Upper Ammonoosuc River

The Upper Ammonoosuc River is a tributary of the Connecticut River that flows through Coös County in northern part of the northeastern U.S. state of New Hampshire. Despite its name, the river is not an upstream portion of the Ammonoosuc River, but instead a separate tributary of the Connecticut River flowing from 20 to 60 miles (32 to 97 km) to the north of the Ammonoosuc.

The Upper Ammonoosuc rises in Pond of Safety in the town of Randolph, runs first generally north through rural portions of Berlin (where it flows through the Godfrey Dam), Milan and a corner of Dummer, then west through Stark and then Northumberland where it drains into the Connecticut near the village of Groveton. The end points of that 42.4-mile (68.2 km) course are approximately 25 air miles (38 km) apart.[1]

From Milan to Groveton it is fairly closely paralleled by New Hampshire Route 110.

Fort Wentworth was built in 1755 at the junction of the Upper Ammonoosuc and the Connecticut Rivers (now near the village of Groveton). The fort was used sporadically during both the French and Indian War and the American Revolutionary War.

The watershed area includes the northern Crescent Range, eastern Pliny Range and the eastern and northern Pilot Range, all in the White Mountains. Major tributaries of the Upper Ammonoosuc include:

Nash Stream, rising in the township of Odell,
Phillips Brook, rising in Erving's Location,
the North Branch of the Upper Ammonoosuc, flowing roughly parallel to and east of the main stem (with a ridge between them, that includes Hodgdon Hill and carries NH Rte. 110) in the town of Milan, to join it at West Milan, and
the West Branch of the Upper Ammonoosuc rising on the eastern slope of Mount Cabot in Kilkenny, draining Unknown Pond and York Pond, and joining the main stem below the Godfrey Dam.
UpperAmmonoosuc
The Upper Ammonoosuc at the covered bridge in Stark, New Hampshire

See also

References

  1. ^ "New Hampshire GRANIT state geographic information system". Archived from the original on 2013-08-03. Retrieved 2012-03-30.

Coordinates: 44°35′20″N 71°32′09″W / 44.58889°N 71.53583°W

Christine Lake (New Hampshire)

Christine Lake is a 197-acre (0.8 km2) water body located in Coos County in northern New Hampshire, United States, in the town of Stark. The lake lies southeast of the Percy Peaks and north of the Upper Ammonoosuc River. Water from Christine Lake flows via the Upper Ammonoosuc to the Connecticut River at Groveton and thence south to Long Island Sound.

The lake is classified as a coldwater fishery, with observed species including brook trout, brown trout, and smallmouth bass.

Coos, New Hampshire

Coos, New Hampshire refers to the frontier area of northern New Hampshire. During the American Revolution a military command was located at Haverhill, New Hampshire to protect the New Hampshire Grants and to support military efforts in the invasion of Canada.

The name was later given to a portion of northern Grafton County in 1803 when a new county, named Coos, was created.

The location was originally a name associated with a part of the migratory Abenaki tribe. The location was known before 1704 to have military significance for several provincial governments and the leaders in New France.

In 1755, a Fort Wentworth was to be constructed by Rogers' Rangers at the junction of the Upper Ammonoosuc River with the Connecticut River in present-day Northumberland, New Hampshire. A river with a similar name, the Ammonoosuc River, flows through Grafton County, joining the Connecticut opposite Newbury, Vermont. The upper Coos refers to the area around Lancaster, New Hampshire, the county seat of Coos County, and the lower Coos to Newbury, Vermont. The distance between these locations is approximately 40 miles (64 km).

Dublin Pond

Dublin Pond or Dublin Lake is a 236-acre (0.96 km2) water body located in Cheshire County in southwestern New Hampshire, United States, in the town of Dublin. The pond lies at an elevation of 1,480 feet (451 m) above sea level, near the height of land between the Connecticut River/Long Island Sound watershed to the west and the Merrimack River/Gulf of Maine watershed to the east.

