United States urban area

Urban areas in the United States are defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as contiguous census block groups with a population density of at least 1,000/sq mi (390/km2) with any census block groups around this core having a density of at least 500/sq mi (190/km2). Urban areas are delineated without regard to political boundaries. The census has two distinct categories of urban areas. Urbanized Areas have populations of greater than 50,000, while Urban Clusters have populations of less than 50,000 but more than 2,500. An urbanized area may serve as the core of a metropolitan statistical area, while an urban cluster may be the core of a micropolitan statistical area.

USA-Urban-Areas
An enlargeable map showing urban areas and urban clusters of the contiguous United States, based on the 2000 census.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Metropolitan and NECTA Divisions published by CES". U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. January 28, 2011.
  2. ^ "May 2009 Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Area Definitions". U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. August 16, 2010.

External links

Area (country subdivision)

In addition to its other uses, the word "area" may refer to any of the following types of country subdivisions:

Local Government Area

Insular area

Planning Areas of Singapore

Census Metropolitan Area

National Recreation Area

Lieutenancy area

Metropolitan area

Urban area

Combined Statistical Area

United States metropolitan area

United States urban area

Urban areas of New Zealand

Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

Demography of the United States

The United States is the third most populous country in the world with an estimated population of 328,915,700 as of May 20, 2019.The United States Census Bureau shows a population increase of 0.75% for the twelve-month period ending in July 2012. Though high by industrialized country standards, this is below the world average annual rate of 1.1%. The total fertility rate in the United States estimated for 2018 is 1.73 children per woman, which is below the replacement fertility rate of approximately 2.1.

The American population almost quadrupled during the 20th century—at a growth rate of about 1.3% a year—from about 76 million in 1900 to 281 million in 2000. It is estimated to have reached the 200 million mark in 1967, and the 300 million mark on October 17, 2006. Population growth is fastest among minorities as a whole, and according to the Census Bureau's estimation for 2012, 50.4% of American children under the age of 1 belonged to racial and ethnic minority groups.White people constitute the majority of the U.S. population, with a total of about 245,532,000 or 77.7% of the population as of 2013. Non-Hispanic whites make up 62.6% of the country's population. The non-Hispanic white population of the US is expected to fall below 50% by 2045.Hispanic and Latino Americans accounted for 48% of the national population growth of 2.9 million between July 1, 2005, and July 1, 2006. Immigrants and their U.S.-born descendants are expected to provide most of the U.S. population gains in the decades ahead.The Census Bureau projects a U.S. population of 417 million in 2060, a 38% increase from 2007 (301.3 million), and the United Nations estimates the U.S. population will be 402 million in 2050, an increase of 32% from 2007. In an official census report, it was reported that 54.4% (2,150,926 out of 3,953,593) of births in 2010 were non-Hispanic white. This represents an increase of 0.3% compared to the previous year, which was 54.1%.

List of United States urban areas

This is a list of urban areas in the United States as defined by the United States Census Bureau, ordered according to their 2010 census populations. In the table, UA refers to "urbanized area" (urban areas with population over 50,000) and UC refers to "urban cluster" (urban areas with population less than 50,000). The list includes urban areas with a population of at least 50,000.

For the 2010 census, the Census Bureau redefined the classification of urban areas to "a densely settled core of census tracts and/or census blocks that meet minimum population density requirements, along with adjacent territory containing non-residential urban land uses as well as territory with low population density included to link outlying densely settled territory with the densely settled core. To qualify as an urban area, the territory identified according to criteria must encompass at least 2,500 people, at least 1,500 of which reside outside institutional group quarters." These criteria result in several large urban agglomerations that encompass multiple urban areas from the 2000 census. The Census Bureau is currently considering whether to split up the larger agglomerations, but published potential agglomerations in August 2010.

Office of Management and Budget

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is the largest office within the Executive Office of the President of the United States (EOP). OMB's most prominent function is to produce the President's Budget, but OMB also measures the quality of agency programs, policies, and procedures to see if they comply with the president's policies and coordinates inter-agency policy initiatives.

While the current OMB Director is Mick Mulvaney, he is currently also the acting White House Chief of Staff. Many of his duties and responsibilities have been assigned to Deputy Director Russell Vought. The OMB Director reports to the President, Vice President and the White House Chief of Staff.

Satellite town

A satellite town or satellite city is a concept in urban planning that refers essentially to smaller metropolitan areas that are located close to, but are mostly independent of larger metropolitan areas. The satellite city is too far from the urban core to be considered part of the metropolitan area.

United States Census Bureau

The United States Census Bureau (USCB; officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

The Census Bureau's primary mission is conducting the U.S. Census every ten years, which allocates the seats of the U.S. House of Representatives to the states based on their population. The Bureau's various censuses and surveys help allocate over $400 billion in federal funds every year and it helps states, local communities, and businesses make informed decisions. The information provided by the census informs decisions on where to build and maintain schools, hospitals, transportation infrastructure, and police and fire departments.In addition to the decennial census, the Census Bureau continually conducts dozens of other censuses and surveys, including the American Community Survey, the U.S. Economic Census, and the Current Population Survey. Furthermore, economic and foreign trade indicators released by the federal government typically contain data produced by the Census Bureau.

Regions
Native areas
Metropolitan
State-level
County-level
Local

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