United States presidential elections in Alabama

Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Alabama, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1819, Alabama has participated in every U.S. presidential election except the election of 1864, during the American Civil War, when the state had seceded to join the Confederacy.

Winners of the state are in bold.

Presidential elections in Alabama
Map of the United States with Alabama highlighted
No. of elections49
Voted Democratic29
Voted Republican16
Voted Whig1
Voted Democratic-Republican1
Voted other2[a]
Voted for winning candidate26
Voted for losing candidate23

Elections from 1864 to present

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Other national
candidates[b]
Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
Notes
2016 Donald Trump 1,318,255 62.08 Hillary Clinton 729,547 34.36 - 9
2012 Barack Obama 795,696 38.36 Mitt Romney 1,255,925 60.55 - 9
2008 Barack Obama 813,479 38.74 John McCain 1,266,546 60.32 - 9
2004 George W. Bush 1,176,394 62.46 John Kerry 693,933 36.84 - 9
2000 George W. Bush 941,173 56.48 Al Gore 692,611 41.57 - 9
1996 Bill Clinton 662,165 43.16 Bob Dole 769,044 50.12 Ross Perot 92,149 6.01 9
1992 Bill Clinton 690,080 40.88 George H. W. Bush 804,283 47.65 Ross Perot 183,109 10.85 9
1988 George H. W. Bush 815,576 59.17 Michael Dukakis 549,506 39.86 - 9
1984 Ronald Reagan 872,849 60.54 Walter Mondale 551,899 38.28 - 9
1980 Ronald Reagan 654,192 48.75 Jimmy Carter 636,730 47.45 John B. Anderson 16,481 1.23 9
1976 Jimmy Carter 659,170 55.73 Gerald Ford 504,070 42.61 - 9
1972 Richard Nixon 728,701 72.43 George McGovern 256,923 25.54 - 9
1968 Richard Nixon 146,923 13.99 Hubert Humphrey 196,579 18.72 George Wallace 691,425 65.86 10
1964 Lyndon B. Johnson no ballots Barry Goldwater 479,085 69.45 Unpledged Democratic electors 210,732 30.55 10 Johnson did not appear on the ballot.
1960 John F. Kennedy 318,303 56.39 Richard Nixon 237,981 42.16 Harry F. Byrd
(unpledged Democratic Electors)
324,050 - 11 Electoral votes split: five Kennedy and six unpledged (Byrd).
1956 Dwight D. Eisenhower 195,694 39.39 Adlai Stevenson II 280,844 56.52 T. Coleman Andrews/
Unpledged Electors[c]
20,323 4.09 11 electoral vote split: 11 to Stevenson, 1 to Jones (faithless elector)
1952 Dwight D. Eisenhower 149,231 35.02 Adlai Stevenson II 275,075 64.55 - 11
1948 Harry S. Truman no ballots Thomas E. Dewey 40,930 19.04 Strom Thurmond 171,443 79.75 11 Truman did not appear on the ballot.
1944 Franklin D. Roosevelt 198,918 81.28 Thomas E. Dewey 44,540 18.2 - 11
1940 Franklin D. Roosevelt 250,726 85.22 Wendell Willkie 42,184 14.34 - 11
1936 Franklin D. Roosevelt 238,136 86.38 Alf Landon 35,358 12.82 - 11
1932 Franklin D. Roosevelt 207,910 84.74 Herbert Hoover 34,675 14.13 - 11
1928 Herbert Hoover 120,725 48.49 Al Smith 127,797 51.33 - 12
1924 Calvin Coolidge 45,005 27.01 John W. Davis 112,966 67.81 Robert M. La Follette Sr. 8,084 4.85 12
1920 Warren G. Harding 74,556 31.37 James M. Cox 159,965 67.31 - 12
1916 Woodrow Wilson 99,409 76.04 Charles E. Hughes 28,662 21.92 - 12
1912 Woodrow Wilson 82,438 69.89 Theodore Roosevelt 22,680 19.23 William H. Taft 9,807 8.31 12
1908 William H. Taft 25,561 24.31 William Jennings Bryan 74,391 70.75 - 11
1904 Theodore Roosevelt 22,472 20.66 Alton B. Parker 79,797 73.35 - 11
1900 William McKinley 55,612 34.82 William Jennings Bryan 97,129 60.82 - 11
1896 William McKinley 55,673 28.61 William Jennings Bryan 130,298 66.96 - 11
1892 Grover Cleveland 138,135 59.40 Benjamin Harrison 9,184 3.95 James B. Weaver 84,984 36.55 11
1888 Benjamin Harrison 57,177 32.66 Grover Cleveland 117,314 67.00 - 10
1884 Grover Cleveland 92,736 60.37 James G. Blaine 59,444 38.69 - 10
1880 James A. Garfield 56,350 37.10 Winfield S. Hancock 91,130 59.99 James B. Weaver 4,422 2.91 10
1876 Rutherford B. Hayes 68,708 40.02 Samuel J. Tilden 102,989 59.98 - 10
1872 Ulysses S. Grant 90,272 53.19 Horace Greeley 79,444 46.81 - 10
1868 Ulysses S. Grant 76,667 51.3 Horatio Seymour 72,921 48.7 - 8
1864 Abraham Lincoln n/a n/a George B. McClellan n/a n/a - n/a n/a n/a No vote due to secession.

