United States presidential elections in Vermont

Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Vermont, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1791, Vermont has participated in every U.S. presidential election.

Winners of the state are in bold.

Presidential elections in Vermont
Map of the United States with Vermont highlighted
No. of elections57
Voted Democratic8
Voted Republican33
Voted Whig5
Voted Democratic-Republican6
Voted Federalist2
Voted other2[a]
Voted for winning candidate35
Voted for losing candidate22

Elections from 1864 to present

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Other national
candidates[b]
Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
Notes
2016 Donald Trump 95,369 30.27 Hillary Clinton 178,573 56.68 Bernie Sanders[c] 18,218 5.68% 3
2012 Barack Obama 199,239 66.57 Mitt Romney 92,698 30.97 - 3
2008 Barack Obama 219,262 67.46 John McCain 98,974 30.45 - 3
2004 George W. Bush 121,180 38.80 John Kerry 184,067 58.94 - 3
2000 George W. Bush 119,775 40.70 Al Gore 149,022 50.63 - 3
1996 Bill Clinton 137,894 53.35 Bob Dole 80,352 31.09 Ross Perot 31,024 12.00 3
1992 Bill Clinton 133,592 46.11 George H. W. Bush 88,122 30.42 Ross Perot 65,991 22.78 3
1988 George H. W. Bush 124,331 51.10 Michael Dukakis 115,775 47.58 - 3
1984 Ronald Reagan 135,865 57.92 Walter Mondale 95,730 40.81 - 3
1980 Ronald Reagan 94,598 44.37 Jimmy Carter 81,891 38.41 John B. Anderson 31,760 14.90 3
1976 Jimmy Carter 81,044 43.14 Gerald Ford 102,085 54.34 - 3
1972 Richard Nixon 117,149 62.66 George McGovern 68,174 36.47 - 3
1968 Richard Nixon 85,142 52.75 Hubert Humphrey 70,255 43.53 George Wallace 5,104 3.16 3
1964 Lyndon B. Johnson 108,127 66.30 Barry Goldwater 54,942 33.69 - 3
1960 John F. Kennedy 69,186 41.35 Richard Nixon 98,131 58.65 - 3
1956 Dwight D. Eisenhower 110,390 72.16 Adlai Stevenson II 42,549 27.81 T. Coleman Andrews/
Unpledged Electors[d]
- 3
1952 Dwight D. Eisenhower 109,717 71.45 Adlai Stevenson II 43,355 28.23 - 3
1948 Harry S. Truman 45,557 36.92 Thomas E. Dewey 75,926 61.54 Strom Thurmond - 3
1944 Franklin D. Roosevelt 53,820 42.93 Thomas E. Dewey 71,527 57.06 - 3
1940 Franklin D. Roosevelt 64,269 44.92 Wendell Willkie 78,371 54.78 - 3
1936 Franklin D. Roosevelt 62,124 43.24 Alf Landon 81,023 56.39 - 3
1932 Franklin D. Roosevelt 56,266 41.08 Herbert Hoover 78,984 57.66 - 3
1928 Herbert Hoover 90,404 66.87 Al Smith 44,440 32.87 - 4
1924 Calvin Coolidge 80,498 78.22 John W. Davis 16,124 15.67 Robert M. La Follette Sr. 5,964 5.79 4
1920 Warren G. Harding 68,212 75.82 James M. Cox 20,919 23.25 - 4
1916 Woodrow Wilson 22,708 35.22 Charles E. Hughes 40,250 62.43 - 4
1912 Woodrow Wilson 15,354 24.43 Theodore Roosevelt 22,132 35.22 William H. Taft 23,332 37.13 4
1908 William H. Taft 39,552 75.08 William Jennings Bryan 11,496 21.82 - 4
1904 Theodore Roosevelt 40,459 77.97 Alton B. Parker 9,777 18.84 - 4
1900 William McKinley 42,569 75.73 William Jennings Bryan 12,849 22.86 - 4
1896 William McKinley 51,127 80.08 William Jennings Bryan 10,640 16.66 - 4
1892 Grover Cleveland 16,325 29.26 Benjamin Harrison 37,992 68.09 James B. Weaver 44 0.08 4
1888 Benjamin Harrison 45,192 69.05 Grover Cleveland 16,788 25.65 - 4
1884 Grover Cleveland 17,331 29.18 James G. Blaine 39,514 66.52 - 4
1880 James A. Garfield 45,091 69.81 Winfield S. Hancock 18,182 28.15 James B. Weaver 1,212 1.88 5
1876 Rutherford B. Hayes 44,091 68.30 Samuel J. Tilden 20,254 31.38 - 5
1872 Ulysses S. Grant 41,480 78.29 Horace Greeley 10,926 20.62 - 5
1868 Ulysses S. Grant 44,173 78.6 Horatio Seymour 12,051 21.4 - 5
1864 Abraham Lincoln 42,419 76.1 George B. McClellan 13,321 23.9 - 5

