United States presidential elections in Texas

Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Texas, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1845, Texas has participated in every U.S. presidential election except the election of 1864 during the American Civil War, when the state had seceded to join the Confederacy, and the election of 1868, when the state was undergoing Reconstruction.

In its first century Texas was a Democratic bastion, only voting for another party once – in 1928 when anti-Catholic sentiment against Al Smith drove voters to Republican Herbert Hoover. A gradual trend towards increasing social liberalism in the Democratic Party, however, has turned the state (apart from Hispanic South Texas, the Trans-Pecos and several large cities) into a Republican stronghold. Since 1980 Texas has voted Republican in every election.

Winners of the state are in bold.

Presidential elections in Texas
Map of the United States with Texas highlighted
No. of elections41
Voted Democratic27
Voted Republican14
Voted other0
Voted for winning candidate25
Voted for losing candidate16

Elections from 1864 to present

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Other national
candidates[a]
Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
Notes
2016 Donald Trump 4,685,047 52.10 Hillary Clinton 3,877,868 43.12 - 38 Two faithless electors, one voting for John Kasich, the other for Ron Paul.
2012 Barack Obama 3,308,124 41.38 Mitt Romney 4,569,843 57.17 - 38
2008 Barack Obama 3,528,633 43.68 John McCain 4,479,328 55.45 - 34
2004 George W. Bush 4,526,917 61.09 John Kerry 2,832,704 38.22 - 34
2000 George W. Bush 3,799,639 59.30 Al Gore 2,433,746 37.98 - 32
1996 Bill Clinton 2,459,683 43.83 Bob Dole 2,736,167 48.76 Ross Perot 378,537 6.75 32
1992 Bill Clinton 2,281,815 37.08 George H. W. Bush 2,496,071 40.56 Ross Perot 1,354,781 22.01 32
1988 George H. W. Bush 3,036,829 55.95 Michael Dukakis 2,352,748 43.35 - 29
1984 Ronald Reagan 3,433,428 63.61 Walter Mondale 1,949,276 36.11 - 29
1980 Ronald Reagan 2,510,705 55.28 Jimmy Carter 1,881,147 41.42 John B. Anderson 111,613 2.46 26
1976 Jimmy Carter 2,082,319 51.14 Gerald Ford 1,953,300 47.97 - 26
1972 Richard Nixon 2,298,896 66.20 George McGovern 1,154,291 33.24 - 26
1968 Richard Nixon 1,227,844 39.87 Hubert Humphrey 1,266,804 41.14 George Wallace 584,269 18.97 25
1964 Lyndon B. Johnson 1,663,185 63.32 Barry Goldwater 958,566 36.49 - 25
1960 John F. Kennedy 1,167,567 50.52 Richard Nixon 1,121,310 48.52 - 24
1956 Dwight D. Eisenhower 1,080,619 55.26 Adlai Stevenson II 859,958 43.98 T. Coleman Andrews/
Unpledged Electors[b]
14,591 0.75 24
1952 Dwight D. Eisenhower 1,102,878 53.13 Adlai Stevenson II 969,228 46.69 - 24
1948 Harry S. Truman 824,235 65.96 Thomas E. Dewey 303,467 24.29 Strom Thurmond 113,776 9.11 23
1944 Franklin D. Roosevelt 821,605 71.42 Thomas E. Dewey 191,425 16.64 - 23
1940 Franklin D. Roosevelt 909,974 80.92 Wendell Willkie 212,692 18.91 - 23
1936 Franklin D. Roosevelt 734,485 87.08 Alf Landon 103,874 12.31 - 23
1932 Franklin D. Roosevelt 760,348 88.06 Herbert Hoover 97,959 11.35 - 23
1928 Herbert Hoover 367,036 51.77 Al Smith 341,032 48.10 - 20
1924 Calvin Coolidge 130,023 19.78 John W. Davis 484,605 73.70 Robert M. La Follette Sr. 42,881 6.52 20
1920 Warren G. Harding 114,538 23.54 James M. Cox 288,767 59.34 - 20
1916 Woodrow Wilson 286,514 76.92 Charles E. Hughes 64,999 17.45 - 20
1912 Woodrow Wilson 221,589 72.62 Theodore Roosevelt 28,853 9.46 William H. Taft 26,755 8.77 20
1908 William H. Taft 65,666 22.35 William Jennings Bryan 217,302 73.97 - 18
1904 Theodore Roosevelt 51,242 21.9 Alton B. Parker 167,200 71.45 - 18
1900 William McKinley 130,641 30.83 William Jennings Bryan 267,432 63.12 - 15
1896 William McKinley 167,520 30.75 William Jennings Bryan 370,434 68.00 - 15
1892 Grover Cleveland 239,148 56.65 Benjamin Harrison 81,144 19.22 James B. Weaver 99,688 23.61 15
1888 Benjamin Harrison 88,422 24.73 Grover Cleveland 234,883 65.7 - 13
1884 Grover Cleveland 225,309 69.26 James G. Blaine 93,141 28.63 - 13
1880 James A. Garfield 57,893 23.95 Winfield S. Hancock 156,428 64.71 James B. Weaver 27,405 11.34 8
1876 Rutherford B. Hayes 44,800 29.96 Samuel J. Tilden 104,755 70.04 - 8
1872 Ulysses S. Grant 47,468 40.71 Horace Greeley 66,546 57.07 - 8
1868 Ulysses S. Grant No vote due to status of Reconstruction. Horatio Seymour -
1864 Abraham Lincoln No vote due to secession. George B. McClellan -

