United States congressional delegations from Alaska

These are tables of congressional delegations from Alaska to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives.

Lisa Murkowski
Alaska's current delegation

Senator Lisa Murkowski
(R)

Senator Dan Sullivan official

Senator Dan Sullivan
(R)

Don Young, official 115th Congress photo portrait

Rep. Don Young
(R)

United States Senate

Ernest Gruening was elected to the Senate on October 6, 1955 for the 84th Congress but did not take the oath of office and was not accorded senatorial privileges, Alaska not yet being admitted as a state.

Class 2 Senators Congress Class 3 Senators
Bob Bartlett (D)[1] 86th Congress
(1959–1961)
Ernest Gruening (D)
87th Congress
(1961–1963)
88th Congress
(1963–1965)
89th Congress
(1965–1967)
90th Congress
(1967–1969)
Ted Stevens (R)
91st Congress
(1969–1971)
Mike Gravel (D)
92nd Congress
(1971–1973)
93rd Congress
(1973–1975)
94th Congress
(1975–1977)
95th Congress
(1977–1979)
96th Congress
(1979–1981)
97th Congress
(1981–1983)
Frank Murkowski (R)
98th Congress
(1983–1985)
99th Congress
(1985–1987)
100th Congress
(1987–1989)
101st Congress
(1989–1991)
102nd Congress
(1991–1993)
103rd Congress
(1993–1995)
104th Congress
(1995–1997)
105th Congress
(1997–1999)
106th Congress
(1999–2001)
107th Congress
(2001–2003)
Lisa Murkowski (R)
108th Congress
(2003–2005)
109th Congress
(2005–2007)
110th Congress
(2007–2009)
Mark Begich (D) 111th Congress
(2009–2011)
112th Congress
(2011–2013)
113th Congress
(2013–2015)
Dan Sullivan (R) 114th Congress
(2015–2017)
115th Congress
(2017–2019)
116th Congress
(2019–2021)

House of Representatives

Delegates from Alaska Territory

From May 17, 1884 to August 24, 1912, Alaska was designated as the District of Alaska. From then to January 3, 1959, it was the Alaska Territory.

Congress Delegate
59th (1905–1907) Frank Hinman Waskey (D)
60th (1907–1909) Thomas Cale (I)
61st (1909–1911) James Wickersham (R)
62nd (1911–1913)
63rd (1913–1915)
64th (1915–1917)
65th (1917–1919) Charles August Sulzer (D)
James Wickersham[2] (R)
66th (1919–1921) Charles August Sulzer[1] (D)
George Barnes Grigsby (D)
James Wickersham[3] (R)
67th (1921–1923) Daniel Alexander Sutherland (R)
68th (1923–1925)
69th (1925–1927)
70th (1927–1929)
71st (1929–1931)
72nd (1931–1933) James Wickersham (R)
73rd (1933–1935) Anthony Joseph Dimond (D)
74th (1935–1937)
75th (1937–1939)
76th (1939–1941)
77th (1941–1943)
78th (1943–1945)
79th (1945–1947) Bob Bartlett (D)
80th (1947–1949)
81st (1949–1951)
82nd (1951–1953)
83rd (1953–1955)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959)

Members from the State of Alaska

Congress District
Alaska's at-large congressional district
86th
(1959–1961)
Ralph Julian Rivers (D)
87th
(1961–1963)
88th
(1963–1965)
89th
(1965–1967)
90th
(1967–1969)
Howard Wallace Pollock (R)
91st
(1969–1971)
92nd
(1971–1973)
Nick Begich[1][4] (D)
Don Young[5] (R)
93rd
(1973–1975)
94th
(1975–1977)
95th
(1977–1979)
96th
(1979–1981)
97th
(1981–1983)
98th
(1983–1985)
99th
(1985–1987)
100th
(1987–1989)
101st
(1989–1991)
102nd
(1991–1993)
103rd
(1993–1995)
104th
(1995–1997)
105th
(1997–1999)
106th
(1999–2001)
107th
(2001–2003)
108th
(2003–2005)
109th
(2005–2007)
110th
(2007–2009)
111th
(2009–2011)
112th
(2011–2013)
113th
(2013–2015)
114th
(2015–2017)
115th
(2017–2019)
116th
(2019–2021)

Living former Members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Alaska's at-large congressional district

As of May 2015, there are no former members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Alaska's at-large congressional district who are currently living at this time. The most recent representative to die was Howard Wallace Pollock (1967-1971) on January 9, 2011.

