United States presidential elections in Hawaii

Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Hawaii, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1959, Hawaii has participated in every U.S. presidential election.

Winners of the state are in bold.

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Other national
candidates[1]
Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
Notes
2016 Donald Trump 128,847 30.04 Hillary Clinton 266,891 62.22 - 4 One faithless elector voted for Bernie Sanders.
2012 Barack Obama 306,658 70.55 Mitt Romney 121,015 27.84 - 4
2008 Barack Obama 325,871 71.85 John McCain 120,566 26.58 - 4
2004 George W. Bush 194,191 45.26 John Kerry 231,708 54.01 - 4
2000 George W. Bush 137,845 37.46 Al Gore 205,286 55.79 - 4
1996 Bill Clinton 205,012 56.93 Bob Dole 113,943 31.64 Ross Perot 27,358 7.6 4
1992 Bill Clinton 179,310 48.09 George H. W. Bush 136,822 36.7 Ross Perot 53,003 14.22 4
1988 George H. W. Bush 158,625 44.75 Michael Dukakis 192,364 54.27 - 4
1984 Ronald Reagan 185,050 55.1 Walter Mondale 147,154 43.82 - 4
1980 Ronald Reagan 130,112 42.9 Jimmy Carter 135,879 44.8 John B. Anderson 32,021 10.56 4
1976 Jimmy Carter 147,375 50.59 Gerald Ford 140,003 48.06 - 4
1972 Richard Nixon 168,865 62.48 George McGovern 101,409 37.52 - 4
1968 Richard Nixon 91,425 38.7 Hubert Humphrey 141,324 59.83 George Wallace 3,469 1.47 4
1964 Lyndon B. Johnson 163,249 78.76 Barry Goldwater 44,022 21.24 - 4
1960 John F. Kennedy 92,410 50.03 Richard Nixon 92,295 49.97 - 3
Presidential elections in Hawaii
Map of the United States with Hawaii highlighted
No. of elections15
Voted Democratic13
Voted Republican2
Voted other0
Voted for winning candidate9
Voted for losing candidate6

References

  1. ^ For purposes of these lists, other national candidates are defined as those who won at least one electoral vote, or won at least ten percent of the vote in multiple states.
1960 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 1960 presidential election in Hawaii was held on November 8, 1960, as part of the 1960 United States presidential election. This was the first presidential election in which Hawaii participated; the state had been admitted to the Union just over a year earlier. The islands favored Democrat John F. Kennedy by the narrowest of margins: 115 votes, or 0.06%.

Initially it appeared Republican candidate Richard Nixon had won in the state, as he was 141 votes ahead after the first count. A court-ordered recount was still underway when Hawaii's Republican governor signed the certificate from the GOP electors giving the state's three electoral votes to Nixon. On the same day, the Democratic electors also issued a certificate awarding the votes to Kennedy. The final recount showed Kennedy had actually prevailed, forcing the governor to sign the second certificate from the Democratic electors. Both certificates had arrived in Washington by the time Congress convened in January 1961, with then-Vice President Nixon charged with presiding over a joint session to certify his own election loss. Hearing no objections, Nixon ordered the Democratic certificate counted and ignored the accompanying Republican certificate, even though it also bore the governor's signature as required by federal law. This to date is the closest that Hawaii has ever came to voting Republican in a close election, along with voting for a non sitting Republican presidential candidate as well.

1964 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 1964 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 7, 1964. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1964 United States presidential election. Hawaii voters chose 4 electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president of the United States.

Hawaii was won by incumbent United States President Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas, who was running against Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona. Johnson ran for a second time with Senator Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota, and Goldwater ran with U.S. Representative William E. Miller of New York.

1968 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 1968 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 5, 1968. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1968 United States presidential election. Hawaii voters chose 4 electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Hawaii overwhelmingly voted for the Democratic Party nominee Vice President Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota with Edmund Muskie against Republican Party candidate, former Vice President Richard Nixon of New York with Spiro Agnew. Hawaii weighed in for this election as 22% more Democratic than the national average, with Humphrey winning the state by a 21% margin.

