed December 19, 2013.
  104. ^ Kitchin, Jessica. "The Phenom; At 16, Kristie Ahn is poised to be a tennis power.", New Jersey Monthly, March 18, 2009. Accessed December 19, 2013. "As the top-ranked junior tennis player in the country, Kristie Ahn has won countless matches, including those that secured her USTA National Spring Championship and Junior Fed Cup last year. But it was actually in one of her rare defeats that this 16-year-old from Upper Saddle River found the most joy."
  105. ^ Davis, Noah. "So What Do You Do, Jim Bankoff, CEO of Vox Media?The former AOL exec discusses his plans to bring quality back to the Web", Media Bistro, July 24, 2013. Accessed October 17, 2015. "Hometown: Upper Saddle River, NJ and New York, NY"
  106. ^ Miles, Gary. "What They're Seeking Is Field Hockey Gold", The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 5, 1998. Accessed August 21, 2011. "Team captain Beth Beglin of Upper Saddle River, N.J., recently named the head coach at the University of Iowa, and Californians Marcy Place von Schottenstein and Sheryl Johnson are back from the 1984 team. Johnson also serves as the team's vice captain."
  107. ^ via Associated Press. "Harold Dow, 48 Hours Correspondent, Dies at 62", The New York Times, August 21, 2010. Accessed February 8, 2012. "Mr. Dow died suddenly Saturday morning in New Jersey, a network spokeswoman, Louise Bashi, said. He lived in Upper Saddle River, N.J., but it wasn't immediately clear if he had been at home. The cause of death was not announced."
  108. ^ "Wes Ellis Jr., 52, Golf ProfessionaL", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 6, 1984. Accessed August 2, 2007. "Wes Ellis Jr., 52, a professional golfer who dropped out of competition to be with his family, died Monday at Holy Name Hospital in Teaneck, N.J. He lived in Upper Saddle River, N.J."
  109. ^ McManus, Jane. "For Athletes in Motion, Real Estate Can Be a Burden", The New York Times, November 26, 2009. Accessed February 8, 2012. "Jets kicker Jay Feely bought his Upper Saddle River, N.J., home as a Giant in 2005 then returned last season as a Jet."
  110. ^ Staff. "Florida State Men Earn Seventh Consecutive ACC Indoor Title: Florida State men's track and field team took first place at the 2009 Atlantic Coast Conference Indoor Championship for the seventh-consecutive year and eighth title overall.", WCTV, March 2, 2009. Accessed February 22, 2011. "The men's 60m dash also included several Seminoles earning awards as Michael Ray Garvin (Upper Saddle River, N.J.) took the silver medal home with his second place finish and NCAA automatic mark of 6.59."
  111. ^ Thurber, Jon. "George Gallagher, 72; Cartoonist Created Feisty Cat Heathcliff", Los Angeles Times, October 4, 2001. Accessed November 17, 2017. "Gallagher died Sunday of cardiopulmonary disease at Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, N.J. A resident of Upper Saddle River, N.J., Gallagher had been hospitalized in declining health for several months."
  112. ^ DeVencentis, Philip. "CBS anchor Kristine Johnson, of Bergen County, to give William Paterson graduation address", The Record (Bergen County), May 16, 2018. Accessed May 17, 2018. "Relaying the message will be commencement speaker Kristine Johnson, co-anchor of evening news for WCBS-TV in New York City. Clearly no stranger to broadcasting, the Emmy Award-winning anchor, who lives with her family in Upper Saddle River, is no stranger to success, either."
  113. ^ "New Voice - Opera announcer with a New Jersey accent", The Record (Bergen County), October 5, 2004. Accessed August 2, 2007. "In the world of opera, Margaret Juntwait, born and raised in Ridgewood and Upper Saddle River, has certainly achieved an enviable position. The Metropolitan Opera announced that the WNYC-FM classical music host with the seductively smooth voice will announce Saturday afternoon radio broadcasts from the Metropolitan Opera."
  114. ^ Wakin, Daniel J. "Met Picks New Voice For Opera Broadcasts", The New York Times, September 29, 2004. Accessed August 2, 2007. "Ms. Juntwait, 47, was brought up in Ridgewood and Upper Saddle River, N.J., and went to work at WNYC in 1991. She lives in the Inwood section of Manhattan."