Election of 1860

The election of 1860 was a complex realigning election in which the breakdown of the previous two-party alignment culminated in four parties each competing for influence in different parts of the country. The result of the election, with the victory of an ardent opponent of slavery, spurred the secession of eleven states and brought about the American Civil War.

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
1860 Abraham Lincoln no ballots Stephen A. Douglas 18 0.0 John C. Breckinridge 47,454 75.5 John Bell 15,383 24.5 4

Elections prior to 1860

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Other national
candidates[a]
Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
Notes
1856 James Buchanan 31,169 66.59 John C. Frémont no ballots Millard Fillmore 15,639 33.41 4
1852 Franklin Pierce 13,552 73.07 Winfield Scott 4,995 26.93 John P. Hale no ballots 4
1848 Zachary Taylor 4,509 29.71 Lewis Cass 10,668 70.29 Martin Van Buren no ballots 4

Notes

  1. ^ a b For purposes of these lists, other national candidates are defined as those who won at least one electoral vote, or won at least ten percent of the vote in multiple states.
  2. ^ Was allied with a slate of unpledged electors in Louisiana, Mississippi and South Carolina
1848 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1848 United States presidential election in Texas was held on November 7, 1848. Texas voters chose 4 electors to represent the state in the Electoral College, which chose the president and vice president. Texas was annexed by the United States on February 19, 1846, making this the first presidential election in which the state participated.

Texas overwhelmingly voted for the Democratic nominee Lewis Cass, who received 70.2% of the vote. Texas was, by far, Cass's strongest state, and the only state where he received over 70.2% of the popular vote.

1852 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1852 United States presidential election in Texas was held on November 2, 1852. Texas voters chose 4 electors to represent the state in the Electoral College, which chose the president and vice president.

Texas voted for the Democratic nominee Franklin Pierce, who received 73.068% of Texas's votes. Texas was Pierce's strongest state by about 9% (Georgia was 2nd with 62.7% of the vote from the state).

1856 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1856 United States presidential election in Texas was held in November 4, 1856. Texas voters chose 4 electors to represent the state in the Electoral College, which chose the president and vice president.

Texas voted for the Democratic nominee James Buchanan, who received 67% of the vote. Texas was Buchanan's second strongest state.

Republican Party nominee John C. Frémont was not on the ballot.

