University of Hawaii

The University of Hawaiʻi system (formally the University of Hawaiʻi and popularly known as UH) is a public, co-educational college and university system that confers associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees through three university campuses, seven community college campuses, an employment training center, three university centers, four education centers and various other research facilities distributed across six islands throughout the state of Hawaii in the United States. All schools of the University of Hawaii system are accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The U.H. system's main administrative offices are located on the property of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa in Honolulu CDP.[3][4][5]

University of Hawaiʻi System
University of Hawaii seal
Motto"Ma luna aʻe o nā lāhui a pau ke ola ke kanaka" (Hawaiian)
Motto in English
"Above all nations is humanity"
Established1907
Affiliation
EndowmentUS$321 million[1]
PresidentDavid Lassner
Students50,310
Location, ,
US
Campus3 campuses, 7 community colleges, 5 research centers, 3 university centers, 4 education centers
ColorsGold and black[2]
         
Websitewww.hawaii.edu
University of Hawaii system logo
University of Hawaii locations
Black pog.svg Black: Universities; Red pog.svg Red: Colleges.

Colleges and universities

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa is the flagship institution of the University of Hawaiʻi system. It was founded as a land-grant college under the terms of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. It is well respected for its programs in Hawaiian/Pacific Studies, Astronomy, East Asian Languages and Literature, Asian Studies, Comparative Philosophy, Marine Science, Second Language Studies, along with Botany, Engineering, Ethnomusicology, Geophysics, Law, Business, Linguistics, Mathematics, and Medicine. The second-largest institution is the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo on the "Big Island" of Hawaiʻi, with over 3,000 students. The smaller University of Hawaiʻi-West Oʻahu in Kapolei primarily serves students who reside on Honolulu's western and central suburban communities. The University of Hawaiʻi Community College system comprises four community colleges island campuses on O'ahu and one each on Maui, Kauaʻi, and Hawaiʻi. The schools were created to improve accessibility of courses to more Hawaiʻi residents and provide an affordable means of easing the transition from secondary school/high school to college for many students. University of Hawaiʻi education centers are located in more remote areas of the State and its several islands, supporting rural communities via distance education.

Universities

Colleges

Community colleges

Professional schools

Research facilities

University centers

  • University of Hawaii Center West Hawaii
  • University of Hawaii Center Kauai
  • University of Hawaii Center Maui

Education centers

Board of regents

In accordance with Article X, Section 6 of the Hawaiʻi State Constitution, the University of Hawaiʻi system is governed by a Board of Regents, composed of 15 unpaid members who are nominated by a Regents Candidate Advisory Council, appointed by the governor, and confirmed by the state legislature. The Board oversees all aspects of governance for the university system, including its internal structure and management. The board also appoints, evaluates, and if necessary removes the President of the University of Hawaiʻi.[9]

Student regents

The University's governing board includes a current student appointed by the Governor of Hawaiʻi to serve a two-year term as a full voting regent. The practice of appointing a student to the Board was approved by the Hawaiʻi State Legislature in 1997.

Notable alumni

Alumni of the University of Hawaiʻi system include many notable persons in various walks of life. Senator Daniel Inouye and Tammy Duckworth both are veterans of the US military who were injured in the line of duty then later entered government service. Bette Midler and Georgia Engel are successful entertainers on the national stage. President Barack Obama's parents, Barack Obama Sr. and Ann Dunham, and half-sister, Maya Soetoro-Ng, also earned degrees from the Mānoa campus, where his parents met in a Russian language class. His mother earned three degrees from the University of Hawaiʻi including a PhD in anthropology.

Alice Augusta Ball was not only the first woman to graduate from the College of Hawaii (now the University of Hawaii) in 1915, but was also the first African American research chemist and instructor in the college’s chemistry department. In addition, she was the first person to successfully develop a water-soluble form of chaulmoogra oil that was used for decades to relieve the symptoms of Hansen’s disease (leprosy).[10]

Notable faculty

The University of Hawaiʻi system has had many faculty members of note. Many were visiting faculty or came after they won major awards like Nobel Laureate Georg von Békésy. Ryuzo Yanagimachi, principal investigator of the research group that developed a method of cloning from adult animal cells, is still on the faculty.