  115. ^ Adamek, Steve. "Kidd's secret recipe ", The Record (Bergen County), November 15, 2002. Accessed December 14, 2008. "Yet, Tuesday night at Jason and Joumana Kidd's Upper Saddle River home wasn't about eating, although Jefferson acknowledged that if not for the meal, he might have dined on 'potato chips' or fast food, or simply slept through dinner."
  116. ^ Levin, Jay. "Farewell to the father of Dove soap: Researcher Vincent Lamberti, 86, of Upper Saddle River, dies", The Record (Bergen County), April 4, 2014. Accessed October 17, 2015. "Vincent Lamberti, whose toil in the lab resulted in the development of Dove — the bar soap that really isn't soap at all — has died. He was 86 and lived in Upper Saddle River."
  117. ^ Staff. "Woodcliff Lake officials appoint ex Hackensack chief of police as new borough administrator", Pascack Valley Community Life, August 20, 2015. "Woodcliff Lake officials unanimously appointed Tomas Padilla as the borough administrator at their Aug. 10 meeting. Padilla, an Upper Saddle River resident, started his position with the borough on Monday, Aug. 17."
  118. ^ Anderson, Dave. "The Grime and the Emptiness of N.F.L. Labor Disputes", The New York Times, March 19, 2011. Accessed March 20, 2014. "When the Giants returned from a Monday night road game, Parcells and his coaches usually went directly to Giants Stadium, slept for a few hours, if at all, then began preparing the game plan for Sunday's opponent. Instead, Parcells drove to his Upper Saddle River, N.J., home and didn't arrive at the stadium until Tuesday afternoon."
  119. ^ Feldberg, Robert. "Jason Patric stars in his father's hit play, 'That Championship Season'", The Record (Bergen County), February 13, 2011. Accessed February 22, 2011. "The money from That Championship Season enabled the family, which included Patric's brother and sister, to move to Upper Saddle River and a five-bedroom house on a large piece of land.... Patric (his given name is Jason Patric Miller Jr.) attended Cavallini Middle School, and then Don Bosco Preparatory High School in Ramsey."
  120. ^ Slobodzian, Joseph A. "Kean will nominate key aide Gary Stein to state Supreme Court", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 11, 1984. Accessed November 17, 2017. "In announcing his intention to appoint Stein, 51, of Upper Saddle River, Bergen County, Kean praised Stein's work as his director of policy and planning and said 'Stein possesses a depth of knowledge and experience which will be an asset to the Supreme Court.'"
  121. ^ Anderson, Dave. "Sports of The Times; Lawrence Taylor, the Phantom of L. T., and the Hall of Fame in Canton", The New York Times, November 1, 1998. Accessed February 8, 2012. "Hoping to avert foreclosure on his home in Upper Saddle River, N.J., where he is reportedly $350,000 in arrears in mortgage payments and other fees, Lawrence Taylor, not L. T., declared Chapter 7 bankruptcy Thursday, four days after he entered an unidentified drug rehabilitation clinic in New Jersey."
  122. ^ McCarron, Anthony. "Yanks Reel in Villone. Trade with Fish Brins Lefty Home", New York Daily News, December 17, 2005. Accessed December 19, 2013. "Ron Villone grew up a Yankee fan and still lives within 20 miles of the Stadium, in Upper Saddle River, N.J. So when he found out yesterday that the Marlins had traded him to the Yankees, the lefty's thoughts drifted back to the late 1970s, when he sat in the stands and marveled at Ron Guidry."
  123. ^ Anderson, Dave. "Sports of The Times; What Parcells Didn't Say", The New York Times, January 22, 1993. Accessed October 17, 2015. "Young, when asked three weeks ago if his relationship with Parcells was still good, replied, 'I like to think so.' They live only about a mile apart in Upper Saddle River, N.J., but Young never even phoned his former coach."
  124. ^ Letter from David A. Stern; August 5, 2007, Roy White Foundation. Accessed October 17, 2015.
  125. ^ Staff. "2012 Quidditch comes to life in England", The Record (Bergen County) copied at MathhewZiff.com. Accessed September 8, 2017. "Other North Jersey players on the winning team were William Greco of Montvale and Matthew Ziff from Upper Saddle River."

