University of Kansas School of Medicine

The University of Kansas School of Medicine is a public medical school located on the University of Kansas Medical Center campuses in Kansas City, Kansas, and also Salina, Kansas, and Wichita, Kansas. The Kansas City campus is co-located with the independent University of Kansas Hospital, and they are commonly known collectively as KU Med.[1][2]

University of Kansas School of Medicine
KUMED Nima 01
TypeMedical school
EstablishedSeptember 6, 1905
AffiliationUniversity of Kansas
DeanRobert Simari, Executive Dean
Location, ,
United States

39°03′21″N 94°36′40″W / 39.05583°N 94.61111°WCoordinates: 39°03′21″N 94°36′40″W / 39.05583°N 94.61111°W
Websitemedicine.kumc.edu
KU School of Medicine logo

History

Medical instruction in the University of Kansas School of Medicine began in the 1880s with instruction in medical topics in the undergraduate school, influenced principally by chemistry professor Edgar Bailey. Medical degrees were not awarded. The idea was more fully developed when professor Samuel Wendell Williston came to Kansas from Yale in 1890 and proposed that a specific two-year course of study for medicine should be implemented at KU. In 1899, Williston was named the first dean of this two-year program at KU.

The official establishment of the school came in 1905, when the KU Board of Regents authorized the creation of a full four-year medical school at KU, accomplished by merging the existing two-year school in Lawrence with three medical colleges in the Kansas City area. The School of Medicine was officially opened on September 6, 1905.

Wichita Campus

University of Kansas School of Medicine elected to open a campus in Wichita in 1971. This campus received third and fourth year medical students for their clinical education and these students serve rotations at the Via Christi Health hospitals, Wesley Medical Center, and the Robert J. Dole VA Medical Center. Since 2011, the KU School of Medicine-Wichita has expanded to a four-year campus, serving students in their didactic and clinical education. There are over 200 students and 75 full-time faculty at the KU School of Medicine-Wichita. The Dean of the Wichita Campus is Garold Minns, M.D. Dean Minns is a 1976 graduate of the KU School of Medicine and completed his residency in Internal Medicine at the KU School of Medicine-Wichita.

With a mission focused on graduating physicians that will help bridge the primary care gap in Kansas, the KU School of Medicine-Wichita ranks first in the nation in percentage of graduates who go to rural areas, second in the nation for graduates who go to Health Personnel Shortage Areas, and sixth in the nation for producing primary care physicians. As part of their dedication to under-served populations, the school partners with the Guadalupe Clinic of the Diocese of Wichita and runs the JayDoc Community Clinic on Wednesday evenings and Saturdays. The JayDoc Community Clinic is staffed by volunteer medical students, residents, and community physicians and sees more than 500 patients each year.

The KU School of Medicine-Wichita also sponsors 13 residency programs in coordination with Via Christi Health and Wesley Medical Center. The residency programs offered by KU School of Medicine-Wichita are:

  • Anesthesiology
  • Family Medicine (at Smokey Hill, Via Christi Health, and Wesley Medical Center)
  • Internal Medicine
  • Medicine/Pediatrics
  • Obstetrics/Gynecology
  • Orthopedic Surgery
  • Pediatrics
  • Psychiatry
  • Radiology
  • Sports Medicine
  • Surgery (General)

KU School of Medicine-Wichita also operates a multitude of patient care clinics such as Adult Health, Breast Cancer, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Psychology.

In addition to their MD program, the school offers an Office of Research and a Masters in Public Health graduate degree program. The KU-MPH program ranks the sixth best community health graduate degree program in the country by U.S. News & World Report.[3]

Notable alumni

References

  1. ^ "How KU Med came to KCK (and not Topeka)". The Kansas City Star. June 9, 2017. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  2. ^ "KU Med works to prevent concealed weapons on campus". The University Daily Kansan. March 17, 2017. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  3. ^ "KU School of Medicine–Wichita: About Us". wichita.kumc.edu. Retrieved 2016-01-14.

