University of Hawaii–West Oahu

The University of Hawaiʻi–West Oʻahu (UHWO), is a public university. It is one of ten campuses of the University of Hawaiʻi system. It offers baccalaureate degrees in liberal arts and professional studies. UHWO opened in January 1976, and since 1981 has been fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.[5] In 2007 the school added first- and second-year subjects, becoming a four-year university.[6]

UHWO is the US' fastest-growing public baccalaureate school. It has one of the most diverse student populations among four-year public institutions, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education.[7][8] It is the newest campus in the UH,[9] It was established in part to provide access to higher education in Leeward Oʻahu.[10]

The university offers undergraduate education. It enrolled 3,182 students in fall 2018, many from Leeward Oʻahu.[11][12] UHWO also reaches students around the state with its Distance Learning program. About 10 percent of UH West Oʻahu’s enrollment list another island as their permanent address.[13][14][15]

UHWO has the highest percentage of distance and online courses and programs and the highest percentage of part-time students in UH.[16] UH West Oʻahu supports the study of Hawaiian language, history and culture.[17] The student:faculty ratio is 24:1.[18] Tuition is among the lowest in the nation.[19]

University of Hawaii–West Oahu
UHWO logo
TypePublic, co-ed state university
Established1976
ChancellorMaenette K. P. Ah Nee-Benham[1]
PresidentDavid Lassner[2]
Academic staff
123[3]
Students2,944 (Spring 2018)[4]
Location, ,
U.S.

21°21′19″N 158°03′23″W / 21.3552°N 158.0564°WCoordinates: 21°21′19″N 158°03′23″W / 21.3552°N 158.0564°W
ColorsRed and Black          
AffiliationsWASC
UH System
Websiteuhwo.hawaii.edu
Aerial view of University of Hawaii - West Oahu
Aerial view of the East Kapolei campus in 2013
University of Hawai'i - West O'ahu(1)
Campus in 2015

History

The idea for opening a second UH campus on Oʻahu formed in the mid-1960s over concern that the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa could not accommodate everyone.[20]

In 1966 the UH Board of Regents approved a plan calling for the opening of such a campus.[21] In 1970, UH executive Richard Kosaki was appointed chancellor for the proposed school known as West Oʻahu College.[22] Kosaki proposed a new campus to serve the growing population in Leeward Oʻahu, where college attendance lagged other areas on the island.[23]

Opponents held that another campus was not needed and would take resources from other campuses.[24]

The College was approved by the Board of Regents as an upper division school in 1975.[25] It opened in January 1976 with 75 students attending classes held at Mililani, Campbell and Pearl City high schools.[26] It moved later that year to a Newtown Square office building in ʻAiea, Hawaiʻi,[27] offering day and evening classes.[28] The institution gained WASC accreditation in February 1981 and moved adjacent to Leeward Community College in Pearl City.[29] It began outreach programs in 1981 and 1983 sending faculty to Kauaʻi and Maui to teach classes on weekends.[30]

In 1989 the school’s name changed to the University of Hawaiʻi-West Oʻahu to better identify it as part of the University of Hawaiʻi System.[31] It began planning to become a four-year institution.[32] UH West Oʻahu added lower-division curricula in 2007, and in 2012 moved to a newly built campus in Kapolei.[33]

An Administration and Health Science building was added in 2018, and construction on a building for the Academy for Creative Media began in January 2019.[34][35]

Academics

UH West Oʻahu has degree programs and concentrations that emphasize liberal arts and practical applications, including creative media, cybersecurity, facilities management, and sustainable community food systems. Students choose among eight degree offerings with more than 40 concentrations. The average class size in Fall 2018 was 20 students.[36]