Sources

External links

Beth Beglin

Elizabeth Anne "Beth" Beglin (born April 2, 1957 in Teaneck, New Jersey) is a former field hockey player from the United States, who was a member of the Women's National Team that won the bronze medal at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, California.

Edward H. Hynes

Edward H. Hynes (born May 9, 1946) is an American Democratic Party politician who served two terms in the New Jersey General Assembly.

Gary Saul Stein

Gary Saul Stein (born June 13, 1933) is an American attorney and former Associate Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court, He served on New Jersey's Supreme Court for 17 years where he wrote over 365 published opinions. From 1982 until 1985, he served as the Director of the New Jersey Governor’s Office of Policy and Planning. He also served as the Paramus Borough Attorney and serves on the boards of Trustees of The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, New Jersey and Drew University in Madison, New Jersey.

George Gately

George Gately Gallagher (December 21, 1928 – September 30, 2001), better known as George Gately, was an American cartoonist, notable as the creator of the Heathcliff comic strip.

Born in Queens Village, Queens, Gately came from a family of comics lovers. His father was an amateur doodler, and his elder brother John was also a cartoonist. He grew up and went to school in Bergenfield, New Jersey.Gately studied art at Pratt Institute. After graduating, he worked at an advertising agency for 11 years, but commercial art gave him little satisfaction. Seeing the success of his elder brother, George decided to enter the cartoon field. In 1957, he sold his first comic. He dropped his last name of Gallagher to avoid confusion with his brother.

George Young (American football executive)

George Bernard Young (September 22, 1930 – December 8, 2001) was an American football player, coach, and executive. He served as the general manager of the New York Giants from 1979 to 1997. He was named NFL Executive of the Year five times.

Harold Dow

Harold Dow (September 28, 1947 – August 21, 2010) was an American television news correspondent, journalist, and investigative reporter with CBS News.

Hopper House

Hopper House may refer to:

in the United States(by state, then city)

Hopper Court, Hopkinsville, Kentucky, listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in Christian County, Kentucky

Ackerman-Hopper House, Glen Rock, New Jersey, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Bergen County, New Jersey

Andrew H. Hopper House, Glen Rock, New Jersey, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Bergen County, New Jersey

Garret Hopper House, Glen Rock, New Jersey, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Bergen County, New Jersey

Hendrick Hopper House, Glen Rock, New Jersey, NRHP-listed

John Hopper House, Hackensack, New Jersey, NRHP-listed

Terhune-Hopper House (Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey), listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Bergen County, New Jersey

Hopper-Van Horn House, Mahwah, New Jersey, NRHP-listed

Demarest-Hopper House, Oakland, New Jersey, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Bergen County, New Jersey

Hopper House (Saddle River, New Jersey), NRHP-listed

Hopper House (Upper Saddle River, New Jersey), NRHP-listed

Hopper-Goetschius House, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, NRHP-listed

Terhune-Hopper House (Upper Saddle River, New Jersey), listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Bergen County, New Jersey

Van Riper-Hopper House, Wayne, New Jersey, NRHP-listed

Isaac T. Hopper House, New York, New York, NRHP-listed

Edward Hopper Birthplace and Boyhood Home, Nyack, New York, NRHP-listed

Hopper-Snyder Homestead, Watsontown, Pennsylvania, NRHP-listed

Hopper House (Upper Saddle River, New Jersey)

Hopper House is located in Upper Saddle River, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. The house was built in 1750 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on January 10, 1983.

Jason Patric

Jason Patric (born June 17, 1966) is an American film, television and stage actor. He is known for his roles in films such as The Lost Boys, Rush, Sleepers, Geronimo: An American Legend, Your Friends & Neighbors, Narc, The Losers, The Alamo, and Speed 2: Cruise Control. His father was actor/playwright Jason Miller and his maternal grandfather was actor Jackie Gleason.

Jim Bankoff

James Philip Bankoff is an American businessman who serves as chairman and chief executive officer (CEO) of Vox Media. Prior to joining SB Nation, which was rebranded from SB Nation in 2011, he worked for AOL.

Kevin J. Rooney

Kevin J. Rooney (born January 13, 1960) is an American Republican Party politician representing the 40th Legislative District in the New Jersey General Assembly.

Kristie Ahn

Kristie Hyerim Ahn (born June 15, 1992) is an American professional tennis player.

She has won seven singles titles and two doubles titles on the ITF Women's Circuit. On 9 September 2019, she reached her best singles ranking of world No. 93. Her first appearance at a Grand Slam tournament was at the age of 16 at the 2008 U.S. Open. In 2019, she was given a wild card bid and reached the fourth round of the U.S. Open where she became the first Asian American to make the round of 16 at a Grand Slam tournament since Lilia Osterloh accomplished the feat in 2000.

Ahn is of Korean descent and was born in Flushing Hospital lived in Englewood Cliffs, N.J. She graduated from Stanford University in 2014 with a degree in Science, Technology and Society.

Kristine Johnson

Kristine Johnson (born June 5, 1972, in Angeles City, Pampanga, Philippines), is a co-anchor at WCBS-TV in New York City on the 5 p.m. and 11 p.m. newscasts with Maurice DuBois.

Margaret Juntwait

Margaret Ann Juntwait (March 18, 1957 – June 3, 2015) was an American radio broadcaster, and the voice of the Metropolitan Opera radio broadcasts. After 13 years on the air at WNYC-Radio, she debuted as the Met's radio announcer on December 11, 2004. She was also the Met's first announcer on Sirius XM Satellite Radio from 2006 and remained in both jobs until her death in 2015.