Hawaii would prove to be the weakest state for the American Independent Party candidate, former Alabama governor George Wallace, who won 3,469 votes, amounting to a total of 1.47%. Being the only state in the country to have a plurality of non-white residents, mainly Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Wallace's strong segregationist views failed to make any significant impact on the state's electorate, especially since he was far beyond his base of support in the Deep South.

1972 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 1972 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 7, 1972. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1972 United States presidential election. Hawaii voters chose 4 electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Hawaii was won by incumbent United States President Richard Nixon of California, who was running against former Senator George McGovern of South Dakota. Nixon ran for a second time with former Governor Spiro Agnew of Maryland, and McGovern ran with former U.S. Ambassador to France Sargent Shriver of Maryland.

Nixon won the election in Hawaii with a decisive 25-point landslide, with a clear majority in all four counties. Nixon was the first Republican to win the state of Hawaii and the only one until Ronald Reagan won the state in 1984. It is the last occasion, and the only one apart from a very marginal case in 1960, when Hawaii has voted more Republican than the nation as a whole – since then it has become consistently one of the "bluest" states in the nation.

1976 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 1976 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 4, 1976. All fifty states and the District of Columbia were part of the 1976 United States presidential election. Hawaii voters chose four electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Hawaii was won by Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter by 2.53 points. It was the only postbellum state won by Carter: since William McKinley in 1896 no other candidate has won the presidency whilst winning so few as one postbellum state. In fact, Carter did not win any other state west of the hundredth meridian, including the Pacific states of Oregon and California admitted before the civil war.

1980 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 1980 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 4, 1980. All 50 states and The District of Columbia, were part of the 1980 United States presidential election. Hawaii voters chose four electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Hawaii was won by President Jimmy Carter (D) by 1.9 points. Hawaii is a very liberal state, and both of the state's U.S. Senators have been Democrats since 1977, which is partly the reason Reagan lost, albeit very narrowly. As of 2016, this is the last time in which all counties in Hawaii did not vote for the same candidate.

1984 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 1984 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 6, 1984. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1984 United States presidential election. Hawaii voters chose 4 electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president of the United States.

Hawaii was won by incumbent United States President Ronald Reagan of California, who was running against former Vice President Walter Mondale of Minnesota. Reagan ran for a second time with former C.I.A. Director George H. W. Bush of Texas, and Mondale ran with Representative Geraldine Ferraro of New York, the first major female candidate for the vice presidency.

Hawaii weighed in for this election as 7% more Democratic than the national average. As a result of Reagan's victory in Hawaii, he became the second Republican presidential candidate to win Hawaii as well as the first won since Richard Nixon in 1972. To date, it is the last time Hawaii has voted for a Republican in a presidential election, making Hawaii one of six states Reagan was the last Republican to win; the others being Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island and Washington.

1988 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 1988 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 8, 1988. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1988 United States presidential election. Hawaii voters chose 4 electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Hawaii was won by Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis who was running against incumbent United States Vice President George H. W. Bush of Texas. Dukakis ran with Texas Senator Lloyd Bentsen as Vice President, and Bush ran with Indiana Senator Dan Quayle.

Hawaii weighed in for this election as 17% more Democratic than the national average.

1992 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 1992 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 3, 1992, as part of the 1992 United States presidential election. Voters chose four representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Hawaii was won by Governor Bill Clinton (D-Arkansas) with 48.09% of the popular vote over incumbent President George H.W. Bush (R-Texas) with 36.70%. Businessman Ross Perot (I-Texas) finished in third, with 14.22% of the popular vote, which was nonetheless Perot’s poorest showing outside the District of Columbia and antebellum slave states. Clinton ultimately won the national vote, defeating incumbent President Bush. Clinton comfortably won Hawaii by a margin of 11.39%. It has only voted Republican twice since its statehood (1972 for Richard Nixon, and 1984 for Ronald Reagan). These Republican wins were landslides for Presidents Nixon and Reagan who both carried 49 out of 50 states. Hawaii has remained reliably Democratic since.