In July 2019, Bob Huey, a professor of Japanese literature in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, was presented the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon, one of Japan's highest honors for those without Japanese citizenship.[11]

See also

Further reading

  • Robert, Kamins (1998). Mālamalama: A History of the University of Hawaiʻi.
  • David, Yount (1996). Who Runs The University? The Politics of Higher Education In Hawaiʻi, 1985-1992.

References

  1. ^ "U.S. and Canadian Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 Endowment Market Value and Change* in Endowment Market Value from FY17 to FY18". nacubo.org. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
  2. ^ https://www.hawaii.edu/offices/eaur/graphicsstandards.pdf
  3. ^ Magin, Janis L. "Land deals could breathe new life into Mōʻiliʻili". Pacific Business News. Sunday July 1, 2007. Retrieved on October 5, 2011. "Dobelle at that time had even suggested moving the University of Hawaiʻi system offices from the Mānoa campus to office space in Mōʻiliʻili, something the current administration is not actively considering."
  4. ^ "Office of the President". University of Hawaiʻi System. Retrieved on October 5, 2011. "Office of the President; 2444 Dole Street; 202 Bachman Hall; Honolulu, Hawaii 96822"
  5. ^ "Office of the Board of Regents". University of Hawaiʻi System. Retrieved on October 5, 2011. "Executive Administrator and Secretary of the Board of Regents; 2444 Dole Street; Room 209, Bachman Hall; Honolulu, Hawaii 96822"
  6. ^ "Hawai'i Community College - PALAMANUI". hawaii.hawaii.edu.
  7. ^ "College of Pharmacy".
  8. ^ "University of Hawaii - Ocean Engineering & Law Education". EduMaritime.net.
  9. ^ "Description of Duties of the Board of Regents of the University of Hawaiʻi". 9 August 2007. Retrieved 14 September 2013.
  10. ^ https://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/1837
  11. ^ UH News (10 July 2019). "Japan grants high honor to UH professor". University of Hawai'i News. Retrieved 13 July 2019.

External links

Ann Dunham

Stanley Ann Dunham (November 29, 1942 – November 7, 1995) was an American anthropologist who specialized in the economic anthropology and rural development of Indonesia. She was the mother of Barack Obama, the 44th President of the United States. Dunham was known as Stanley Ann Dunham through high school, then as Ann Dunham, Ann Obama, Ann Soetoro, Ann Sutoro and finally after her second divorce as Ann Dunham.Born in Wichita, Kansas, Dunham studied at the East–West Center and at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in Honolulu, where she attained a bachelor of arts degree in anthropology (1967), and later received master of arts (1974) and PhD (1992) degrees, also in anthropology. She also attended University of Washington at Seattle in 1961–1962. Interested in craftsmanship, weaving, and the role of women in cottage industries, Dunham's research focused on women's work on the island of Java and blacksmithing in Indonesia. To address the problem of poverty in rural villages, she created microcredit programs while working as a consultant for the United States Agency for International Development. Dunham was also employed by the Ford Foundation in Jakarta and she consulted with the Asian Development Bank in Gujranwala, Pakistan. Towards the latter part of her life, she worked with Bank Rakyat Indonesia, where she helped apply her research to the largest microfinance program in the world.After her son was elected President, interest renewed in Dunham's work: the University of Hawaii held a symposium about her research; an exhibition of Dunham's Indonesian batik textile collection toured the United States; and in December 2009, Duke University Press published Surviving against the Odds: Village Industry in Indonesia, a book based on Dunham's original 1992 dissertation. Janny Scott, an author and former New York Times reporter, published a biography about Ann Dunham's life titled A Singular Woman in 2011. Posthumous interest has also led to the creation of The Ann Dunham Soetoro Endowment in the Anthropology Department at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, as well as the Ann Dunham Soetoro Graduate Fellowships, intended to fund students associated with the East–West Center (EWC) in Honolulu, Hawaii.In an interview, Barack Obama referred to his mother as "the dominant figure in my formative years ... The values she taught me continue to be my touchstone when it comes to how I go about the world of politics."