New North Reformed Low Dutch Church

New North Reformed Low Dutch Church (also known as Saddle River Reformed Church and The Old Stone Church) is a historic Reformed church on East Saddle River Road at Old Stone Church Road in Upper Saddle River, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. The church was built in 1789 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 15, 1982.

Saddle River (Passaic River tributary)

For the municipalities named for the river, see Saddle River, New Jersey and Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.

The Saddle River flows south through much of Bergen County, New Jersey. The river runs through densely populated suburban areas for much of its course. The river takes its name from the river near Saddell in Argyll and Bute in Scotland.The headwaters of the Saddle River are in the piedmont terrain of Rockland County, in southern New York state. Streams from this area flow south, forming the Saddle River at their confluence, two miles south of the New York state border, in the town of Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.

From its feeder streams in Upper Saddle River and the source in Airmont, New York, the Saddle River continues south for 16.3 miles, passing through the towns of Saddle River, Waldwick, Ho-Ho-Kus, Ridgewood, Glen Rock, Paramus, Fair Lawn, Rochelle Park, Saddle Brook, Lodi, Garfield, and Wallington.

The Ho-Ho-Kus Brook, a major tributary, joins the Saddle River at the Dunkerhook area of Saddle River County Park. Their confluence marks the border of four Bergen County towns: Ridgewood, Paramus, Glen Rock and Fair Lawn.

The terminus of the Saddle River is at Garfield and Wallington, where the waterway empties into the Passaic River. The Passaic River drains at Newark Bay and via Arthur Kill and Kill van Kull to the Atlantic Ocean. he northern part of the Saddle River watershed drains an area between the Ramapo River watershed to the west, and the Hackensack River watershed to the east.

Fish species in the Saddle River include largemouth bass, pickerel, bullhead catfish, sunfish and different varieties of trout. Most of the trout are stocked by the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife, although the uppermost reaches of the river and some of its tributaries hold wild brown trout. These wild trout are threatened by increased residential use of lawn fertilizer which contributes to algae and weed growth.

Upper Saddle River School District

The Upper Saddle River School District is a community public school district that serves students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade in Upper Saddle River in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States.

As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its three schools had an enrollment of 1,256 students and 108.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.6:1.The district is classified by the New Jersey Department of Education as being in District Factor Group "J", the highest of eight groupings. District Factor Groups organize districts statewide to allow comparison by common socioeconomic characteristics of the local districts. From lowest socioeconomic status to highest, the categories are A, B, CD, DE, FG, GH, I and J.As of 2012, school elections were shifted from April to the November general election as part of an effort to reduce the costs of a standalone April vote.For high school, public school students in Allendale for grades nine through twelve attend Northern Highlands Regional High School, which also serves students from Ho-Ho-Kus, Upper Saddle River and some of Saddle River's students (who have the option of attending either Northern Highlands or Ramsey High School, as part of sending/receiving relationships with the two districts). As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,373 students and 115.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.9:1.

Vincent Lamberti

Vincent Lamberti (c. 1927/28 – March 21, 2014) was an American chemist and inventor, who held 118 granted patents, and is best known as the inventor of Dove soap.

Wes Ellis

Wesley Ellis, Jr. (January 27, 1932 – June 4, 1984) was an American professional golfer who played on the PGA Tour in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s.

Ellis was born in Kansas City, Missouri. He attended the University of Texas in Austin and was a member of the golf team from 1950–1952. He won the Massingill Trophy in 1950, and was the individual medalist at the Southwest Conference Championship in 1952. He graduated in 1953 with a degree in zoology and turned professional in 1954.Ellis won three PGA Tour events. His first win came at the 1958 Canadian Open. He won by one stroke over Jay Hebert at the Mayfair Golf and Country Club in Edmonton, Alberta. His last win came in 1965 at the San Diego Open Invitational in a playoff against golf legend Billy Casper. His victory in San Diego was unique in that Ellis used what is commonly known as a "cross-handed" putting grip; that is, as a right-handed golfer he kept his left hand below his right. Ellis had four top-10 finishes in major championships: a T-9 at the 1956 U.S. Open, a T-8 at the 1966 U.S. Open, a 6th at the 1960 PGA Championship and a T-5 at the 1961 PGA Championship.

Ellis, like many pro golfers of his generation, earned his living primarily as a club pro. For many years he was the head pro at the Westchester Country Club in Rye, New York and lived in Upper Saddle River, New Jersey. He died of kidney disease at the age of 52 at Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck, New Jersey. He left behind his wife, Marian, and their four children - three daughters and a son.

Municipalities and communities of Bergen County, New Jersey, United States
Cities
Boroughs
Townships
Villages
Unincorporated
communities

Languages

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