1860 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1860 United States presidential election in Texas was held on November 6, 1860. Texas voters chose four electors to represent the state in the Electoral College, which chose the president and vice president.

Texas voted for the Southern Democratic nominee John C. Breckinridge, who received 75% of the vote. Texas was Breckinridge's strongest state.

Republican Party candidate Abraham Lincoln was not on the ballot in Texas; neither was "Northern Democrat" Stephen A. Douglas, although Douglas did gain 18 votes as a write-in candidate. Douglas supporters had agreed to transfer their allegiance to Constitutional Union candidate John Bell, but Bell carried only three counties in the state and it is sometimes thought that the German-American abolitionists in such counties as Gillespie refrained from visiting the polls.

1872 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1872 United States presidential election in Texas was held on November 5, 1872. Texas voters chose 8 electors to represent the state in the Electoral College, which chose the president and vice president.

Texas voted for the Liberal Republican nominee Horace Greeley, who received 57% of the vote. Greeley died before Congress could certify the results, leaving Texas electors (and the electors of five other states) free to vote for whoever they chose. All 8 electors voted for Thomas A. Hendricks.

1876 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1876 United States presidential election in Texas was held on November 7, 1876. Texas voters chose 8 electors to represent the state in the Electoral College, which chose the president and vice president.

Texas overwhelmingly voted for the Democratic nominee, Governor Samuel J. Tilden of New York, who received 70% of the vote. Texas was Tilden's second-strongest state.

1880 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1880 United States presidential election in Texas was held on November 2, 1880. Texas voters chose 8 electors to represent the state in the Electoral College, which chose the president and vice president.

Texas voted for the Democratic nominee Winfield S. Hancock, who received 64% of the vote. Texas was Hancock's fourth-strongest state. It was also the strongest state for Greenback candidate James B. Weaver, who received 11.34% of the vote.

1884 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1884 United States presidential election in Texas was held on November 4, 1884. Texas voters chose 13 electors to represent the state in the Electoral College, which chose the president and vice president.

Texas voted for the Democratic nominee Grover Cleveland, who received 69% of the vote. Texas was Cleveland's second strongest state.

1888 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1888 United States presidential election in Texas took place on November 6, 1888, as part of the 1888 United States presidential election. Texas voters chose thirteen representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.Texas was won by the incumbent President Grover Cleveland (D–New York), running with the former Senator and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Ohio Allen G. Thurman, with 65.70% of the popular vote, against former Senator Benjamin Harrison (R-Indiana), running with Levi P. Morton, the 31st governor of New York, with 24.73% of the vote and former Illinois state representative Alson Streeter (L–Illinois), running with Charles E. Cunningham, with 8.24% of the vote.The Prohibition Party ran brigadier general Clinton B. Fisk and John A. Brooks and received 1.33% of the vote.

1892 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1892 United States presidential election in Texas took place on November 8, 1892. All contemporary 44 states were part of the 1892 United States presidential election. Texas voters chose fifteen electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Texas was won by the Democratic nominees, Grover Cleveland of New York and his running mate Adlai Stevenson I of Illinois.

Although Harrison received less than 20 percent of the statewide vote, as of the 2016 presidential election, this is the last time Starr County has voted for a Republican Presidential candidate, the longest unbroken Democratic voting streak in the country.

1896 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1896 United States presidential election in Texas took place on November 3, 1896. All contemporary 45 states were part of the 1896 United States presidential election. Texas voters chose fifteen electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Texas was won by the Democratic nominees, former U.S. Representative William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska and his running mate Arthur Sewall of Maine. Four electors cast their Vice Presidential ballots for Thomas E. Watson.

1900 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1900 United States presidential election in Texas took place on November 6, 1900. All contemporary 45 states were part of the 1900 United States presidential election. Texas voters chose fifteen electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Texas was won by the Democratic nominees, former U.S. Representative William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska and his running mate Adlai Stevenson I of Illinois.