Fort Wentworth

Fort Wentworth was built by order of Benning Wentworth in 1755. The fort was built at the junction of the Upper Ammonoosuc River and Connecticut River, in Northumberland, New Hampshire, by soldiers of Colonel Joseph Blanchard's New Hampshire Provincial Regiment including Robert Rogers. In 1759, Rogers' Rangers returned here hoping for resupply after their raid on St. Francis, Quebec, but the fort had no garrison and no supplies. Rogers had to travel down the Connecticut River to Fort at Number 4 for reinforcements and supplies for his hungry men.

During the American Revolutionary War, Jeremiah Eames' Company of rangers garrisoned and repaired the unused fort from 1776–1778 in order to protect northern New Hampshire from attack from the British nearby in Canada. Other units of New Hampshire Militia also formed part of the garrison until the end of the war in 1783.

A stone monument stands near the village of Groveton on U.S. Route 3 near the site of the fort.

List of rivers of New Hampshire

This is a list of rivers and significant streams in the U.S. state of New Hampshire.

All watercourses named "River" (freshwater or tidal) are listed here, as well as other streams which are either subject to the New Hampshire Comprehensive Shoreland Protection Act or are more than 10 miles (16 km) long. New Hampshire rivers and streams qualify for state shoreland protection (and are listed here in bold) if they are fourth-order or larger water bodies, based on the Strahler method of stream order classification.

Mount Cabot

Mount Cabot is a mountain located in Coos County, in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. The mountain is the highest peak of the Pilot Range of the White Mountains. Cabot is flanked to the northeast by The Bulge, and to the south of Bunnell Notch by Terrace Mountain. Mount Cabot was named in honor of the Italian explorer Sebastian Cabot.Cabot is drained by various brooks on the west side into the Israel River and on the east into the West Branch of the Upper Ammonoosuc River, and thence into the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound.

Cabot is one of the Appalachian Mountain Club's "four-thousand footers", the northernmost in New Hampshire. It is also on the New England Fifty Finest list of the most topographically prominent peaks. The valley of the Israel River separates the Pilot Range from the rest of the White Mountains; Mt. Cabot's relative isolation gives it the fifth-highest topographic prominence in New Hampshire, and the fourteenth-highest in New England.

Mount Crescent

Mount Crescent is a mountain located in the Crescent Range of the White Mountains in Randolph, New Hampshire. It is 3,251 ft (991 m) high, and its summit is the second highest mountain summit in Randolph, after Black Crescent Mountain (3,264 feet, 995 m). Both mountains are in Randolph's Ice Gulch Town Forest. On the 1896 topographic map, Mount Crescent is shown as "Randolph Mtn." with an elevation of 3,280 ft, and Black Crescent is shown as "Mt. Crescent" with an elevation of 3,322 ft.

The southeast side of Mount Crescent drains into Moose Brook, thence into the Androscoggin River, which drains into Merrymeeting Bay, the estuary of the Kennebec River, and thence into the Gulf of Maine.

The southwest end of Mt. Crescent drains into Carlton Brook, thence into the Moose River, a different stream which is also a tributary of the Androscoggin River.

The northwest side of Crescent drains into the Upper Ammonoosuc River, thence into Connecticut River, which drains into Long Island Sound in Connecticut.

Mount Crescent may be reached by hiking trails from either the north, via Pond of Safety Road (sometimes shown as Stag Hollow Road) and Bog Dam Road, or from the south, via Randolph Hill Road.

Mount Kelsey

Mount Kelsey is a mountain located in the western portion of Millsfield, New Hampshire. The western slopes of the mountain are contained within the township of Erving's Location, New Hampshire. The summit is occupied by part of the Granite Reliable Wind Farm, with road access from the Phillips Brook watershed to the south.

The north side of Mount Kelsey drains into the West Branch of Clear Stream, a tributary of the Androscoggin River, which flows south and east into Maine, joining the Kennebec River near the Atlantic Ocean. The southeast side of Kelsey drains into North Inlet Stream, thence into Millsfield Pond Brook, and into Clear Stream. The west side of Kelsey drains into Phillips Brook, thence into the Upper Ammonoosuc River, the upper Connecticut River, and into Long Island Sound in Connecticut.