Degrees and Concentrations (Fall 2019)
Degree Concentrations
Bachelor of Applied Science[37]
  • Creative Media
  • Culinary Management
  • Facilities Management
  • Information Security and Assurance
  • Information Technology
  • Respiratory Care
  • Sustainable Community Food Systems
  • Hawaiian and Indigenous Health & Healing
  • Health Information Management
  • Health Professions
Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration[37]
  • Accounting
  • Facilities Management
  • Finance
  • General Business Administration
  • Hospitality and Tourism
  • Management
  • Marketing
Bachelor of Arts in Humanities[37]
  • Creative Media
  • English
  • Hawaiian-Pacific Studies
  • History
  • Mathematics
  • Philosophy
Bachelor of Arts in Public Administration[37]
  • Community Health
  • Disaster Preparedness & Emergency Management
  • Health Care Administration
  • General Public Administration
  • Justice Administration
  • Long-Term Care
Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences[37]
  • Anthropology
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Economics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
Bachelor of Education[37]
  • Elementary Education
  • Middle-Level Education
  • Secondary Education
Bachelor of Arts in Creative Media[37]
  • General Creative Media
  • Communications and New Media Technologies
  • Design and Media
  • Video Game Design and Development
Bachelor of Science in Natural Science[37]
  • Applied Mathematics

A concentration is a subfield within a degree area.[11] For example, Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration students take broad classes, and can also focus on a specific subfield or concentration, such as accounting. Each major requires that students complete a capstone course (e.g. senior project or senior practicum) except for Education, which culminates in a 15-week Student Teaching semester.[37]

Certificates

UHWO offers eight certificates:[38]

  • Applied Forensic Anthropology
  • Asian Studies
  • Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management
  • Health Care Administration
  • Music
  • Risk Management and Insurance
  • Substance Abuse and Addictions Studies
  • Gender Studies

Distance Learning

UHWO offers in-person and online classes. Twenty-nine percent of students were enrolled exclusively in distance education courses in Fall 2017; 38 percent took at least one such course.[39]

UH System Community College students on Neighbor Islands can pursue online four-year degrees and certificates at UHWO.[40] Classes may also be delivered through interactive television and in person.[40] Three degrees and 12 concentrations are available.[40]

UH West Oʻahu Distance Learning Degrees and Concentrations (Fall 2019)
Degree Concentrations
Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration
  • Accounting
  • General Business Administration
  • Hospitality and Tourism
  • Marketing
Bachelor of Arts in Public Administration
  • Community Health
  • Disaster Preparedness & Emergency Management
  • Health Care Administration
  • General Public Administration
  • Justice Administration
Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Political Science
  • Psychology

Distance Learning students may also earn four certificates:

  • Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management
  • Health Care Administration
  • Risk Management and Insurance
  • Substance Abuse and Addictions Studies[40]

Campus

The campus is located on 500 acres of former sugarcane land. The campus’ property includes a separate 991-acre parcel located above the H-1 Freeway.[41]

Clubs and organizations

Accounting Club

UH West Oʻahu offers an accounting club. The club was created in 2000 to network students with professionals and prepare their skills for the accounting industry.[42]

Student National Education Association

The Student National Education Association (SNEA), also known as Education Club, helps students to improve and expand their knowledge of the teaching profession. SNEA provides an opportunity for future teachers to connect with local teachers and participate in the national student leadership conference.[43]

Associated Students of University of Hawai'i, West Oahu

The Associated Students of University of Hawaiʻi–West Oʻahu (ASUHWO) is an organization of the student body government committee that helps support student groups and organizes school functions and funding. ASUHWO has committee officers such as President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer and other Senators from each class division.[44]

Athletics

UHWO features an intramural sports program. The program is available to all enrolled students. The program includes of five sports including: flag football, volleyball, basketball, soccer and softball.[45]

Chancellors

  • Maenette K.P. Benham 2017–present[46]
  • Rockne C. Freitas 2013-2016[47]

Recognition

The University of Hawaii–West Oahu was included on the 2010 List of Military Friendly Schools.[48]

In 2009 the school was awarded a federal grant to create a recovery center and service learning programs in the Leeward community of Waiʻanae.[49]

In the same year UHWO faculty received a grant from the National Park Service to conduct research on the World War II-era Honouliuli internment site in West Oʻahu.[50]