Election of 1860

The election of 1860 was a complex realigning election in which the breakdown of the previous two-party alignment culminated in four parties each competing for influence in different parts of the country. The result of the election, with the victory of an ardent opponent of slavery, spurred the secession of eleven states and brought about the American Civil War.

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
1860 Abraham Lincoln 33,808 75.7 Stephen A. Douglas 8,649 19.4 John C. Breckinridge 218 0.5 John Bell 1,969 4.4 5

Elections from 1828 to 1856

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Other national
candidates[b]
Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
Notes
1856 James Buchanan 10,577 20.84 John C. Frémont 39,561 77.96 Millard Fillmore 545 1.07 5
1852 Franklin Pierce 13,044 29.72 Winfield Scott 22,173 50.52 John P. Hale 8,621 19.64 5
1848 Zachary Taylor 23,132 48.27 Lewis Cass 10,948 22.85 Martin Van Buren 13,837 28.87 6
1844 James K. Polk 18,049 36.96 Henry Clay 26,780 54.84 - 6
1840 William Henry Harrison 32,445 63.9 Martin Van Buren 18,009 35.47 - 7
1836 Martin Van Buren 14,037 40.07 William Henry Harrison 20,994 59.93 various[e] 7
1832 Andrew Jackson 7,870 24.5 Henry Clay 11,152 34.71 William Wirt 13,106 40.79 7
1828 Andrew Jackson 8,350 25.43 John Quincy Adams 24,363 74.2 - 7

Election of 1824

The election of 1824 was a complex realigning election following the collapse of the prevailing Democratic-Republican Party, resulting in four different candidates each claiming to carry the banner of the party, and competing for influence in different parts of the country. The election was the only one in history to be decided by the House of Representatives under the provisions of the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution after no candidate secured a majority of the electoral vote. It was also the only presidential election in which the candidate who received a plurality of electoral votes (Andrew Jackson) did not become President, a source of great bitterness for Jackson and his supporters, who proclaimed the election of Adams a corrupt bargain.

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
1824 Andrew Jackson no popular vote John Quincy Adams no popular vote Henry Clay no popular vote William H. Crawford no popular vote 7

Elections from 1792 to 1820

In the election of 1820, incumbent President James Monroe ran effectively unopposed, winning all eight of Vermont’s electoral votes, and all electoral votes nationwide except one vote in New Hampshire. To the extent that a popular vote was held, it was primarily directed to filling the office of Vice President.

Year Winner (nationally) Loser (nationally) Electoral
Votes
Notes
1820 James Monroe - 8 Monroe effectively ran unopposed.
1816 James Monroe Rufus King 8
1812 James Madison DeWitt Clinton 8
1808 James Madison Charles C. Pinckney 6
1804 Thomas Jefferson Charles C. Pinckney 6
1800 Thomas Jefferson John Adams 4
1796 John Adams Thomas Jefferson 4
1792 George Washington - 3 Washington effectively ran unopposed.