Election of 1860

The election of 1860 was a complex realigning election in which the breakdown of the previous two-party alignment culminated in four parties each competing for influence in different parts of the country. The result of the election, with the victory of an ardent opponent of slavery, spurred the secession of eleven states and brought about the American Civil War.

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
1860 Abraham Lincoln no ballots - Stephen A. Douglas 13,618 15.1 John C. Breckinridge 48,669 54.0 John Bell 27,835 30.9 9

Elections from 1828 to 1856

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Other national
candidates[b]
Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
Notes
1856 James Buchanan 46,739 62.08 John C. Frémont Millard Fillmore 28,552 37.92 9 Frémont did not appear on the ballot
1852 Franklin Pierce 26,881 60.89 Winfield Scott 15,061 34.12 John P. Hale 9
1848 Zachary Taylor 30,482 49.43 Lewis Cass 31,173 50.56 Martin Van Buren 9
1844 James K. Polk 37,401 58.99 Henry Clay 26,002 41.01 9
1840 William Henry Harrison 28,518 45.62 Martin Van Buren 33,996 54.38 7
1836 Martin Van Buren 20,638 55.34 Hugh Lawson White 16,658 44.66 various[d] 7
1832 Andrew Jackson 14,286 99.97 Henry Clay 5 0.03 William Wirt 7
1828 Andrew Jackson 16,736 89.89 John Quincy Adams 1,878 10.09 5

Election of 1824

The election of 1824 was a complex realigning election following the collapse of the prevailing Democratic-Republican Party, resulting in four different candidates each claiming to carry the banner of the party, and competing for influence in different parts of the country. The election was the only one in history to be decided by the House of Representatives under the provisions of the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution after no candidate secured a majority of the electoral vote. It was also the only presidential election in which the candidate who received a plurality of electoral votes (Andrew Jackson) did not become President, a source of great bitterness for Jackson and his supporters, who proclaimed the election of Adams a corrupt bargain.

Year Winner (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Loser (nationally) Votes Percent Electoral
Votes
1824 Andrew Jackson 9,429 69.32 John Quincy Adams 2,422 17.80 Henry Clay 96 0.71 William H. Crawford 1,656 12.17 5

Election of 1820

In the election of 1820, incumbent President James Monroe ran effectively unopposed, winning all electoral votes (including Alabama's five electoral votes) except one vote in New Hampshire. The popular vote was primarily directed to filling the office of Vice President.