External links

Archie W. Butcher

Archie W. Butcher (April 29, 1901 – May 29, 1981) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Ottawa University in Ottawa, Kansas from 1928 to 1929 and at Oklahoma Baptist University in 1930, compiling a career college football record of 6–16–2. Butcher was also the head basketball coach at Oklahoma Baptist for one season, in 1930–31, tallying a mark of 5–10.

He obtained a degree in Medicine from the University of Kansas School of Medicine in 1935, practicing in Miltonvale and Wakefield before moving to Abilene where he retired in 1976. Butcher died in 1981 at the age of 80.

Danny Welch

For the other people with a similar name, see Daniel Welch (disambiguation).Danny Ray Welch is an American Cancer Biologist and founding director of the University of Kansas Medical Center's Department of Cancer Biology. Welch is also a Professor at the University of Kansas School of Medicine and Director of the NFCR Center for Metastasis Research at KU. His research is in the area of Metastasis Suppressor Genes and the biology of metastasis.

He is best known for his discovery of 4 of the 24 known metastasis suppressor genes. By definition, these genes suppress metastasis without suppressing growth of the primary tumor. He is also well known for his work in defining the characters of cancer metastasis, and for his mentoring.

In 1996, Welch’s lab in Hershey, Pennsylvania isolated a cDNA from a cancer cell that was not able to undergo metastasis after the human chromosome 6 was added to the cell. This gene was named KISS1 because of the location of where it was discovered (Hershey, Pennsylvania, home of Hershey's Kiss). Introduction of this chromosome into the once active cancer cell inhibited it from spreading and the cDNA responsible was taken from that cell. The fact that KISS1 was responsible for this was proved when it was transfected into melanoma cells and yet again, metastasis was suppressed.

He is a member of the editorial board of the Cancer and Metastasis Reviews.He is the author of the book "Cancer Metastasis -- Related Genes" (CANCER METASTASIS—BIOLOGY AND TREATMENT Volume 3) by Kluwer Academic Publications (Now Springer). He has authored over 140 original research papers in the area of cancer biology and metastasis. Welch is one of the few researchers whose research has focused on unraveling the biology of cancer metastasis from the very beginning of his research career.

Darrell Abernethy

Darrell R. Abernethy was an American Associate Director for Drug Safety in the Office of Clinical Pharmacology at the Food and Drug Administration.

Forest Tennant

Forest S. Tennant Jr. is an American physician, writer, businessman, consultant, and former mayor of West Covina, California. Tennant has earned recognition as an expert in pain management and substance dependence and has also been involved in some controversies. Currently, the physician's focus is on researching and developing new treatment protocols for Adhesive Arachnoiditis, an incurable inflammatory condition that is one of the toughest to treat in the pain management field.

George L. Blackburn

George L. Blackburn was the S. Daniel Abraham Professor of Nutrition and Associate Director of the Division of Nutrition at Harvard Medical School. He was also Director of the Center for the Study of Nutrition Medicine (CSNM) in the Roberta and Stephen R. Weiner Department of Surgery, and Director of the new Feihe Nutrition Laboratory at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), Boston, Massachusetts.

Jeff Colyer

Jeffrey William Colyer (born June 3, 1960) is an American surgeon who served as the 47th governor of Kansas from January 31, 2018 to January 14, 2019. A Republican, he served as the 49th lieutenant governor of Kansas from 2011 to 2018, as a member of the Kansas Senate from 2009 to 2011, and in the Kansas House of Representatives from 2007 to 2009. Colyer became governor of Kansas when Governor Sam Brownback resigned to take an ambassador position.

Colyer ran for a full term as governor in 2018, but was narrowly defeated in the Republican primary by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who in turn lost the general election to the Democratic nominee, State Senator Laura Kelly.

Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences

The Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal that was originally published by the Department of the History of Medicine at Yale University and now is continued by Oxford University Press. It covers research on the history of medicine and was established in 1946. The editor-in-chief is Christopher Crenner (University of Kansas School of Medicine). According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2011 impact factor of 0.714.

