United States Women's Football League

The United States Women's Football League (USWFL) is a full-contact women's American football league that opened with exhibition play in 2010 and subsequently played its first regular season in 2011. The league was known as the "Women's Spring Football League" from 2009–2015. It is the newest of three full-contact, 11-on-11 football leagues for women, along with the Independent Women's Football League and the Women's Football Alliance.

The USWFL played with 11-player and 8-player divisions from 2011 through 2013. In 2014, the league split into two leagues, with the 11-woman division retaining the WSFL name and the 8-woman division taking the name the Women's Eights Football League (W8FL). In 2016, the league played only 11-woman football with the Cincinnati Sizzle taking the league crown.

United States Women's Football League
WSFL2011
SportWomen's American football
Founded2009
No. of teams9 for 2019 season
CountryUnited States
Most recent
champion(s)
Washington Prodigy(USWFL) & Hampton Roads Lady Gators (Ironwoman)

History

United States Women's Football League (USWFL)

The USWFL was founded as the Women's Spring Football League in 2009. A few teams played an exhibition season under the WSFL banner in 2010, with the Kansas City Storm going undefeated in the regular season but no playoffs or league championship game were played resulting in no league champion being crowned.

In 2011, the USWFL played what it regards as its first official regular season. The Baltimore Burn finished the season with a 6–0 record against non-league foes and claimed the 2011 WSFL championship on the basis of regular season record.

In 2012, the USWFL staged its first playoffs and held its first league championship game at Endless Mountains Stadium in Towanda, Pennsylvania. The New Jersey Titans defeated the DFW Xtreme, 67–6, to claim the 2012 WSFL championship.

In 2013, the USWFL staged its second playoffs and held its second league championship game in Memphis, Tennessee. The Memphis Dynasty defeated the Arkansas Banshees, 32–12, to claim the title.

In 2014, the USWFL staged its third playoffs and held its third league championship game in Erie, Pennsylvania. The Memphis Dynasty defeated the Arkansas Banshees, 34–12, to claim their second straight WSFL championship.

In 2015, the USWFL staged its fourth playoffs and held its fourth league championship game in Hummelstown, Pennsylvania. The Keystone Assault defeated the Tennessee Legacy, 9–7, to claim their first WSFL championship.
In 2016, the Cincinnati Sizzle defeated the New England Nightmare 30–6 at Horn Lake, Mississippi to claim their first league championship.
In 2017, the Washington Prodigy beat the Houston Wildcats 44-0 to win the league championship game in Bristol, Tennessee. In the Ironwoman Championship the Tri-Cities Thunder beat the West Virginia Wildfire 28-0.

Women's Eights Football League (W8FL)

The WSFL started an eight-woman division in 2011. The Cape Fear Thunder claimed the WSFL's first eight-player division championship with a 4–2–1 regular season record.

In 2012, the West Virginia Wildfire captured the WSFL title in the 8-player division with a 5–2 record.

In 2013, the WSFL held its first championship game in the eight-player division. The West Virginia Wildfire defeated the Binghamton Tiger Cats, 44–8, to claim their second straight championship in the eight-player division.

In 2014, the eight-player division spun off into its own league, taking the name the Women's Eights Football League (W8FL). The Cape Fear Thunder won their second eight-player championship by defeating the West Virginia Wildfire, 34–26, in the W8FL title game.
In 2015, the New York Knockout defeated the Cape Fear Thunder, 28–0, to win their first W8FL championship title, with the game having been played in Schenectady, New York.

Teams

2019 United States Women's Football League (USWFL)

2019 Teams

Team Location Home Field
Central Carolina Cardinals Raeford, North Carolina
Detroit Pride Detroit, Michigan
DMV Knights Prince George County, Maryland
Fayetteville Fierce Fayetteville, North Carolina Reid Ross High School in Fayetteville
Hampton Roads Lady Gators Norfolk, Virginia Old Dominion University Powhatan Field
Keystone Assault Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Lower Dauphin Middle School, Hummelstown, PA
Tri-Cities Thunder Piney Flats, Tennessee Stone Castle in Bristol
Washington Prodigy Washington, D.C. Woodrow Wilson High School
West Virginia Wildfire South Charleston, West Virginia Little Creek Park