References

  1. ^ UH West Oʻahu Chancellor's Office webpage/
  2. ^ "Office of the President :: University of Hawaii System". www.hawaii.edu.
  3. ^ "General Catalog".
  4. ^ "University of Hawaii System | 10 campuses across the Hawaiian Islands".
  5. ^ "Accreditation is coming soon". westoahu.hawaii.edu.
  6. ^ "Midweek.com West Coverstory - April 4, 2007".
  7. ^ "Fastest-Growing Colleges, 2005-15". Chronicle of Higher Education. August 13, 2017. Retrieved July 15, 2019.
  8. ^ "Colleges with the Greatest Racial and Ethnic Diversity". Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved July 15, 2019.
  9. ^ "The University of Hawaii at Hilo". Wikipedia. See infobox - Established. Retrieved July 22, 2019.
  10. ^ Edward Kormondy. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The First Forty Years 1966-2006. University of Hawaii-West Oahu. p. 5. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  11. ^ a b "Enrollment (Census)". University of Hawaii System Institutional Research & Analysis Office. Retrieved July 16, 2019.
  12. ^ "Quick Enrollment Facts Dashboard". University of Hawaii-West Oahu. Bottom left corner. Retrieved July 22, 2019.
  13. ^ "Reaching across the water: UH West Oʻahu students graduate on neighbor Islands". University of Hawaii News. Retrieved July 18, 2019.
  14. ^ "2018-2019 Statistical Quick Reference Guide" (PDF). University of Hawaii-West Oahu. Retrieved July 18, 2019.
  15. ^ "Reaching across the water: UH West Oʻahu students graduate on the neighbor islands". 5th paragraph: University of Hawaii-West Oahu. June 4, 2019. Retrieved July 22, 2019.
  16. ^ "Integrated Academic and Facilities Plan for the University of Hawaii System" (PDF). Hawaii.edu. April 20, 2017. pp. 8, last paragraph. Retrieved July 16, 2019.
  17. ^ "Hawaii Papa O Ke Ao". University of Hawaii. Paragraphs 1 and 2. Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  18. ^ "UH West Oahu: At a Glance | University of Hawaii System".
  19. ^ "University Of Hawaii West Oahu, Hawaii". citytowninfo.com.
  20. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. first paragraph: University of Hawaii-West Oahu. p. 7. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  21. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. University of Hawaii-West Oahu. p. xv. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  22. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. 5th, 6th paragraphs: University of Hawaii-West Oahu. p. 2. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  23. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. 3rd, 4th paragraphs: University of Hawaii-West Oahu. p. 3. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  24. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. University of Hawaii-West Oahu. pp. 6, 7. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  25. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. University of Hawaii-West Oahu. p. xvi. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  26. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. University of Hawaii-West Oahu. pp. 12, xvii. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  27. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. University of Hawaii-West Oahu. p. 16. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  28. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. University of Hawaii-West Oahu. pp. xvii. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  29. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. University of Hawaii-West Oahu. pp. xvii. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  30. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. University of Hawaii-West Oahu. pp. xvii. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  31. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. University of Hawaii-West Oahu. p. 41. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  32. ^ Kormondy, Edward. The University of Hawaii-West Oahu: The first Forty Years 1966-2006. University of Hawaii-West Oahu. pp. xviii. ISBN 978-0-8248-3506-4.
  33. ^ "Campus Insights". University of Hawaii-West Oahu Strategic Action Plan. 1st paragraph. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  34. ^ "UH West Oʻahu's Administration and Health Science building celebrated, showcased". E Kamakani Hou. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  35. ^ "Construction on Creative Media facility begins as dignitaries gather for groundbreaking". E Kamakani Hou. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  36. ^ "Course Registration Report" (PDF). UH System Institutional Research & Analysis Office. p. 34. Retrieved July 22, 2019.
  37. ^ a b c d e f g h i UH West Oahu 2019-2020 General Catalog. UH West Oahu. pp. 59–60. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  38. ^ "Certificates". University of Hawaii-West Oahu. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  39. ^ "University of Hawai'i – West O'ahu Peer Institution Revision 2019" (PDF). University of Hawaii West Oahu Institutional Research. p. 27. Retrieved July 29, 2019.
  40. ^ a b c d "UH West Oahu General Catalog". 2019–2020: 136. Retrieved July 16, 2019. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)CS1 maint: date format (link)
  41. ^ ""A tour of UH West Oahu lands"". University of Hawaii News. September 30, 2014. Retrieved July 16, 2019.
  42. ^ "Home | Accounting Club at UHWO". acctclubatuhwo. Retrieved 2019-08-02.
  43. ^ University of Hawaiʻi–West Oʻahu Education Club, https://www.sneauhwo.org/about-us, retrieved on 12 April 2018.
  44. ^ "The Associated Students of the University of Hawai'i - West O'ahu". The Associated Students of the University of Hawai'i - West O'ahu. Retrieved 2019-08-02.
  45. ^ University of Hawaiʻi–West Oʻahu Intramural Sports, https://www.uhwo.hawaii.edu/im/about-us/, retrieved 12 April 2018.
  46. ^ University of Hawaiʻi–West Oʻahu Chancellor's Office, https://www.uhwo.hawaii.edu/about-us/chancellors-office/, retrieved 12 April 2018.
  47. ^ University of Hawaiʻi–West Oʻahu General Catalog (Kapolei, HI: University of Hawaiʻi–West Oʻahu, 2015-2016), 5.
  48. ^ 2010 Guide to Military Friendly Schools, retrieved on October 21, 2009
  49. ^ "KGMB 9 News Hawaiʻi, retrieved on October 21, 2009".
  50. ^ "West Oʻahu: UH West O'ahu receives grant to study historic Honouliuli site | University of Hawaii News". www.hawaii.edu.