Neighborhoods of Wichita, Kansas

The following is a list of neighborhoods in Wichita, Kansas, United States.

Paul Randall Harrington

Paul Randall Harrington (September 27, 1911 – November 29, 1980) was an American orthopaedic surgeon. He is best known as the designer of the Harrington Rod, the first device for the straightening and immobilization of the spine inside the body. It entered common use in the early 1960s and remained the gold standard for scoliosis surgery until the late 1990s. During this period over one million people benefited from Harrington's procedure.

Roger Marshall (politician)

Roger Wayne Marshall (born August 9, 1960) is an American politician and obstetrician serving as the U.S. Representative for Kansas's 1st congressional district. He was first elected in 2016 and as of 2019, he is the Dean of Kansas's House Delegation. Marshall is a member of the Republican Party.

Roger Reitz

Roger P. Reitz (born November 11, 1932) is an American doctor and politician, who served as a Republican member of the Kansas Senate, representing the 22nd District, 2005-2013.

Reitz served as a representative in the Kansas House of Representatives from 2002 to 2005. He previously had served as mayor and city commissioner for the Manhattan City Commission and was president and member of Unified School District 383 School Board. Reitz graduated from Kansas State University and is graduated from the University of Kansas School of Medicine in 1959 with an M.D.. He served in the United States Army as a physician. He is a practicing, board-certified doctor of internal medicine.

He is married to Virginia Reitz and lives in Manhattan. He and his wife have five children.

Rubén Moreno Palanques

Rubén Moreno Palanques (Castellón, Spain, 23 July 1958) is a Spanish politician who belongs to the People's Party (PP).

Moreno qualified as a medical doctor at the University of Valencia and then moved to the United States, where he worked as a Postdoctoral researcher in Molecular biology at the University of Kansas in the Department of Pathology and Oncology. There, he was director of the Laboratory of Genetic diseases. After 7 years in the US, he returned to Spain, where he served as Director of Molecular Oncology at the University Clinic of Navarre. He later served as Director of the Valencian Health Service and under-secretary of health for the Generalitat Valenciana, the Valencian regional administration.At the 2011 general election, he was elected to the Spanish Congress of Deputies representing Valencia Province. After being considered for the post of Health Minister by Mariano Rajoy, he was named health minister for the Generalitat Valenciana. He held this post until June 2015, when the PP administration in Valencia region was replaced by a PSOE-led coalition. For the 2015 general election Moreno was placed third on the PP list and was re-elected as one of the five PP deputies in Valencia Province.

Theodore K. Lawless

Theodore Kenneth (T.K.) Lawless (December 6, 1892 – May 1, 1971) was an African-American dermatologist, medical researcher, and philanthropist. He was a skin specialist, and is known for work related to leprosy and syphilis.Lawless was also involved in various charitable causes, including Jewish causes. Related to the latter, he created the Lawless Department of Dermatology in Beilinson Hospital, Tel Aviv, Israel. He received his M.D. degree from Northwestern University Medical School, and was a self-made millionaire.

In 1954, he won the NAACP Spingarn Medal, presented annually to a Black American of distinguished achievement.

Tom Curran (medical researcher)

Thomas Curran FRS is a Scottish medical researcher. He is the Executive Director and Chief Scientific Officer of the Children’s Research Institute at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, where he is also the Donald J. Hall Eminent Scholar in Pediatric Research. He is also a Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine and a Professor of Cancer Biology at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. Before taking his current positions in 2016, he was a Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, where he also served as Associate Director of Translational Genomics at the Penn Genome Frontiers Institute.

