United States presidential elections in Minnesota

Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Minnesota, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1858, Minnesota has participated in every U.S. presidential election.

Winners of the state are in bold.

Presidential elections in Minnesota
Map of the United States with Minnesota highlighted
No. of elections40
Voted Democratic20
Voted Republican19
Voted other1[a]
Voted for winning candidate27
Voted for losing candidate13

Elections from 1864 to present

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Other national
candidates[b]
Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
Notes
2016 Donald Trump 1,323,232 44.93 Hillary Clinton 1,367,825 46.44 - 10
2012 Barack Obama 1,546,167 52.65 Mitt Romney 1,320,225 44.96 - 10
2008 Barack Obama 1,573,354 54.06 John McCain 1,275,409 43.82 - 10
2004 George W. Bush 1,346,695 47.61 John Kerry 1,445,014 51.09 - 10 electoral vote split: 9 to Kerry, 1 to Edwards (faithless elector)
2000 George W. Bush 1,109,659 45.50 Al Gore 1,168,266 47.91 - 10
1996 Bill Clinton 1,120,438 51.10 Bob Dole 766,476 34.96 Ross Perot 257,704 11.75 10
1992 Bill Clinton 1,020,997 43.48 George H. W. Bush 747,841 31.85 Ross Perot 562,506 23.96 10
1988 George H. W. Bush 962,337 45.90 Michael Dukakis 1,109,471 52.91 - 10
1984 Ronald Reagan 1,032,603 49.54 Walter Mondale 1,036,364 49.72 - 10
1980 Ronald Reagan 873,241 42.56 Jimmy Carter 954,174 46.50 John B. Anderson 174,990 8.53 10
1976 Jimmy Carter 1,070,440 54.90 Gerald Ford 819,395 42.02 - 10
1972 Richard Nixon 898,269 51.58 George McGovern 802,346 46.07 - 10
1968 Richard Nixon 658,643 41.46 Hubert Humphrey 857,738 54.00 George Wallace 68,931 4.34 10
1964 Lyndon B. Johnson 991,117 63.76 Barry Goldwater 559,624 36.00 - 10
1960 John F. Kennedy 779,933 50.58 Richard Nixon 757,915 49.16 - 11
1956 Dwight D. Eisenhower 719,302 53.68 Adlai Stevenson II 617,525 46.08 T. Coleman Andrews/
Unpledged Electors[c]
- 11
1952 Dwight D. Eisenhower 763,211 55.33 Adlai Stevenson II 608,458 44.11 - 11
1948 Harry S. Truman 692,966 57.16 Thomas E. Dewey 483,617 39.89 Strom Thurmond - 11
1944 Franklin D. Roosevelt 589,864 52.41 Thomas E. Dewey 527,416 46.86 - 11
1940 Franklin D. Roosevelt 644,196 51.49 Wendell Willkie 596,274 47.66 - 11
1936 Franklin D. Roosevelt 698,811 61.84 Alf Landon 350,461 31.01 - 11
1932 Franklin D. Roosevelt 600,806 59.91 Herbert Hoover 363,959 36.29 - 11
1928 Herbert Hoover 560,977 57.77 Al Smith 396,451 40.83 - 12
1924 Calvin Coolidge 420,759 51.18 John W. Davis 55,913 6.80 Robert M. La Follette Sr. 339,192 41.26 12
1920 Warren G. Harding 519,421 70.59 James M. Cox 142,994 19.43 - 12
1916 Woodrow Wilson 179,152 46.25 Charles E. Hughes 179,544 46.35 - 12
1912 Woodrow Wilson 106,426 31.84 Theodore Roosevelt 125,856 37.66 William H. Taft 64,334 19.25 12
1908 William H. Taft 195,843 59.11 William Jennings Bryan 109,401 33.02 - 11
1904 Theodore Roosevelt 216,651 73.98 Alton B. Parker 55,187 18.84 - 11
1900 William McKinley 190,461 60.21 William Jennings Bryan 112,901 35.69 - 9
1896 William McKinley 193,503 56.62 William Jennings Bryan 139,735 40.89 - 9
1892 Grover Cleveland 100,920 37.76 Benjamin Harrison 122,823 45.96 James B. Weaver 29,313 10.97 9
1888 Benjamin Harrison 142,492 54.12 Grover Cleveland 104,385 39.65 - 7
1884 Grover Cleveland 70,065 36.87 James G. Blaine 111,685 58.78 - 7
1880 James A. Garfield 93,902 62.28 Winfield S. Hancock 53,315 35.36 James B. Weaver 3,267 2.17 5
1876 Rutherford B. Hayes 72,955 58.80 Samuel J. Tilden 48,587 39.16 - 5
1872 Ulysses S. Grant 55,708 61.27 Horace Greeley 35,211 38.73 - 5
1868 Ulysses S. Grant 43,545 60.8 Horatio Seymour 28,075 39.2 - 4
1864 Abraham Lincoln 25,031 59.0 George B. McClellan 17,376 41.0 - 4