Banditry

Banditry is the life and practice of bandits. The New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (NED) defined "bandit" in 1885 as "one who is proscribed or outlawed; hence, a lawless desperate marauder, a brigand: usually applied to members of the organized gangs which infest the mountainous districts of Italy, Sicily, Spain, Greece, Iran, and Turkey".

In modern usage the word may become a synonym for "thief", hence the term "one-armed bandit" for gambling machines that can leave the gambler with no money.

Barack Obama Sr.

Barack Hussein Obama Sr. (; 18 June 1936 – 24 November 1982) was a Kenyan senior governmental economist and the father of Barack Obama, the 44th President of the United States. He is a central figure of his son's memoir, Dreams from My Father (1995). Obama married in 1954 and had two children with his first wife, Kezia. He was selected for a special program to attend college in the United States and studied at the University of Hawaii. There, Obama met Stanley Ann Dunham, whom he married in 1961, and with whom he had a son, Barack II. She divorced him three years later. The elder Obama later went to Harvard University for graduate school, where he earned an M.A. in economics, and returned to Kenya in 1964. He saw his son Barack once more, when he was about ten.

In late 1964, Obama Sr. married Ruth Beatrice Baker, a Jewish-American woman whom he had met in Massachusetts. They had two sons together before separating in 1971 and divorcing in 1973. Obama first worked for an oil company, before beginning work as an economist with the Kenyan Ministry of Transport. He gained a promotion to senior economic analyst in the Ministry of Finance. He was among a cadre of young Kenyan men who had been educated in the West in a program supported by Tom Mboya. Obama Sr. had conflicts with Kenyan President Jomo Kenyatta, which adversely affected his career. He was fired and blacklisted in Kenya, finding it nearly impossible to get a job. Obama Sr. was involved in three serious car accidents during his final years; he died as a result of the last one in 1982.

Cathy Church

Catherine "Cathy" Church (née Hoffman, born 1945) is an American marine biologist, diver, photographer and educator.

She received a BSc in biology from the University of Michigan, where she also learned to scuba dive. She studied marine biology at Hopkins Marine Station in California. She received an MSc in marine biology from the University of Hawaii.She did not pursue a career in science but instead went on to teach in school and pursue underwater photography.

From 1969 to 1987, she was married to Jim Church, a pioneer in underwater photography. With him, she developed photography courses which were offered through the National Association of Scuba Diving Schools (NASDS). Cathy co-wrote and published four books on underwater photography and contributed articles to various magazines. For fifteen years, she was co-photo editor for Skin Diver Magazine. She has done photography for various clients, including Kodak, Nikon, the United States Virgin Islands and the Cayman Islands.Church received a NOGI Award in 1985 and the Diving Equipment & Marketing Association's Reaching Out Award in 2000. She was named to the Women Divers Hall of Fame in 2000 and to the International Scuba Diving Hall of Fame in 2008.In January 2019, Cathy Church was involved in a boat collision in Grand Cayman's West Bay. During the afternoon hours of January 8, 2019, her boat was in transit to West Bay dock, when the helm was left unattended while the boat was underway at high speed. Ms Church's vessel then struck the side of another dive vessel that was moored on the popular dive attraction USS Kittiwake, narrowly missing snorkelers that were in the water at the time. The collision caused significant damage to the vessel Atatude—a 36-foot (11 m) dive boat belonging to Divetech of Grand Cayman.The matter was investigated by the Royal Cayman Islands Police Service Marine Unit, and on July 3, 2019 Church was formally charged with navigating a vessel so as to cause damage or risk of damage, and reckless and negligent act.

East–West Center

The East–West Center (EWC), or the Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange Between East and West, is an education and research organization established by the U.S. Congress in 1960 to strengthen relations and understanding among the peoples and nations of Asia, the Pacific, and the United States. It is headquartered in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Elwood Zimmerman

Elwood Curtin Zimmerman (born in Spokane, Washington on December 8, 1912; died in Tura Beach, New South Wales on June 18, 2004) was an American entomologist best known for his two multivolume series: Insects of Hawaii published by the University of Hawaiʻi Press and Australian Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea) published by Australia's CSIRO.