Nash Stream

Nash Stream is a 15.3-mile-long (24.6 km) river in northern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Upper Ammonoosuc River and part of the Connecticut River watershed.

Nash Stream rises on the western slopes of Whitcomb Mountain in the township of Odell, New Hampshire, and flows south-southwest through the town of Stratford to join the Upper Ammonoosuc River in the town of Stark. Near its headwaters, it passes through Nash Bog Pond, an extensive marshy area which used to be a large pond closed by a dam. The dam washed out in the 1960s. Nearly the entire stream is within the boundaries of the Nash Stream Forest, owned by the state of New Hampshire.

The Nash Stream watershed is surrounded by mountains. The most commonly hiked are North and South Percy Peaks, barren summits offering extensive views reached by a trail, and Sugarloaf, reached by a trail which formerly gave access to a fire tower.

Nash Stream Forest

Nash Stream Forest is a nearly 40,000-acre (160 km2) protected area in northern New Hampshire in the United States. The state-owned property is located south of Dixville Notch in the towns of Stark, Stratford, and Columbia, and in Odell township. The forest occupies land on either side of Nash Stream, a south-flowing tributary of the Upper Ammonoosuc River and part of the Connecticut River watershed. The forest is bordered to the south by Christine Lake and Kauffmann Forest.

North Branch Upper Ammonoosuc River

The North Branch of the Upper Ammonoosuc River is an 11.0-mile (17.7 km) long river in northern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Upper Ammonoosuc River and part of the Connecticut River watershed.

Nearly the entire length of the North Branch is in the town of Milan, New Hampshire. The river briefly enters the city of Berlin, where it passes through Head Pond, then heads north back into Milan, running parallel to the Upper Ammonoosuc until the two rivers join in the village of West Milan. The Androscoggin River, just three miles to the east, flows parallel to the two Upper Ammonoosuc branches, but in the opposite direction. The St. Lawrence and Atlantic Railroad follows the North Branch from Head Pond to West Milan.

Paris, New Hampshire

Paris is an unincorporated community located within the towns of Dummer and Stark, New Hampshire, United States. The community is located along New Hampshire Route 110 and north of the Upper Ammonoosuc River, in an area north of West Milan. The majority of the Paris community is located in the western part of the town of Dummer, but it also includes a small portion of Stark around the area of Pike Pond. The Stark portion of Paris is sometimes referred to as "Crystal".

Phillips Brook

Phillips Brook is a 19.6 mile long (31.6 km) river in northern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Upper Ammonoosuc River and part of the Connecticut River watershed.

Phillips Brook rises in the township of Erving's Location, New Hampshire in the vicinity of Kelsey Notch and flows south through Odell, Millsfield and Dummer to join the Upper Ammonoosuc River in the town of Stark near the village of Crystal. For most of its length it flows through wild country with a long history of timber harvesting.

Saville Dam

Saville Dam is an earthen embankment dam with masonry work on the eastern branch of the Farmington River in southwestern Barkhamsted, Connecticut. The dam is 135 ft. (41 m) tall and 1,950 ft. (590 m) long and has an uncontrolled spillway on its western portion. It creates the Barkhamsted Reservoir which has a volume of 36.8 billion US gallons (139,000,000 m3) and is the primary water source for Hartford, Connecticut.

In 1927, the Metropolitan District Commission began to purchase land in the present-day footprint of the dam and reservoir. Construction of the dam commenced in 1936 while land to the north was being stripped of lumber and buildings.

Before the Metropolitan District Commission named the Saville Dam in 1940 in honor of its chief engineer, Caleb Mills Saville, it was referred to as the Bill's Brook Dam after the brook that ran near the site at the time.