External links

Carol Bennett

Carol Bennett (born 1954), is a Hawaii based painter and glass artist.

David Nandi Odhiambo

David Nandi Odhiambo (born June 24, 1965) is an African-Canadian novelist and writer of Luo and Luhya descent. He was born in Nairobi, Kenya, and moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, in 1977. He has a PhD in English Literature from the University of Hawaiʻi, Mānoa, an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and a B.A. in Classics from McGill University. In 2019 he was one of two recipients of the Elliot Cades Award for Literature, considered among the most prestigious literary honors bestowed in Hawaiʻi. As of fall 2019, he is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Hawaiʻi - West Oʻahu.Odhiambo has published four novels: diss/ed banded nation in 1998, Kipligat's Chance in 2003, and The Reverend's Apprentice, Volume I in 2008, and Smells like Stars in 2018.

Eric Chock

Eric Chock is a Hawaiian poet, scholar and editor. He served as a professor of English and humanities at the University of Hawaii-West Oahu, and coordinated the state's "Poets in the Schools" program for more than twenty years.In 1978, he cofounded the literary journal Bamboo Ridge with Darrell H. Y. Lum to encourage the growth of a distinctly Hawaiian literary style. Authors whose works appeared in Bamboo Ridge included Gary Pak, Lois-Ann Yamanaka, Rodney Morales, Wing Tek Lum, and Cathy Song. Pak described the journal as "the primary literary force in Hawaii today", and it received the Hawaii Award for Literature in 1996 from the Hawaii Literary Arts Council. The success and influence of the Bamboo Ridge group of writers, among whom Chock himself was included, was later examined in detail by literary critic Rob Wilson in his study Reimagining the American Pacific.Chock has also edited several anthologies featuring Hawaiian writers, as well as Small Kid Time Hawaii and Haku Mele o Hawaii, two collections of children's poetry.He received the Elliot Cades Award for Literature in 1996.

Frank Marshall Davis

Frank Marshall Davis (December 31, 1905 – July 26, 1987) was an American journalist, poet, political and labor movement activist, and businessman.

Davis began his career writing for African-American newspapers in Chicago. He moved to Atlanta, where he became the editor of the paper he turned into the Atlanta Daily World. He later returned to Chicago. During this time, he was outspoken about political and social issues, while also covering topics that ranged from sports to music. His poetry was sponsored by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) under President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal programs. He also played a role in the South Side Writers Group in Chicago, and is considered among the writers of the Black Chicago Renaissance.In the late 1940s, Davis moved to Honolulu, Hawaii, where he ran a small business. He became involved in local labor issues. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) tracked his activities as they had investigated union activists since the early 20th century. Davis died in 1987 in Hawaii.