Gerald R. Allen

Gerald Robert "Gerry" Allen (born March 26, 1942 in Los Angeles, California) is an American-born Australian ichthyologist. His career began in 1963, when he spent a semester at the University of Hawaii, where he also received a PhD in marine zoology in 1971. In 1972, Allen wrote his doctoral thesis on the systematics and biology of the anemone fish.

In 1974, he was made curator at the Western Australian Museum in Perth till 1997, where Allen moved to Conservation International, working as a science team leader undertaking coral reef fish surveys in Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and the Philippines until 2003. Allen has written 33 books and about 400 scientific papers. In 2003, he received the K. Radway Allen Award from the Australian Society for Fish Biology for his outstanding scientific achievements in the field.He has mapped and analysed the distributions of all Indo-Pacific coral reef fishes. Allen continues to publish scientific papers and is involved in the nonprofit organisation Conservation International, especially for the preservation of biodiversity in the area of Vogelkop Peninsula.

Hawaii Rainbow Warriors and Rainbow Wahine

The University of Hawaiʻi Rainbow Warriors and Rainbow Wāhine are the athletic teams that represent the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (UH), in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi. The UH athletics program is a member of the Big West Conference in most sports and competes at the NCAA Division I level. It comprises seven men's, 12 women's, and two coed athletic teams.

Kinji Shibuya

Robert "Kinji" Shibuya (May 16, 1921 – May 3, 2010) was an American professional wrestler and actor.

Lolo Soetoro

Lolo Soetoro (EYD: Lolo Sutoro; Javanese: [ˈlɒlɒ suːˈtɒrɒː]; 2 January 1935 – 2 March 1987), also known as Lolo Soetoro Mangunharjo or Mangundikardjo, of Indonesia was the stepfather of Barack Obama, the 44th President of the United States.

Mauna Kea Observatories

The Mauna Kea Observatories (MKO) are a number of independent astronomical research facilities and large telescope observatories that are located at the summit of Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi, United States. The facilities are located in a 525-acre (212 ha) special land use zone known as the "Astronomy Precinct", which is located within the 11,228-acre (4,544 ha) Mauna Kea Science Reserve. The Astronomy Precinct was established in 1967 and is located on land protected by the Historical Preservation Act for its significance to Hawaiian culture.

The location is near ideal because of its dark skies from lack of light pollution, good astronomical seeing, low humidity, high elevation of 4,205 meters (13,796 ft), position above most of the water vapor in the atmosphere, clean air, good weather and low latitude location.

Maya Soetoro-Ng

Maya Kasandra Soetoro-Ng (; born August 15, 1970) is the Indonesian-American maternal half-sister of the 44th United States president, Barack Obama. Formerly a high school history teacher, she is currently a consultant for the Obama Foundation, working to develop the Asia-Pacific Leaders Program, and a faculty specialist at the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace & Conflict Resolution, which is based in the College of Social Sciences at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

SPARK (rocket)

SPARK, or Spaceborne Payload Assist Rocket - Kauai, also known as Super Strypi, is an American expendable launch system developed by the University of Hawaii, Sandia and Aerojet Rocketdyne. Designed to place miniaturized satellites into low Earth and sun-synchronous orbits, it is a derivative of the Strypi rocket which was developed in the 1960s in support of nuclear weapons testing. SPARK is being developed under the Low Earth Orbiting Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) program, funded by the Operationally Responsive Space Office of the United States Department of Defense.

Stan Sheriff Center

The Stan Sheriff Center is a 10,300-seat multi-purpose arena in Honolulu CDP, City and County of Honolulu, Hawaii, on the campus of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Initially named the Special Events Arena when it opened in 1994, the arena was renamed in 1998 after Stan Sheriff (1932–1993), a former UH athletic director who lobbied for its construction.

University of Hawaii Press

The University of Hawaiʻi Press is a university press that is part of the University of Hawaiʻi.

The University of Hawaiʻi Press was founded in 1947, with the mission of advancing and disseminating scholarship by publishing current research in all disciplines of the humanities and natural and social sciences in the regions of Asia and the Pacific. In addition to scholarly monographs, the Press publishes educational materials and reference works such as dictionaries, language texts, classroom readers, atlases, and encyclopedias. During the 2006–2007 fiscal year, the Press published 94 projects: 80 books and monographs and 14 scholarly journals.