Towne East Square

Towne East Square is an enclosed, two-story shopping mall located in the eastern section of Wichita, Kansas United States. It has 122 stores and restaurants in 1,134,931 square feet (105,438.5 m2) of gross leasable area. Dillard's, JCPenney, Sears and Von Maur (opened in 2002 on the site of original anchor Henry's, which closed in 1992 and demolished in 2000) are the mall's anchor stores. The mall opened in 1975 and was the first large, modern, multi-level enclosed mall in Wichita. The area around the mall was altered heavily in recent years as several businesses and hotels were demolished for the expansion and addition of a flyover on Highways 54/400 (Locally signed Kellogg). Simon has purchesed much of the vacated land for redevelopment. On December 28, 2018, it was announced that Sears would be closing as part of a plan to close 80 stores nationwide. The store will close in March 2019.

U. Diane Buckingham

Ulisa Diane Buckingham (born 1955) is an African-American psychiatrist known for her development of culturally sensitive diagnosis and treatment of mental illness in children and adolescents.Working in private practice and teaching at the University of Missouri, Kansas City School of Medicine, Buckingham's research focuses on ADHD, Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder. One of her aims is to challenge, through education, the reluctance of minority parents to allow their children to be evaluated by psychiatrists for fear of having them stigmatized. She is currently clinical assistant professor at the University Of Missouri Kansas City School Of Medicine and in private practice.

Ultimate Fakebook

Ultimate Fakebook is a 3-piece power pop band from Manhattan, KS. They released three full-length albums—Electric Kissing Parties (1997 - Noisome Records), This Will Be Laughing Week (1999 - Noisome Records, 2000 - 550 Music/Epic Records), and Open up and Say Awesome (2002 -Initial Records). Shortly after releasing their EP Before We Spark (2003 - Initial Records), they broke up.

In 2007 Melin and Warnock both appeared on VH1's World Series of Pop Culture on the team, "Westerberg High." They advanced to the quarterfinals before being eliminated by "Three Men & A Little Lazy." Together, they now run a popular movie review and film pop culture website, scene-stealers.com.

On Dec. 30th, 2008, Ultimate Fakebook played a small reunion show for a friend's birthday at the recordBar in Kansas City MO. Then on Thursday, Feb. 5th 2009, Ultimate Fakebook reunited again, this time for a much larger "official" reunion show at the Uptown Theater in Kansas City. This was also a benefit for the JayDoc free clinic, where licensed volunteer physicians supervise University of

Kansas School of Medicine students who provide care to the area’s under-served populations. The clinic operates on a volunteer basis,with supplies and medicines purchased through grants and donations.

On December 18, 19, and 20th of 2009 the band opened for former touring mates and friends Motion City Soundtrack at Lincoln Hall in Chicago, IL.

On July 27, 2010, Ultimate Fakebook self-released their first album since 2003. A digital download comprising 16 original songs and one cover, the album is entitled "Daydream Radio Is Smiling Static" and is available exclusively on the band's website, www.ufbrocks.com.

As of 2013, the band are still active and are playing a show in their hometown on 28th Dec 2013 playing material from their "Daydream Radio is Smiling Static" album

William Clarke Wescoe

W. Clarke Wescoe was an American medical educator, physician, pharmacologist and academic administrator. He was selected as the dean of the University of Kansas School of Medicine at the age of 32 and served in that capacity from 1952 to 1960. He was the 10th chancellor of the University of Kansas from 1960 to 1969, leading the University during a time of both campus growth with the near doubling in enrollment and unrest during the 1960s. More than $40 million in new construction was completed, including most of the Daisy Hill residence halls.

William T. Fitzsimons

Lieutenant William T. Fitzsimons (1889—1917) was a United States Army officer in World War I, and is considered the first American officer killed in the war. Fitzsimons graduated from the University of Kansas School of Medicine in 1912.

Fitzsimons was killed in a German air raid on September 4, 1917 along with Pvt. Oscar Tugo, Pvt. Rudolph Rubino and Pvt. Leslie Woods, when bombs fell on Base Hospital No. 5 near Dannes-Camiers in Pas-de-Calais, France.

In 1920, Army Hospital 21 in Aurora, Colorado was officially renamed the Fitzsimons Army Hospital in his honor.

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