Expansion 2020 & Inactive Teams

Team Location Home Field
Baltimore Burn Baltimore, Maryland Patterson Park
Carolina Queens North Carolina
Colorado Angels Denver, Colorado
Delaware Falcons Delaware N/A
Erie Illusion Erie, Pennsylvania N/A
Memphis Tennessee Legacy Memphis, Tennessee
New Orleans Krewe Kenner, Louisiana N/A
Southern Indiana Storm Paoli, Indiana Paoli Community Park Complex Field
Southern Reapers Whitwell, Tennessee N/A
Virginia Venom Alexandria, Virginia
Winchester Tyrants Winchester, Virginia

USWFL Championship Game Results

Year Winner Loser Score
2011 Baltimore Burn Baltimore declared league champion with 6–0 record no game played
2012 New Jersey Titans Dallas/FortWorth Xtreme 67–6
2013 Memphis Dynasty Arkansas Banshees 32–12
2014 Memphis Dynasty Arkansas Banshees 34–12
2015 Keystone Assault Tennessee Legacy 9–7
2016 Cincinnati Sizzle New England Nightmare 30–6
2017 Washington Prodigy Houston Wildcats 44-0
2018 Washington Prodigy North Florida Pumas 20-0

USWFL IronWoman Championship Game Results

Year Winner Loser Score
2017 Tri-Cities Thunder West Virginia Wildfire 28-0
2018 Hampton Roads Lady Gators Tri-Cities Thunder 20-14

WSFL 8s Championship Game Results 2011–2015

Year Winner Loser Score
2011 Cape Fear Thunder Cape Fear declared league champion with 4–2–1 record no game played
2012 West Virginia Wildfire West Virginia declared league champion with 5–2 record no game played
2013 West Virginia Wildfire Binghamton Tiger Cats 44–8
2014 Cape Fear Thunder West Virginia Wildfire 34–26
2015 New York Knockout Cape Fear Thunder 28–0

Former USWFL and W8FL teams playing elsewhere

  • Kansas City Storm – played in USWFL in 2010, then as an independent team, now a member of Women's Xtreme Football League of Kansas/Oklahoma.
  • Nevada Storm – played in USWFL from 2011–2012, then left to join Women's Football Alliance.
  • North Florida Pumas – played in USWFL now in Women's National Football Conference.
  • Rocky Mountain Thunderkatz – played in USWFL in 2014, then returned to Women's Football Alliance.

External links

Alliance of American Football

The Alliance of American Football (AAF) is a minor professional American football league, founded by Charlie Ebersol and Bill Polian. It began play on February 9, 2019, six days after the National Football League's (NFL) Super Bowl LIII championship game. The AAF consists of eight centrally owned and operated teams. All teams except Salt Lake are located in cities on or south of the 35th parallel and all teams except Birmingham are located in metropolitan areas that have at least one major professional sports franchise. Of the eight teams in the league, all but Arizona and Atlanta are located in markets lacking an NFL team.

American Arena League

The American Arena League (AAL) is a minor professional indoor football league that began playing in 2018. The league was initiated by a merger between Arena Pro Football (APF) and the Can-Am Indoor Football League (Can-Am), although it claimed only the APF history after the former Can-Am founder left the league. Teams from both leagues, new teams, and later teams from Supreme Indoor Football and National Arena League constituted the new league for its inaugural season.

Champions Indoor Football

Champions Indoor Football (CIF) is a professional indoor American football league created in 2014 out of the merger between the Champions Professional Indoor Football League (CPIFL) and Lone Star Football League (LSFL), plus one team from the Indoor Football League and two expansion teams. Players are paid $75 – $300 per game before taxes. No other benefits are provided.

Cincinnati Sizzle

The Cincinnati Sizzle is a women's professional full-contact/tackle football team from Cincinnati, Ohio. The team was established in 2003, by former Cincinnati Bengals running back Ickey Woods. Steve Sherman is the current owner of the Cincinnati Sizzle, as of the 2018 season, with Pam Schreiner as President. Michelle Terrel continues in her 15th year as General Manager. The regular season spans from April to July. Currently the home games are played at Walnut Hills High School (Cincinnati).

The Sizzle played in the National Women's Football Association (NWFA) for 4 seasons 2005 to 2008. Later joined the Women's Football Alliance (WFA) in 2009 to 2014. In the 2013 WFA season the Cincinnati Sizzle made its first ever playoff appearance as a first-round wild-card match-up against the Pittsburgh Passion. By the 2014 season the Women's Football Alliance (WFA) had 63 teams across the United States making it the largest-ever women's tackle football league in the world.