Election of 1860

The election of 1860 was a complex realigning election in which the breakdown of the previous two-party alignment culminated in four parties each competing for influence in different parts of the country. The result of the election, with the victory of an ardent opponent of slavery, spurred the secession of eleven states and brought about the American Civil War.

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
1860 Abraham Lincoln 22,069 63.4 Stephen A. Douglas 11,920 34.3 John C. Breckinridge 748 2.2 John Bell 50 0.1 4

Notes

  1. ^ Theodore Roosevelt, 1912.
  2. ^ For purposes of these lists, other national candidates are defined as those who won at least one electoral vote, or won at least ten percent of the vote in multiple states.
  3. ^ Was allied with a slate of unpledged electors in Louisiana, Mississippi and South Carolina

See also

1860 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1860 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 6, 1860, as part of the 1860 United States presidential election. Minnesota voters chose four representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Minnesota was won by Illinois Representative Abraham Lincoln (Republican Party (United States)), running with Senator Hannibal Hamlin, with 57.23% of the popular vote, against Senator Stephen A. Douglas (D–Vermont), running with 41st Governor of Georgia Herschel V. Johnson, with 43.97% of the popular vote.

With 63.53 percent of the popular vote, Lincoln's victory within the state would be his second strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote in the 1860 election after Vermont.

1864 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1864 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 8, 1864, as part of the 1864 United States presidential election. Minnesota voters chose four representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.Minnesota was won by the incumbent President Abraham Lincoln (R-Illinois), running with former Senator and Military Governor of Tennessee Andrew Johnson, with 59.06% of the popular vote, against the 4th Commanding General of the United States Army George B. McClellan (D–Pennsylvania), running with Representative George H. Pendleton, with 40.94% of the vote.

1868 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1868 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 3, 1868, as part of the 1868 United States presidential election. Minnesota voters chose four representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.Minnesota was won by Ulysses S. Grant, formerly the 6th Commanding General of the United States Army (R-Ohio), running with Speaker of the House Schuyler Colfax, with 60.88% of the popular vote, against the 18th governor of New York, Horatio Seymour (D–New York), running with former Senator Francis Preston Blair, Jr., with 39.12% of the vote.

1872 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1872 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 5, 1872, as part of the 1872 United States presidential election. Voters chose five representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Minnesota voted for the Republican candidate, Ulysses S. Grant, over Liberal Republican candidate, Horace Greeley. Grant won Minnesota by a margin of 22.54%.

1880 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1880 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 2, 1880, as part of the 1880 United States presidential election. Voters chose five representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Minnesota voted for the Republican nominee, James A. Garfield, over the Democratic nominee, Winfield Scott Hancock. Garfield won the state by a margin of 30.25%.

With 62.28% of the popular vote, Minnesota would be Garfield's third strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote after Vermont and Nebraska.

1884 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1884 Presidential Election held in Minnesota took place on November 4, 1884, as part of the 1884 United States presidential election. Voters chose seven representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Minnesota was won by Republican nominee, James G. Blaine, over the Democratic nominee, Grover Cleveland. Blaine won the state by a margin of 21.91%.

With 58.78% of the popular vote, Minnesota would prove to be Blaine's second strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote after Vermont.