1904 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1904 United States presidential election in Texas took place on November 8, 1904. All contemporary 45 states were part of the 1904 United States presidential election. Texas voters chose eighteen electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Texas was won by the Democratic nominees, Chief Judge Alton B. Parker of New York and his running mate Henry G. Davis of West Virginia.

1912 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1912 United States presidential election in Texas took place on November 5, 1912, as part of the 1912 United States presidential election. Texas voters chose twenty representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Texas was won by Princeton University President Woodrow Wilson (D–Virginia), running with governor of Indiana Thomas R. Marshall, with 72.73% of the popular vote, against the 27th president of the United States William Howard Taft (R–Ohio), running with Columbia University President Nicholas Murray Butler, with 9.45% of the popular vote, the 26th president of the United States Theodore Roosevelt (P–New York), running with governor of California Hiram Johnson, with 8.86% of the popular vote and the five-time candidate of the Socialist Party of America for President of the United States Eugene V. Debs (S–Indiana), running with the first Socialist mayor of a major city in the United States Emil Seidel, with 8.25% of the popular vote. As of the 2016 presidential election, this is the last election in which Webb County voted Republican.

1936 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1936 United States presidential election in Texas took place on November 3, 1936, as part of the 1936 United States presidential election. Texas voters chose twenty-three representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Texas was won by incumbent President Franklin D. Roosevelt (D–New York), running with Vice President John Nance Garner, with 87.08% of the popular vote, against Governor Alf Landon (R–Kansas), running with Frank Knox, with 12.32% of the popular vote.By percentage of the popular vote won, Texas was Roosevelt's fifth-best state, behind South Carolina, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Georgia.

1940 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1940 United States presidential election in Texas took place on November 5, 1940, as part of the 1940 United States presidential election. Texas voters chose twenty-three representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Texas was won by incumbent President Franklin D. Roosevelt (D–New York), running with Secretary Henry A. Wallace, with 80.92% of the popular vote, against Wendell Willkie (R–Indiana), running with Minority Leader Charles L. McNary, with 18.91% of the popular vote.

1944 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1944 United States presidential election in Texas took place on November 7, 1944, as part of the 1944 United States presidential election. Texas voters chose 23 electors who voted for president and vice president. Texas was won by then president Franklin D. Roosevelt over Thomas Dewey by a landslide margin of 54.78% with the 3rd party Texas Regulars winning 11% of the vote and Washington County the only county in the nation to go for a third party that election.

1952 United States presidential election in Texas

The 1952 United States presidential election in Texas was held on November 4, 1952. It was part of the 1952 United States Presidential Election held throughout all contemporary forty-eight states. Voters chose twenty-four representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

The Republican Party candidate, former General of the Army and Supreme Allied Commander Europe Dwight D. Eisenhower, won his birth state Texas with 53 percent of the vote against Illinois Governor Adlai Stevenson, carrying the state’s 24 electoral votes. Despite losing most southern and eastern areas of the state to Stevenson, Eisenhower managed to carry Texas by a margin of 6.44 points. Eisenhower's victory in the state made him only the second Republican to carry the state during a presidential election, with the first Republican candidate being Herbert Hoover back in 1928, along with being the first presidential candidate to win over a million votes in Texas. Eisenhower nonetheless did lose Grayson County, the home of his birthplace, Denison.

2020 United States presidential election in Texas

The 2020 United States presidential election in Texas is scheduled to take place on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States elections in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia will participate. Texas voters will choose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote. The state of Texas has 38 electoral votes in the Electoral College.As of April 2019, Donald Trump and Bill Weld are declared Republican candidates. Texas Governor Greg Abbott declined to run against Trump, as did 2016 Republican primary candidate and current senator Ted Cruz.A number of Democrats are running or have expressed interest in running, and Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, and former Texas congressman and senatorial candidate, Beto O'Rourke are among the major declared candidates.

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