In 2015, the Cincinnati Sizzle joined the United States Women's Football League (USWFL) formerly the Women's Spring Football League (WSFL) and won the semi-finals playoff rival game against West Virginia. In 2016, the Cincinnati Sizzle ranked no. 2 at the beginning of the post season and hosted their first ever semifinal playoff game against Memphis Tn Legacy at Woodward High School. The Cincinnati Sizzle beat the New England Nightmare 30-6 and claimed their first national title in the 2016 United States Women's Football League Championship Game played on Saturday, July 30, 2016 in Horn Lake, Mississippi. As of 2017, Cincinnati Sizzle plays in the Women's Football Alliance (WFA) .

College Football Hall of Fame

The College Football Hall of Fame is a hall of fame and interactive attraction devoted to college football. The National Football Foundation (NFF) founded the Hall in 1951 to immortalize the players and coaches of college football.

From 1995 to 2012, the Hall was located in South Bend, Indiana.

In August 2014, the Chick-fil-A College Football Hall of Fame opened in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. The facility is a 94,256 square feet (8,756.7 m2) attraction located in the heart of Atlanta's sports, entertainment and tourism district, and is adjacent to the Georgia World Congress Center and Centennial Olympic Park.

Erie Illusion

The Erie Illusion was a women's football team playing in the United States Women's Football League and they were based in Erie, Pennsylvania. Their team colors was orange and purple; the team played at Erie Veterans Memorial Stadium. Mary Butler was the owner and general manager of the franchise. Troy Allen was the Illusion's final head coach.

Freedom Football League

The Freedom Football League (FFL) is a planned professional spring-summer American football league.

Independent Women's Football League

The Independent Women's Football League (IWFL) is a full-contact Women's American football league that was founded in 2000 and began play in 2001. It is one of three 11-on-11 U.S. football leagues for women, along with the Women's Football Alliance and the United States Women's Football League, and the oldest of the three. Laurie Frederick, Deborah DelToro, and K Disney are the league's founders.

The players are not paid to play; on the contrary, players must contribute funds to cover part of their expenses.

Indoor Football League

The Indoor Football League (IFL) is a professional indoor American football league created in 2008 out of the merger between the Intense Football League and United Indoor Football. The league is the second highest tier in indoor/arena football behind the Arena Football League (AFL), and has operated continuously under the same name and corporate structure longer than any other current indoor football league, considering that the AFL's 2009 season was cancelled and the original league filed for bankruptcy that year. IFL players earn a minimum of US$200 per game played (before taxes). The season is typically about 14 games long, plus playoffs of two or more rounds.

List of American and Canadian football leagues

This is a list of current and defunct leagues of American football and Canadian football.

There have been professional Football leagues of varying levels since the invention of the sport, and over time the leagues in North America settled into an unofficial hierarchy. There's a major league designation, but contrary to the other major sports in the US (MLB, MLS, NBA and NHL) no formal development farm system is in use, after the cancellation of NFL Europe in 2006. Over the years there was an attempt to organize a development league such as the Association of Professional Football Leagues, and the after mentioned World League of American Football/NFL Europe.

In the vacuum a lot of ambitious entrepreneurs try to build a rival leagues to the NFL, but beside the AAFC and the AFL that merge with the NFL, none of the other league succeed. Over time there was attempts to start a rival major leagues (the last one was the USFL), but most of them were high-level minor leagues such as the XFL and the UFL.

Most of the leagues were separated through the years to three categories: high-level (for example: PCPFL or the XFL and the UFL), low-level (American Football Association or Spring Football League) and semi-professional leagues. Today there are two more levels: mid-level (FXFL or the future APL) and developmental leagues (The Spring League and the Amateur to Professional Developmental Football League).

The categories are usually determined by the following rules: the high-level leagues salary is above median US wage, the mid-level pays around the median wage and the low-level pays around or below the US minimum wage. The developmental leagues don't pay salaries or construct with a non-NFL eligible players, and designed to showcase the players' skills for future opportunities.

The Indoor variation of football also has an unofficial minor-leagues hierarchy: high-level (Indoor Football League), mid-level (for example: American Arena League or Champions Indoor Football) and regional leagues, but pays much less.