1996 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 1996 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 5, 1996, as part of the 1996 United States presidential election. Voters chose 4 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Hawaii was won by President Bill Clinton (D) over Senator Bob Dole (R-KS), with Clinton winning 56.93% to 31.64% by a margin of 25.29%. Billionaire businessman Ross Perot (Reform Party of the United States of America-TX) finished in third, with 7.6% of the popular vote.

2000 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 2000 United States presidential election in Hawaii was part of the 2000 United States presidential election which took place on November 7, 2000. Voters chose 4 electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Hawaii was won by Vice President Al Gore by an 18.3% margin of victory. Gore also was victorious in every county and congressional districts of the state. Governor George W. Bush received 37.5% of the vote, while Nader obtained almost 6%.

Bush's best county result came in Honolulu County where he received 39.6% of the vote.

2004 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 2004 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 2, 2004. Voters chose 4 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Hawaii was won by Democratic nominee John Kerry by an 8.7% margin of victory. Prior to the election, all 12 news organizations considered this a state Kerry would win, or otherwise considered as a safe blue state. A Republican presidential nominee has carried the state only twice since its statehood (In 1972 and 1984).

This was the first time ever that Hawaii did not vote for an incumbent president who ran for, and was elected to, a second term.

2008 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 2008 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 4, 2008, and was part of the 2008 United States presidential election. Voters chose 4 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Hawaii, the state where Barack Obama was born, gave him 71.9% of the vote with a 45.3% margin of victory in 2008. Prior to the election, all 17 news organizations considered this a state Obama would win, or otherwise considered as a safe blue state. Hawaii has voted Democratic in every presidential election since 1988. Obama's margin of victory in this state is only surpassed by that of the District of Columbia and is the only actual state that gave either candidate more than 70% of the vote. Turnout here was much higher than previous elections.

2012 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 2012 United States presidential election in Hawaii took place on November 6, 2012, as part of the 2012 United States presidential election in which all 50 states plus The District of Columbia participated. Hawaii voters chose four electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting incumbent Democratic President Barack Obama and his running mate, Vice President Joe Biden, against Republican challenger and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney and his running mate, Congressman Paul Ryan. Prior to the election, 17 news organizations considered this a state Obama would win, or otherwise considered as a safe blue state. The Hawaiian-born president handily won the state's 4 electoral votes by a wide 42.71 percent margin of victory.

2016 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 2016 United States presidential election in Hawaii was held on November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 United States presidential election in which all 50 states and the District of Columbia participated. Hawaii voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College by a popular vote pitting the Republican Party's nominee, businessman Donald Trump, and running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence against Democratic Party nominee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her running mate, Virginia Senator Tim Kaine.

On March 1, 2016, in the presidential primaries, Hawaii voters expressed their preferences for the Republican and Constitution parties' respective nominees for president. The Green Party held its convention on May 21, along with its primary on May 28. The Democratic Party held its caucus on March 26. Registered members of each party only voted in their party's primary, while voters who were unaffiliated chose any one primary to vote in.

Hillary Clinton won the election in Hawaii with 62.2% of the vote, her highest vote percentage of any state, though a significant decrease from President Obama's 70.55% from 2012. Donald Trump received 30.0% of the vote, surpassing Mitt Romney's 2012 performance by 3%. Hawaii was one of two states where Hillary Clinton won every county, the other being Massachusetts. Hawaii was Green Party nominee Jill Stein's strongest performance, being the only state where she reached 3%.

Despite all of Hawaii's electoral votes being pledged to the Clinton/Kaine ticket, one faithless elector voted for Bernie Sanders for president and Elizabeth Warren for vice president.

2020 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 2020 United States presidential election in Hawaii is scheduled to take place on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States elections in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia will participate. Hawaii voters will choose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote. The state of Hawaii has 4 electoral votes in the Electoral College.As of May 2019, Donald Trump and Bill Weld are the declared Republican candidates. Tulsi Gabbard, the U.S. Representative for Hawaii's 2nd congressional district, is running. A number of other Democrats are running or have expressed interest in running, such as Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, and Bernie Sanders and former Vice President Joe Biden has announced they’re running.

Elections by year
Elections by state
Primaries and caucuses
Nominating conventions
Electoral College
and Popular vote
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