Gamma Iota Sigma

Gamma Iota Sigma (ΓΙΣ) is a college academic fraternity, founded on April 16, 1966 at The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Gamma Iota Sigma is an international professional fraternity organized to promote, encourage and sustain student interest in insurance, risk management and actuarial science as professions. It aims to encourage high moral and scholastic attainments and to facilitate the interaction and cooperation of educational institutions, industry, and professional organizations by fostering research, scholarship, and improved public relations.

Gary Hooser

Gary L. Hooser (born January 19, 1954) is an American politician and the former State Senate Majority Leader representing Kauaʻi and Niʻihau since 2002. He formerly served on the Kauaʻi County Council for 4 years before becoming a Senator.

In the summer of 2010, Hooser resigned his Senate seat to run for the office of Lieutenant Governor of Hawaiʻi. He was defeated on September 18, 2010 in the Democratic primary by Brian Schatz. He served on the Kaua'i County Council from 2014-2016 until defeated by Mason Chock. Hooser currently is president of Hawaii' Alliance for Progressive Action advocacy group.

Glenn Medeiros

Glenn Alan Medeiros (born June 24, 1970) is an American educator and a former singer and songwriter of Portuguese descent who achieved chart success in the late 1980s and early 1990s. He is best known on the national and international music scene for his 1987 global smash, "Nothing's Gonna Change My Love for You", and "She Ain't Worth It", a US chart-topper in 1990. He has remained regularly involved in the music industry in his home State of Hawaii (including several headliner and related musical variety shows in Waikiki) long after achieving global success decades ago.

After his musical career peaked, he taught and was vice-principal at the Maryknoll School, a parochial school in Honolulu, Hawaii, and as a Professor at Chaminade University, a well-established private Marianist University which shares grounds with Saint Louis School. On July 1, 2015, Medeiros became the Head of School/Principal of Saint Louis School in Honolulu and in 2017 its President/CEO.

Hawaii Tokai International College

Hawaii Tokai International College (HTIC) is an American two-year liberal arts college located in Kapolei, Hawaii. It was established in Honolulu on May 22, 1992, in the Mo‘ili‘ili community neighboring Waikiki. Initially called "Tokai International College," its first academic term began on October 8, 1992. In April 2015, HTIC relocated to its new campus in Kapolei, adjacent to the University of Hawaii–West Oahu campus. The only American campus of the Tokai University Educational System (TES) of Japan, HTIC reflects the combined educational philosophies of Tokai founder Shigeyoshi Matsumae and former University of Hawaii Chancellor Richard Kosaki.

Henry Aquino

Henry James C. Aquino (born May 27, 1977 in Honolulu, Hawaii) is an American politician and a Democratic member of the Hawaii House of Representatives since January 16, 2013 representing District 38. Aquino consecutively served from 2009 until 2013 in the District 35 seat.

Hilo massacre

The Hilo massacre, also known as Bloody Monday, was an incident that occurred on 1 August 1938, in Hilo, Hawaii, when over 70 police officers attempted to disband 200 unarmed protesters during a strike, injuring 50 of the demonstrators. In their attempts to disband the crowd, officers tear gassed, hosed and finally fired their riot guns, leading to 50 injuries, but no deaths.These protesters were from a number of ethnicities, including Chinese, Japanese, Native Hawaiian, Luso and Filipino Americans, and from many different unions, including the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union. The different groups, long at odds, put aside their differences to challenge the Inter-Island Steam Navigation Company. The unions, led by longshoreman Harry Kamoku, demanded equal wages with workers on the West Coast of the United States and closed shop or union shop.Strikes began on 4 February 1938, and culminated on 1 August when 200 workers gathered to protest the arrival of the SS Waialeale, a steamship owned by the Inter-Island Steam Navigation Company. The protesters were ordered to disband, but refused to comply. Force was used, resulting in hospitalizations.

Isami Enomoto

Isami Enomoto (May 17, 1929 – February 16, 2016) was a ceramicist from Hawaii. He is best known for his labor murals, which are on display at the University of Hawaii, West Oahu library.

Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii

The Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii (JCCH) is a cultural center and history museum in Moiliili, Hawaii that focuses on the Japanese-American experience in Hawaii, especially internment.