Notes

  1. ^ George Wallace, 1968; Strom Thurmond, 1948.
  2. ^ a b For purposes of these lists, other national candidates are defined as those who won at least one electoral vote, or won at least ten percent of the vote in multiple states.
  3. ^ Was allied with a slate of unpledged electors in Louisiana, Mississippi and South Carolina
  4. ^ Three other candidates ran and received electoral votes nationally as part of the unsuccessful Whig strategy to defeat Martin Van Buren by running four candidates with local appeal in different regions of the country. The others were William Henry Harrison, Daniel Webster, and Willie Person Mangum. None of these candidates appeared on the ballot in Alabama.
1820 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1820 United States presidential election in Alabama took place between November 1 and December 6, 1820, as part of the 1820 United States presidential election. The state legislature chose three representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

Alabama, along with eight other states, had its electors chosen not by the people, but by the State House and Senate. George W. Philips, Henry Minor and John Scott were selected by the legislature and all three men voted for James Monroe.

1824 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1824 United States presidential election in Alabama took place between October 26 and December 2, 1824, as part of the 1824 United States presidential election. Voters chose five representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

During this election, the Democratic-Republican Party was the only major national party, and four different candidates from this party sought the Presidency. Alabama voted for Andrew Jackson over John Quincy Adams, William H. Crawford and Henry Clay. Jackson won Alabama by a margin of 51.52%.

1828 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1828 United States presidential election in Alabama took place between October 31 and December 2, 1828, as part of the 1828 United States presidential election. Voters chose five representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

Alabama voted for the Democratic candidate, Andrew Jackson, over the National Republican candidate, John Quincy Adams. Jackson won Alabama by a margin of 79.80%.

1832 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1832 United States presidential election in Alabama took place between November 2 and December 5, 1832, as part of the 1832 United States presidential election. Voters chose seven representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Alabama voted for the Democratic candidate, Andrew Jackson, over the National Republican candidate, Henry Clay. Jackson won Alabama by a margin of 99.94%.

1836 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1836 United States presidential election in Alabama took place between November 3 and December 7, 1836, as part of the 1836 United States presidential election. Voters chose seven representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

Alabama voted for the Democratic candidate, Martin Van Buren, over Whig candidate Hugh White. Van Buren won Alabama by a margin of 10.68%.

1840 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1840 United States presidential election in Alabama took place between October 30 and December 2, 1840, as part of the 1840 United States presidential election. Voters chose seven representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

Alabama voted for the Democratic candidate, Martin Van Buren, over Whig candidate William Henry Harrison. Van Buren won Alabama by a margin of 8.76%. This is the last time that Alabama did not vote the same as neighboring Mississippi.

1844 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1844 United States presidential election in Alabama took place between November 1 and December 4, 1844, as part of the 1844 United States presidential election. Voters chose nine representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

Alabama voted for the Democratic candidate, James K. Polk, over Whig candidate Henry Clay. Polk won Alabama by a margin of 17.98%.

1848 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1848 United States presidential election in Alabama took place on November 7, 1848, as part of the 1848 United States presidential election. Voters chose nine representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

Alabama voted for the Democratic candidate, Lewis Cass, over Whig candidate Zachary Taylor. Cass won Alabama by a margin of 1.12%.

1852 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1852 United States presidential election in Alabama took place on November 2, 1852, as part of the 1852 United States presidential election. Voters chose nine representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Alabama voted for the Democratic candidate, Franklin Pierce, over Whig candidate Winfield Scott. Pierce won Alabama by a margin of 26.77%.

1856 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1856 United States presidential election in Alabama was held on November 4, 1856. Alabama voters chose 9 electors to represent the state in the Electoral College, which chose the president and vice president.

Alabama was won by Senator James Buchanan (D–Pennsylvania), running with Representative and future presidential candidate in the 1860 presidential election John C. Breckinridge, with 62.08% of the popular vote, against the 13th president of the United States Millard Fillmore (A–New York), running with the 2nd United States Ambassador to Germany Andrew Jackson Donelson, with 37.92% of the popular vote.

The Republican Party nominee John C. Frémont was not on the ballot.

1860 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1860 United States presidential election in Alabama took place on November 6, 1860, as part of the 1860 United States presidential election. Alabama voters chose nine representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Alabama was won by the 14th Vice President of the United States John Breckenridge (SD–Kentucky), running with Senator Joseph Lane, with 54.00% of the popular vote, against Senator John Bell (CU–Tennessee), running with the Governor of Massachusetts Edward Everett, with 30.89% of the popular vote and the 15th Senator Stephen A. Douglas (D–Vermont), running with 41st Governor of Georgia Herschel V. Johnson, with 15.11% of the popular vote.