Notes

  1. ^ William Wirt, 1832; George Washington, 1792.
  2. ^ a b For purposes of these lists, other national candidates are defined as those who won at least one electoral vote, or won at least ten percent of the vote in multiple states.
  3. ^ write-in
  4. ^ Was allied with a slate of unpledged electors in Louisiana, Mississippi and South Carolina
  5. ^ Three other candidates ran and received electoral votes nationally as part of the unsuccessful Whig strategy to defeat Martin Van Buren by running four candidates with local appeal in different regions of the country. The others were Hugh Lawson White, Daniel Webster, and Willie Person Mangum. None of these candidates appeared on the ballot in Vermont.
1792 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1792 United States presidential election in Vermont took place between November 2 and December 5, 1792 as part of the 1792 United States presidential election. The state legislature chose four representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President. However, one would not vote.

Vermont, which had become the 14th state on March 4, 1791, unanimously cast its three electoral votes for incumbent George Washington during its first presidential election.

1796 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1796 United States presidential election in Vermont took place between November 4 and December 7, 1796, as part of the 1796 United States presidential election. The state legislature chose four representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

During this election, Vermont cast four electoral votes for Vice President and New England native John Adams.

1804 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1804 United States presidential election in Vermont took place between November 2 and December 5, 1804, as part of the 1804 United States presidential election. The state legislature chose six representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

During this election, Vermont cast six electoral votes for Democratic Republican incumbent Thomas Jefferson.

1816 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1816 United States presidential election in Vermont took place between November 1 to December 4, 1816, as part of the 1816 United States presidential election. The state legislature chose eight representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

During this election, Vermont cast its eight electoral votes to Democratic Republican candidate and Secretary of State James Monroe.

1828 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1828 United States presidential election in Vermont took place between October 31 and December 2, 1828, as part of the 1828 United States presidential election. Voters chose seven representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

Vermont voted for the National Republican candidate, John Quincy Adams, over the Democratic candidate, Andrew Jackson. Adams won Vermont by a margin of 50.46%.

With 75.23% of the popular vote, Adam's victory in Vermont was his third strongest state in the 1828 election after Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

1832 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1832 United States presidential election in Vermont took place between November 2 and December 5, 1832, as part of the 1832 United States presidential election. Voters chose seven representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

Vermont voted for the Anti-Masonic Party candidate, William Wirt, over the National Republican candidate, Henry Clay, and the Democratic Party candidate, Andrew Jackson. Vermont was the only state in the country that Wirt carried in 1832, by a margin of 6.08 percent. As of 2017, Wirt's performance remains the best-ever by a third-party Presidential candidate in any Northeastern state, constitutes the solitary occasion a third-party candidate has carried any New England state, and the only time a person from Maryland has ever won an electoral vote from pledged electors.

1836 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1836 United States presidential election in Vermont took place between November 3 and December 7, 1836, as part of the 1836 United States presidential election. Voters chose seven representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

Vermont voted for Whig candidate William Henry Harrison over Democratic candidate Martin Van Buren. Harrison won Vermont by a margin of 19.86%.

This would be the final time a Democratic candidate would carry Essex County until Franklin D. Roosevelt won it 104 years later in 1940.

1856 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1856 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 4, 1856, as part of the 1856 United States presidential election. Voters chose five representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Vermont voted for the Republican candidate, John C. Frémont, over the Democratic candidate, James Buchanan, and the Know Nothing candidate, Millard Fillmore. Frémont won the state by a margin of 57.12%.

With 77.96% of the popular vote, Vermont would be his strongest victory in the Union in terms of percentage in the popular vote.Frémont's victory also started the long streak of Republican presidential candidate victories within the Green Mountain State, which wouldn't be broken until 108 years later in 1964.

1860 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1860 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 2, 1860, as part of the 1860 United States presidential election. Voters chose five electors of the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Vermont was won by Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln, who won the state by a 56.45% margin.

With 75.86 percent of the popular vote, Lincoln's victory with in the state would be his strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote.Northern Democratic presidential candidate Stephen A. Douglas was born in Vermont, more specifically in the town of Brandon.

1864 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1864 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 8, 1864, as part of the 1864 United States presidential election. Voters chose five representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Vermont voted for the National Union candidate, Abraham Lincoln, over the Democratic candidate, George B. McClellan. Lincoln won the state by a wide margin of 52.20%.