At 30 June 2007, the Press had published 2,323 books and other media, 1,289 of which are currently in print. With sales of over $3.7 million, the Press is ranked as a mid-sized university publisher by the Association of American University Presses and is considered by scholars to be a leader in the fields in which it publishes. In 2005, UH Press published more academic monographs on East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea) in English than any other university press, and was second only to RoutledgeCurzon among all English-language publishers (Chen & Wang 2008:37).

University of Hawaii at Manoa

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (also known as U.H. Mānoa, the University of Hawaiʻi, or simply U.H.) is a public co-educational research university as well as the flagship campus of the University of Hawaiʻi system. The school is located in Mānoa, an affluent neighborhood of Honolulu, Honolulu County, Hawaiʻi, United States, approximately three miles east and inland from downtown Honolulu and one mile (1.6 km) from Ala Moana and Waikīkī. The campus occupies the eastern half of the mouth of Mānoa Valley. The John A. Burns School of Medicine, part of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, is located in Kakaʻako, adjacent to the Kakaʻako Waterfront Park. The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges from the western mainland U.S. and is governed by the Hawaii State Legislature and a semi-autonomous board of regents, which in turn, hires a president to be administrator. This university campus also houses the main offices of the entire University of Hawaiʻi system.The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, along with Cornell University, Oregon State University and Pennsylvania State University, are the only institutions to be members of all four Land Grant, Sea Grant, Space Grant, and Sun Grant programs.

University of Hawaii–West Oahu

The University of Hawaiʻi–West Oʻahu (UHWO), is a public university. It is one of ten campuses of the University of Hawaiʻi system. It offers baccalaureate degrees in liberal arts and professional studies. UHWO opened in January 1976, and since 1981 has been fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. In 2007 the school added first- and second-year subjects, becoming a four-year university.UHWO is the US' fastest-growing public baccalaureate school. It has one of the most diverse student populations among four-year public institutions, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education. It is the newest campus in the UH, It was established in part to provide access to higher education in Leeward Oʻahu.The university offers undergraduate education. It enrolled 3,182 students in fall 2018, many from Leeward Oʻahu. UHWO also reaches students around the state with its Distance Learning program. About 10 percent of UH West Oʻahu’s enrollment list another island as their permanent address.UHWO has the highest percentage of distance and online courses and programs and the highest percentage of part-time students in UH. UH West Oʻahu supports the study of Hawaiian language, history and culture. The student:faculty ratio is 24:1. Tuition is among the lowest in the nation.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo or UH Hilo is a public co-educational university in Hilo, Hawaiʻi, United States. It is one of ten general campuses of the University of Hawaiʻi system. It was founded as Hawaiʻi Vocational College (Hawaiʻi College) in 1941. In 1970 it was reorganized by an act of the Hawaiʻi State Legislature.

The university has been accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges since 1976. It offers thirty-three undergraduate and three graduate degree programs, and has about 3000 students; most are residents of Hawaiʻi, but there are many international students too.

William S. Richardson School of Law

The University of Hawaii at Manoa William S. Richardson School of Law is a public law school located in the U.S. state of Hawaii in Honolulu. Named after its patriarch, former Hawaii State Supreme Court Chief Justice William S. Richardson, a zealous advocate of Hawaiian culture, it is the state's only law school.Richardson's regime of legal studies places special emphasis on fields of law of particular importance to Hawaii and the surrounding Pacific and Asian region, including Native Hawaiian Law, Pacific-Asian Legal Studies, Environmental Law, and maritime law.A member of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS), the school is accredited by the Council of the Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar of the American Bar Association (ABA). It offers a Juris Doctor, with certificates available in Native Hawaiian Law, Pacific-Asian Legal Studies, and Environmental Law, with students able to matriculate either full-time or part-time. It also offers an Advanced Juris Doctor, for foreign students who have earned a law degree abroad, and a LLM.

For 2016, U.S. News & World Report ranked Richardson as 82nd among the nations law schools. Richardson's part-time program was ranked 30th.

The University of Hawaii
Universities
Community Colleges
Schools and Departments

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