1892 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1892 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 8, 1892. All contemporary 44 states were part of the 1892 United States presidential election. Minnesota voters chose nine electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Minnesota was won by the Republican nominees, incumbent President Benjamin Harrison of Indiana and his running mate Whitelaw Reid of New York. Minnesota was the state where Bidwell performed the best and the only one where he broke 5%.

1896 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1896 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 3, 1896. All contemporary 45 states were part of the 1896 United States presidential election. Minnesota voters chose nine electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Minnesota was won by the Republican nominees, former Ohio Governor William McKinley and his running mate Garret Hobart of New Jersey.

1900 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1900 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 6, 1900. All contemporary 45 states were part of the 1900 United States presidential election. Minnesota voters chose nine electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Minnesota was won by the Republican nominees, incumbent President William McKinley of Ohio and his running mate Theodore Roosevelt of New York. The ticket won the state by a margin of 24.52 percent.

With 60.21% of the popular vote, Minnesota would be McKinley's fifth strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote after Vermont, North Dakota, Maine and Pennsylvania.

1904 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1904 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 8, 1904. All contemporary 45 states were part of the 1904 United States presidential election. Minnesota voters chose eleven electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Minnesota was won by the Republican nominees, incumbent President Theodore Roosevelt of New York and his running mate Charles W. Fairbanks of Indiana. The ticket won the state by a margin of 55.14 percent.

With 73.98% of the popular vote, Minnesota would be Roosevelt's third strongest victory in terms of percentage in the popular vote after Vermont and North Dakota.

1944 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1944 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 7, 1944, in Minnesota as part of the 1944 United States presidential election.

The Democratic candidate, incumbent President Franklin D. Roosevelt won the state over New York governor Thomas E. Dewey by a margin of 62,448 votes, or 5.55%. Nationally, Roosevelt was re-elected to an unprecedented fourth term as president, with 432 electoral votes and a comfortable 7.5% lead over Dewey in the popular vote. However, Roosevelt would not serve the entirety of his fourth term, as he died within a half-year after winning his final election.

Roosevelt was the only president of the United States who was elected to more than two quadrennial terms. The 22nd Amendment, ratified on February 27, 1951, ensures that Roosevelt will continue to hold this record indefinitely, as the said amendment prohibits any person from serving more than two and a half terms as president.

1960 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1960 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 8, 1960, in Minnesota as part of the 1960 United States presidential election.

The Democratic Party candidate U.S. Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts won the state over incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon by a margin of 22,018 votes, or 1.42%. Kennedy went on to win the election nationally, but by the closest margin since Woodrow Wilson's re-election in 1916. This was the last presidential election held in Minnesota before the elimination of the 9th congressional district in 1963.

1972 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1972 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 7, 1972, in Minnesota as part of the 1972 United States presidential election.

The Republican Party candidate, incumbent President Richard Nixon, won the state over U.S. Senator George McGovern of South Dakota by a margin of 95,923 votes, or 5.51%, the closest state in the election. Nixon went on to win the election nationally, by a landslide margin of 23.15% of the popular vote. McGovern carried only Massachusetts and the District of Columbia.

The 1972 election was the last time Minnesota—historically a state which favored Democrats—was carried by a Republican. During Nixon's second term as President, the Watergate scandal resulted in the loss of the Republican Party's credibility both nationally and in Minnesota. The damage caused by Watergate was so pronounced that the Republican Party of Minnesota was forced to rebrand itself as the "Independent-Republican Party" from 1975 to 1995, in order to distance itself from the national Republican Party.

Nixon also remains the last Republican to carry heavily populated Hennepin County, with 1972 also the last time that county did not vote the same as neighboring Ramsey County.

Although Republicans have not won Minnesota's electoral votes since, they have come extremely close in the 1984 and 2016 United States Presidential Elections.

1976 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1976 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 2, 1976, in Minnesota as part of the 1976 United States presidential election.

The Democratic Party candidate, former Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter, won the state over incumbent President Gerald Ford by a landslide margin of 251,045 votes, or approximately 12.88%. Carter went on to win the election nationally, as the country's confidence in the Republican Party had been deeply shaken following the Watergate scandal and the subsequent resignation of Richard Nixon.