The foundations for "Bill's Brook Dam" and the diversion tunnel for the East Branch of the Farmington River were completed in August 1934. Subsequently, the East Branch was diverted into the concrete conduit at the bottom of the Bill's Brook Dam site. The dam was completed in May 1940, at a total cost for dam and reservoir of $10M.Although the Saville Dam was completed in 1940, it was not until 1948 that the Barkhamsted Reservoir finally filled to capacity. The Farmington River East Branch is impounded for nearly 8 miles (13 km) behind the dam, with the northernmost open waters of Barkhamsted Reservoir terminating in Hartland, Connecticut just south of the Massachusetts border.The reservoir flooded many buildings and farms of Barkhamsted, including the village of Barkhamsted Hollow. The village of Barkhamsted Center, partially flooded, lies just to the west of the reservoir. Its remaining buildings are part of the Barkhamsted Center Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

South Weeks

South Weeks, or Mount Weeks-South Peak, is a mountain located in Coos County, New Hampshire.

The mountain is named for US Senator John W. Weeks (1860–1926) of nearby Lancaster, New Hampshire, the sponsor of the Weeks Act of 1911, under which the White Mountain National Forest was established.

South Weeks is part of the Pliny Range of the White Mountains.

South Weeks is flanked to the northeast by Mount Weeks, and to the southwest by Mount Waumbek.

South Weeks stands within the watershed of the upper Connecticut River, which drains into Long Island Sound in Connecticut.

The southeast side of the mountain drains by various streams into Keenan Brook, thence into the Upper Ammonoosuc River, a tributary of the Connecticut.

The north and west sides of the mountain drain into Garland Brook, thence into Stalbird Brook and the Israel River, another tributary of the Connecticut.

Stark, New Hampshire

Stark is a town in Coos County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 556 at the 2010 census. It has a famous covered bridge. The town includes the villages of Percy and Crystal as well as the village of Stark, located on the Upper Ammonoosuc River. New Hampshire Route 110 runs through Stark, east from U.S. Highway 3 in Groveton and northwest from Route 16 in Berlin. Much of the town is within the boundaries of the White Mountain National Forest.

Stark is part of the Berlin, NH–VT Micropolitan Statistical Area.

The Bulge

The Bulge is a mountain located in Coos County, New Hampshire.

The mountain is part of the Pilot Range of the White Mountains.

The Bulge is flanked to the northeast by The Horn, and to the southwest by Mount Cabot.

The Bulge stands within the watershed of the Connecticut River, which drains into Long Island Sound in Connecticut.

The southeast face of The Bulge drains into the headwaters of the West Branch of the Upper Ammonoosuc River, a tributary of the Connecticut River.

The north face of The Bulge drains north, thence into the West Branch of Mill Brook, and into the Upper Ammonoosuc.

The west face of The Bulge drains into Fox Brook, thence into Whipple Brook, Burnside Brook, Otter Brook, and the Israel River, another tributary of the Connecticut.

The Horn (New Hampshire)

The Horn is a mountain located in Coos County, New Hampshire. The mountain is part of the Pilot Range of the White Mountains. The Horn is flanked to the southwest by the Bulge.

The Horn stands within the watershed of the Upper Ammonoosuc River, which drains into the Connecticut River, and thence into Long Island Sound in Connecticut. The south face of the Horn drains into the headwaters of the West Branch of the Upper Ammonoosuc River. The northwest face of the Horn drains north, thence into the West Branch of Mill Brook, and into the Upper Ammonoosuc.

Unknown Pond lies to the northeast of the mountain and provides an excellent view of the peak. The open ledges on the summit face west, however, so it is difficult to see the pond from the top of the mountain. Because of The Horn's location in the northern White Mountains and its distance—5 miles (8.0 km)—from the nearest road, it is much less visited than other comparable summits in the White Mountains.

West Branch Upper Ammonoosuc River

The West Branch of the Upper Ammonoosuc River is a 6.1-mile (9.8 km) long river in northern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Upper Ammonoosuc River and part of the Connecticut River watershed. For most of its length, it is within the White Mountain National Forest.

The West Branch rises in the township of Kilkenny, New Hampshire in a basin on the east side of Mount Cabot, the highest peak in the Pilot Range. The river flows east into Berlin, passing the Berlin National Fish Hatchery at York Pond before joining the Upper Ammonoosuc River.

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