Republican Party candidate Abraham Lincoln was not on the ballot in the state.

1868 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1868 United States presidential election in Alabama took place on November 3, 1868, as part of the 1868 United States presidential election. Alabama voters chose eight representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.Alabama was won by Ulysses S. Grant, formerly the 6th Commanding General of the United States Army (R-Ohio), running with Speaker of the House Schuyler Colfax, with 51.25% of the popular vote, against the 18th governor of New York, Horatio Seymour(D–New York), running with former Senator Francis Preston Blair, Jr., with 48.75% of the vote.

1872 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1872 United States presidential election in Alabama took place on November 5, 1872, as part of the 1872 United States presidential election. Voters chose ten representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Alabama voted for the Republican candidate, Ulysses S. Grant, over Liberal Republican candidate Horace Greeley. Grant won Alabama by a margin of 6.38%.

This was the last time that Alabama voted for a Republican until Barry Goldwater won it in the 1964 presidential election.

1876 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1876 United States presidential election in Alabama took place on November 7, 1876, as part of the 1876 United States presidential election. Alabama voters chose ten representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.Alabama was won by Samuel J. Tilden, the former governor of New York (D–New York), running with Thomas A. Hendricks, the governor of Indiana and future vice president, with 59.98% of the popular vote, against Rutherford B. Hayes, the governor of Ohio (R-Ohio), running with Representative William A. Wheeler, with 40.02% of the vote.

1880 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1880 United States presidential election in Alabama took place on November 2, 1880, as part of the 1880 United States presidential election. Alabama voters chose ten representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.Alabama was won by General Winfield Scott Hancock (D–Pennsylvania), running with former Representative William Hayden English, with 59.99% of the popular vote, against Representative James Garfield (R-Ohio), running with the 10th chairman of the New York State Republican Executive Committee Chester A. Arthur, with 37.10% of the vote.

1884 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1884 United States presidential election in Alabama took place on November 4, 1884, as part of the 1884 United States presidential election. Alabama voters chose ten representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.Alabama was won by Grover Cleveland, the 28th governor of New York, (D–New York), running with the former governor of Indiana Thomas A. Hendricks, with 60.37% of the popular vote, against Secretary of State James G. Blaine (R-Ohio), running with Senator John A. Logan, with 38.69% of the vote.

1932 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1932 United States presidential election in Alabama took place on November 8, 1932, as part of the 1932 United States presidential election. Alabama voters chose eleven representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Alabama was won by Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt (D–New York), running with Speaker John Nance Garner, with 84.74% of the popular vote, against incumbent President Herbert Hoover (R–California), running with Vice President Charles Curtis, with 14.13% of the popular vote.

1936 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 1936 United States presidential election in Alabama took place on November 3, 1936, as part of the 1936 United States presidential election. Voters chose eleven representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Alabama voted for the Democratic candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt over Republican candidate Alf Landon. Roosevelt won Alabama by a margin of 73.56%.

2020 United States presidential election in Alabama

The 2020 United States presidential election in Alabama is scheduled to take place on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States elections in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia will participate. Alabama voters will choose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote. The state of Alabama has 9 electoral votes in the Electoral College.In the 2016 United States presidential election, Trump won Alabama by a large margin (62.08% to Hillary Clinton's 34.36%). Alabama has voted for the Republican candidate in every election since it was won by Ronald Reagan in the 1980 election. Given this, Trump is favored to win Alabama in 2020, though the election of Democrat Doug Jones as Senator in 2018 may imply Alabama will not be won as handily as it was by Trump in 2016.

Birmingham was a potential host for the 2020 Democratic National Convention but was ultimately not selected.As of May 2019, Donald Trump and Bill Weld are the declared Republican candidates. A number of Democrats are running or have expressed interest in running, and Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, Beto O’Rourke, Pete Buttigieg, and former Vice President Joe Biden are among the major declared candidates.

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