Prior to the election, Minnesota was considered as leaning-Carter. The Republican Party of Minnesota had been terribly weakened by the Watergate scandal. That weakened position was further eroded when Jimmy Carter chose Minnesota senator Walter Mondale as his vice-presidential running mate, securing the state for Carter. Mondale later went on to become the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1984, in which he only won one state, Minnesota. The effect of Watergate on the political landscape in Minnesota can be clearly seen in the results of this election, as well as the landslide DFL victory in the 1974 gubernatorial election. Previously a state which, having cast its electoral votes for the Republican nominee in 20 of the 29 presidential elections from 1860 to 1972, favored Republicans.

As of the 2016 presidential election, Minnesota has not cast a single electoral vote in favor of a Republican since 1972, and no other state has come close to this Democratic-voting streak. As of the 2016 presidential election, this is the last election in which Roseau County, Wilkin County, Douglas County, Wadena County, and Pipestone County voted for the Democratic candidate.

1980 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1980 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 4, 1980, in Minnesota as part of the 1980 United States presidential election.

The Democratic Party candidate, incumbent President Jimmy Carter, won the state over former California Governor Ronald Reagan by 80,933 votes, giving him one of just seven victories in the election (other than Minnesota, Carter also carried Maryland, West Virginia, Hawaii, Rhode Island, the District of Columbia and his home state of Georgia).

Nationally, Reagan won the election with 489 electoral votes and 50.75% of the popular vote. Minnesota was the only state not to back Reagan in either of his presidential campaigns, casting its electoral votes in favor of Walter Mondale in 1984.

1984 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1984 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 6, 1984, in Minnesota as part of the 1984 United States presidential election.

The Democratic Party candidate, former Vice President Walter Mondale, narrowly won his home state over incumbent President Ronald Reagan by just 3,761 votes, giving him his only state victory in the election (Mondale also carried the District of Columbia), resulting in the state weighing in at around 18% more Democratic than the nation at large. Minnesota was the only state not to back Reagan in either of his presidential campaigns.

Since all 49 other states went to the Republican Party in 1984, this established Minnesota's status as the state with the longest streak of voting Democratic. As of the 2016 presidential election, it still has not voted for a Republican presidential candidate since 1972. However, the District of Columbia has voted Democratic in all presidential elections since 1964 when it was first granted the right to vote for president.

1988 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1988 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 8, 1988, as part of the 1988 United States presidential election. Voters chose ten representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Minnesota was won by Democrat Michael Dukakis, Governor of Massachusetts, with 52.91% of the popular vote over Republican Vice President George H.W. Bush's 45.90%, a victory margin of 7.01%. Four years earlier Minnesota had been the only state in the entire country to vote for Democrat Walter Mondale over Republican Ronald Reagan, and this Democratic strength in the state endured in 1988, as Minnesota chose Michael Dukakis by a comfortable margin despite George H.W. Bush winning a convincing victory nationwide. Minnesota has the longest streak of voting Democratic of any state, having not voted Republican since 1972.

1992 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 1992 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 3, 1992, as part of the 1992 United States presidential election. Voters chose ten representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Minnesota was won by Governor Bill Clinton (D-Arkansas) with 43.48% of the popular vote over incumbent President George H.W. Bush (R-Texas) who took 31.85%, a victory margin of 11.63%. Businessman Ross Perot (I-Texas) finished in third, with 23.96% of the popular vote. Clinton ultimately won the national vote, defeating incumbent President Bush.April 7, 1992, saw the first presidential primary in Minnesota since 1956. Clinton won a plurality of votes in the DFL primary and Bush won in the IR election.

2020 United States presidential election in Minnesota

The 2020 United States presidential election in Minnesota is scheduled to take place on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States elections in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia will participate. Minnesota voters will choose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote. The state of Minnesota has 10 electoral votes in the Electoral College.As of May 2019, Donald Trump and Bill Weld are the declared Republican candidates. A number of Democrats are running or have expressed interest in running, and Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, Beto O’Rourke, and former Vice President Joe Biden are among the major declared candidates. Additionally, Kirsten Gillibrand has formed an exploratory committee.Amy Klobuchar, U.S. Senator from Minnesota since 2007, expressed interest in running, and formally declared her candidacy in February 2019.

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