Living former U.S. Senators from Alaska

As of April 2015, there are three former U.S. Senators from the U.S. State of Alaska who are currently living at this time, one from Class 2 and two in Class 3.

Senator Term of office Class Date of birth (and age)
Mike Gravel 1969–1981 3 May 13, 1930 (age 89)
Frank Murkowski 1981–2002 3 March 28, 1933 (age 86)
Mark Begich 2009–2015 2 March 30, 1962 (age 57)

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Died in office.
  2. ^ Successfully contested the election of George Barnes Grigsby, the representative who replaced Charles August Sulzer.
  3. ^ Contested the election of Charles August Sulzer, and when Sulzer died, continued the contest against his successor George Barnes Grigsby and won.
  4. ^ Disappeared October 16, 1972, re-elected November 7, declared dead December 29.
  5. ^ Elected to fill the vacancy caused by the previous representative, Nick Begich being re-elected (presumably posthumously) to the next term.

Key

Key to party colors and abbreviations for members of the U.S. Congress
American (Know Nothing) (K-N)
Anti-Jacksonian (Anti-J),
National Republican (NR)
Anti-Administration (Anti-Admin)
Anti-Masonic (Anti-M)
Conservative (Con)
Democratic (D)
Dixiecrat (Dix),
States' rights (SR)
Democratic-Republican (D-R)
Farmer–Labor (FL)
Federalist (F)
Free Soil (FS)
Free Silver (FSv)
Fusion (FU)
Greenback (GB)
Jacksonian (J)
Nonpartisan League (NPL)
Nullifier (N)
Opposition Northern (O)
Opposition Southern (O)
Populist (Pop)
Pro-Administration (Pro-Admin)
Progressive (Prog)
Prohibition (Proh)
Readjuster (Rea)
Republican (R)
Socialist (Soc)
Unionist (U)
Whig (W)
Independent,
None,
or Unaffiliated
2010 United States House of Representatives election in Alaska

An election was held on November 2, 2010, to determine the U.S. Representative for Alaska's At-large congressional district, which includes the entire state of Alaska. Don Young, the incumbent and a member of the Republican Party, was re-elected to a twentieth term to serve in the 112th Congress from January 3, 2011 until January 3, 2013. A primary election was held on August 24, 2010.

Index of Alaska-related articles

The following is an alphabetical list of articles related to the U.S. state of Alaska.

List of United States Representatives from Alaska

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Alaska. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state (through the present day), see United States Congressional Delegations from Alaska. The list of names should be complete (as of January 3, 2015), but other data may be incomplete. It includes members who have represented both the state and the Territory, both past and present.

List of United States Senators from Alaska

Alaska was admitted to the Union on January 3, 1959. Alaska's United States Senate seats belong to Class 2 and Class 3. The state's current Senators are Republicans Lisa Murkowski (serving since 2002) and Dan Sullivan (serving since 2015). A total of eight people have represented Alaska in the U.S. Senate.

List of people from Alaska

This is a list of notable people from Alaska. This list includes individuals who were born in Alaska, grew up there, retired there, or in any other fashion lived there even if for only a brief period of time (such as infancy, during one or more of the many gold rushes during the late 19th century and early 20th century, or as a result of rapid military influx and outflux from 1940 onward).

Key to table entries:

Name

Year born

Year died

Communities lived in in Alaska

Noted for

Lists of United States Congress

This is an incomplete list of lists pertaining to the United States Congress.

Outline of Alaska

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the U.S. state of Alaska:

Alaska – most extensive, northernmost, westernmost, highest, second newest, and least densely populated of the 50 states of the United States of America. Alaska occupies the westernmost extent of the Americas, bordering British Columbia and the Yukon, and is detached from the other 49 states. The summit of Denali (formerly Mount McKinley) at 6194 meters is the highest point of North America.

Alaska's delegation to the United States Congress
Senators
Representative
Other states' delegations
Non-voting delegations
Years in Alaska (1959–present)
States
Others
Obsolete

Languages

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