List of colleges and universities in Hawaii

This is a list of colleges and universities in Hawaii. This list also includes other accredited educational institutions providing higher education, meaning tertiary, quaternary, and, in some cases, post-secondary education.

List of universities in Polynesia

This is a list of universities and other higher education institutions in Polynesia.

Rocky Freitas

Rockne Crowningburg "Rocky" Freitas (born September 7, 1945) is a former American football offensive tackle who played for the Detroit Lions and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in an eleven-year career that lasted from 1968 to 1978 in the National Football League.

Freitas played college football at Oregon State University and was drafted in the third round of the 1967 NFL Draft by the Pittsburgh Steelers. He was selected to the Pro Bowl after the 1972 season. His son Makoa was selected in the 2003 NFL Draft by the Indianapolis Colts.

Freitas is currently the Chancellor at the University of Hawaii–West Oahu (UHWO). In November 2010, he was instrumental in negotiating a move of the UH football team from the Western Athletic Conference to the Mountain West Conference, which is to take place before the 2012 season.

Freitas is a former chancellor of Hawaii Community College in Hilo, Hawaii.

Ross Cordy

Dr. Ross H. Cordy was the branch chief of archaeology in the State of Hawaii's Historic Preservation Division, having headed that office and program for 16 years. He is currently the Humanities Division Chair at the University of Hawaii-West Oahu where he teaches Hawaiian and Pacific Islands studies courses and a few archeology courses. Dr. Cordy is a volunteer archeology instructor for the Waianae High School - Hawaiian Studies Program where he teaches hands on archeology, history and historic preservation issues.

He has conducted research on Hawaiian archaeological and historical topics since 1968. He has done fieldwork throughout the Hawaiian Islands, on all the major Micronesian Islands, and in the Society Islands, and taught at universities in New Zealand. His writings include more than 80 published articles, books and monographs and numerous manuscript papers on a wide variety of Pacific subjects.

Dr. Cordy was raised in Davis, California, and received his BA from University of California, Santa Barbara, MA from University of Michigan and Ph.D from University of Hawaii-Manoa. Dr. Cordy is part of a family of researchers and academics. His sister, Dr. Ann Cordy Ph.D is a textile specialist who has studied Oceanic textiles. His mother, Elizabeth Cordy M.A. was also a textile specialist. Dr. Ross Cordy's father, Dr. Donald R. Cordy was a founding member of the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. He chaired the pathology department from 1960 until 1969. His wife, Diona Naboa, was the Oahu, Kauai, and Molokai archaeologist for the State Historic Preservation Office of Hawaii for five years and is currently the historic preservationist specialist for the State Department of Transportation in charge of environmental review, permitting, and compliance in State and Federal law. His cousin, Alana Cordy-Collins was an anthropologist and archaeologist who specialized in Peruvian prehistory, and her father was Mayanist Napoleon Cordy.

The Journal of Educational Research

The Journal of Educational Research is a bimonthly peer-reviewed academic journal covering research into education. It was established in 1920 and is published by Taylor & Francis. The editor-in-chief is Mary F. Heller (University of Hawaii–West Oahu). According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2016 impact factor of 1.197.

University of Hawaii

The University of Hawaiʻi system (formally the University of Hawaiʻi and popularly known as UH) is a public, co-educational college and university system that confers associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees through three university campuses, seven community college campuses, an employment training center, three university centers, four education centers and various other research facilities distributed across six islands throughout the state of Hawaii in the United States. All schools of the University of Hawaii system are accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The U.H. system's main administrative offices are located on the property of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa in Honolulu CDP.

Upper division college

An upper division college is a type of educational institution that traces its roots to educational ideas put forward in the late 19th and early 20th century. They were developed primarily in the United States during the 1960s in response to the growing number of community college students seeking to continue their education. They differ from a regular college or university in that they do not provide the first two years of undergraduate instruction and require applicants to already have completed two years of study at another institution.

Universities
Community Colleges
Schools and Departments
Public institutions
Private institutions
Community/Junior Colleges
Graduate, professional and
research institutions

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.