With 76.10 percent of the popular vote, Lincoln's victory with in the state would be his second strongest victory in the country in terms of percentage in the popular vote after Kansas.

1868 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1868 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 3, 1868, as part of the 1868 United States presidential election. Voters chose five representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Vermont voted for the Republican nominee, Ulysses S. Grant, over the Democratic nominee, Horatio Seymour. Grant won the state by a margin of 57.14%.

With 78.57% of the popular vote, Vermont would be Grant's strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote.

1872 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1872 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 5, 1872. All contemporary 37 states were part of the 1872 United States presidential election. The state voters chose five electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Vermont was won by the Republican nominees, incumbent President Ulysses S. Grant of Illinois and his running mate Senator Henry Wilson of Massachusetts. Grant and Wilson defeated the Liberal Republican and Democratic nominees, former Congressman Horace Greeley of New York and his running mate former Senator and Governor Benjamin Gratz Brown of Missouri by a margin of 57.67%.

With 78.29% of the popular vote, Vermont would be Grant's strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote.

1876 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1876 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 7, 1876, as part of the 1876 United States presidential election. Voters chose 5 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Vermont voted for the Republican nominee, Rutherford B. Hayes, over the Democratic nominee, Samuel J. Tilden. Hayes won Vermont by a margin of 36.92%.

With 68.30% of the popular vote, Vermont would be Hayes' strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote.

1880 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1880 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 2, 1880, as part of the 1880 United States presidential election. Voters chose five representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Vermont voted for the Republican nominee, James A. Garfield, over the Democratic nominee, Winfield Scott Hancock. Garfield won Vermont by a margin of 41.66 percentage points.

With 69.81 percent of the popular vote, Vermont would be Garfield's strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote.Vice President-elect Chester Alan Arthur was born in Vermont, more specifically in the town of Fairfield.

1884 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1884 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 4, 1884, as part of the 1884 United States presidential election. Voters chose four representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Vermont voted for the Republican nominee, James G. Blaine, over the Democratic nominee, Grover Cleveland. Blaine won the Green Mountain State by a margin of 37.34 percentage points.

With 66.52 percent of the popular vote, Vermont would be Blaine’s strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote.

1892 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1892 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 8, 1892, as part of the 1892 United States presidential election. Voters chose four representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Vermont voted for the Republican nominee, incumbent President Benjamin Harrison, over the Democratic nominee, former President Grover Cleveland, who was running for a second, non-consecutive term. Harrison won Vermont by a margin of 38.83%.

With 68.09% of the popular vote, Vermont would be Harrison's strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote.

1904 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1904 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 8, 1904. Voters chose four representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Vermont overwhelmingly voted for the Republican nominee, President Theodore Roosevelt, over the Democratic nominee, former Chief Judge of New York Court of Appeals Alton B. Parker. Roosevelt won Vermont by a landslide margin of 59.13 percentage points.

With 77.97 percent of the popular vote, Vermont would be Roosevelt’s strongest victory in terms of percentage of the popular vote.

1908 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 1908 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 3, 1908. Voters chose four representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Vermont overwhelmingly voted for the Republican nominee, Secretary of War William Howard Taft, over the Democratic nominee, former U.S. Representative William Jennings Bryan. Taft won Vermont by a landslide margin of 53.26 percentage points.

With 75.08 percent of the popular vote, Vermont would be Taft’s strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote.

2020 United States presidential election in Vermont

The 2020 United States presidential election in Vermont is scheduled to take place on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States presidential election in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia will participate. Vermont voters will choose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote. The state of Vermont has 3 electoral votes in the Electoral College.As of April 2019, Donald Trump and Bill Weld are the declared Republican candidates.

Bernie Sanders, one of the two current senators from Vermont and a 2016 Democratic primary candidate, declared his candidacy on 19 February 2019, after speculation he would do so. A number of other Democrats are running or have expressed interest in running, and Joe Biden, Tulsi Gabbard, Elizabeth Warren, Amy Klobuchar, Kamala Harris, and Cory Booker are among the major declared candidates.

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