Today, there are only three major professional gridiron football leagues in North America: the National Football League (American football), the Canadian Football League (Canadian football) and Arena Football League (Indoor football).

National Arena League

The National Arena League (NAL) is a professional indoor football league that began play in 2017. It consists of six teams based in the East Coast of the United States.

National Gridiron League (United States)

The National Gridiron League (NGL) is a proposed indoor football league based out of Jacksonville, Florida. It that plans to start play in spring 2019 with 12 teams aligned in two divisions. The season was announced to start on March 30, 2019, and conclude with the inaugural Gridiron Bowl game on August 10, 2019, in Biloxi, Mississippi. However, the league has pushed back the announced start of the inaugural season to May 2019 amid reports the league has not had finalized leases for many of its teams.

Pro Football Hall of Fame

The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame for professional American football, located in Canton, Ohio. Opened in 1963, the Hall of Fame enshrines exceptional figures in the sport of professional football, including players, coaches, franchise owners, and front-office personnel, almost all of whom made their primary contributions to the game in the National Football League (NFL); the Hall inducts between four and eight new enshrinees each year. The Hall of Fame's Mission is to "Honor the Heroes of the Game, Preserve its History, Promote its Values & Celebrate Excellence EVERYWHERE."

The Hall of Fame class of 2019 (Tony Gonzalez, Ed Reed, Champ Bailey, Ty Law, Kevin Mawae, Pat Bowlen, Gil Brandt, and Johnny Robinson) were selected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame by a 48-member selection committee and announced on February 2, 2019. Including the 2019 class, there are now a total of 326 members of the Hall of Fame.

Sports in Erie, Pennsylvania

There are numerous sports teams in Erie, Pennsylvania, all of which are minor league. There are also numerous college sports teams along with high school teams. District 10 high school sports are played in the area, often with close results due to the even distribution of athletic talent. Throughout history, Erie has had various semi-pro and professional sports teams. The city hosts the nationally recognized McDonald's Classic.

United States national American football team

The United States National American football team represents the United States in international men's American football competitions. It is currently controlled by USA Football and is recognized by the International Federation of American Football (IFAF).

During the 2015 split between IFAF Paris and IFAF New York, in which IFAF Paris expelled USA Football in 2017. USA Football was replaced by the United States Federation of American Football in Paris, while New York retained USA Football as their active member.

The United States is the most successful team at the IFAF World Championship, winning on all three of their entries in the tournament, most recently when hosting the event in 2015. The U.S. team suffered its first defeat at the 2017 World Games, being represented by college players selected by USFAF.

United States women's national American football team

The United States Women's National American Football Team is the official American football senior national team of the United States.

Women's American football

Women's gridiron football, more commonly known as women's American football, women's Canadian football, or simply women's football, is a form of gridiron football (American or Canadian) played by women. Most leagues play by the same rules as their male counterparts, with one exception: women's leagues use a slightly smaller football. Women primarily play on a semi-professional or amateur level in the United States. Very few high schools or colleges offer the sport solely for women and girls; however, on occasion, it is permissible for a female player to join the otherwise male team.

The first evidence of women playing organized football was in 1926. It was then that an NFL team called the Frankford Yellow Jackets (the predecessors to the modern Philadelphia Eagles) employed a women's team for halftime entertainment.

Women's Football Alliance

The Women's Football Alliance (WFA) is a full-contact Women's American football league that began play in 2009. It is one of three full-contact, 11-on-11 football leagues for women, along with the Independent Women's Football League and the United States Women's Football League, and the largest of the three. The league is owned and operated by Jeff and Lisa King of Exeter, California.

XFL (2020)

The XFL is a planned professional American football league owned by Vince McMahon's Alpha Entertainment, and is headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut. It is a successor to the previous XFL, which was controlled by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF, now WWE) and NBC, and ran for a single season in 2001. The league will follow a similar structure as the original XFL did in 2001, with eight teams, centrally owned and operated by the league and spread across the United States in markets currently or recently represented by a National Football League (NFL) franchise, competing in a ten-game season and a two-week postseason in the winter and spring months.

In announcing the reformed XFL, McMahon stated that while it would share its name and trademark with the previous incarnation, it will not rely on professional wrestling-inspired features and entertainment elements as its predecessor did, instead aiming to create a league with fewer off-field controversies and faster, simpler play compared to the NFL.

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