United States Senate Vice Presidential Bust Collection

The United States Senate Vice Presidential Bust Collection is a series of 45 busts in the United States Capitol, each one bearing the likenesses of a Vice President of the United States. Each sculpture, from John Adams to Dick Cheney, honors the role of the Vice President as both a member of the executive branch and as president of the Senate.

The Joint Committee on the Library, acting under a resolution of May 13, 1886, was the first to commission busts of the vice presidents to occupy the niches in the new Senate Chamber. After the first 20 busts filled the niches surrounding the Chamber, later additions were placed throughout the Senate wing of the Capitol. The collection is incomplete, since the busts of former Vice Presidents Al Gore, and Joe Biden, as well as current Vice President Mike Pence are in the process of being created.[1][2]

List of busts

Vice President Image[note 1] Sculptor Year completed Notes
John Adams BustJohn Adams Daniel Chester French 1890 [3]
Thomas Jefferson BustThomasJefferson Moses Jacob Ezekiel 1888 [4]
Aaron Burr Aaron Burr bust Jacques Jouvenal 1893 [5]
George Clinton BustGeorgeClinton Vittorio A. Ciani 1894 [6]
Elbridge Gerry BustElbridgeGerry Herbert Samuel Adams 1892 [7]
Daniel D. Tompkins Daniel D. Tompkins bust Charles Henry Niehaus 1891 [8]
John C. Calhoun BustJohnCalhoun Theodore Augustus Mills 1896 [9]
Martin Van Buren BustMartinVanBuren Ulric Stonewall Jackson Dunbar 1894 [10]
Richard M. Johnson BustRichardJohnson James Paxton Voorhees 1895 [11]
John Tyler BustJohnTyler William C. McCauslen 1898 [12]
George M. Dallas George M Dallas by Henry Jackson Ellicott 1893 Henry Jackson Ellicott 1893 [13]
Millard Fillmore Millard Fillmore bust Robert Cushing 1895 [14]
William R. King William R. King bust William C. McCauslen 1896 [15]
John C. Breckinridge John-C.-Breckinridge-bust-by-James-Paxton-Voorhees James Paxton Voorhees 1896 [16]
Hannibal Hamlin Hannibal Hamlin bust Franklin Bachelder Simmons 1889 [17]
Andrew Johnson Andrew Johnson bust William C. McCauslen 1900 [18]
Schuyler Colfax Schuyler Colfax bust Frances Murphy Goodwin 1897 [19]
Henry Wilson Henry Wilson bust Daniel Chester French 1885 [20]
William A. Wheeler William A. Wheeler bust Edward Clark Potter 1892 [21]
Chester A. Arthur Chester A. Arthur bust Augustus Saint-Gaudens 1891 [22]
Thomas A. Hendricks Thomas A. Hendricks bust Ulric Stonewall Jackson Dunbar 1890 [23]
Levi P. Morton Levi P. Morton bust Frank Edwin Elwell 1891 [24]
Adlai E. Stevenson Adlai E. Stevenson bust Franklin Bachelder Simmons 1894 [25]
Garret A. Hobart Gahobart Frank Edwin Elwell 1901 [26]
Theodore Roosevelt Theodore Roosevelt bust James Earle Fraser 1910 [27]
Charles W. Fairbanks Bust of Charles W Fairbanks Franklin Bachelder Simmons 1905 [28]
James S. Sherman BustJamesSSherman Bessie Onahotema Potter Vonnoh 1911 [29]
Thomas R. Marshall Thomas R. Marshall bust Moses A. Wainer Dykaar 1918 [30]
Calvin Coolidge Calvin Coolidge bust Moses A. Wainer Dykaar 1927 [31]
Charles G. Dawes Jo Davidson 1930 [32]
Charles Curtis Charles Curtis bust Moses A. Wainer Dykaar 1934 [33]
John N. Garner James Earle Fraser 1943 [34]
Henry A. Wallace Jo Davidson 1947 [35]
Harry S. Truman Charles Keck 1947 [36]
Alben W. Barkley Kalervo Kallio 1958 [37]
Richard M. Nixon Gualberto Rocchi 1966 [38]
Lyndon B. Johnson Jimilu Mason 1966 [39]
Hubert H. Humphrey HumphreyHHBust Walker Kirtland Hancock 1982 [40]
Spiro T. Agnew William Frederick Behrends 1995 [41]
Gerald R. Ford Walker Kirtland Hancock 1985 [42]
Nelson A. Rockefeller NelsonARockefellerBust John Calabro 1987 [43]
Walter F. Mondale Judson R. Nelson 1987 [44]
George H. W. Bush Walker Kirtland Hancock 1990 [45]
J. Danforth Quayle Frederick E. Hart 2002 [46]
Albert A. Gore, Jr. Incomplete "In process" TBD [47]
Richard B. Cheney William Frederick Behrends 2015 [48]
Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Incomplete "Not yet commissioned" TBD [47]
Michael R. Pence Incomplete TBD TBD

Notes

  1. ^ Due to the sculptor's copyright, only images of busts carved before 1924 are included in this article, as well busts whose sculptor died before 1949.

References

  1. ^ Senate Vice Presidential Bust Collection, United States Senate.
  2. ^ The Vice Presidential Bust Collection, United States Senate.
  3. ^ John Adams. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  4. ^ Thomas Jefferson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  5. ^ Aaron Burr. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  6. ^ George Clinton. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  7. ^ Elbridge Gerry. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  8. ^ Daniel D. Tompkins. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  9. ^ John C. Calhoun. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  10. ^ Martin Van Buren. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  11. ^ Richard M. Johnson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  12. ^ John Tyler. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  13. ^ George M. Dallas. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  14. ^ Millard Fillmore. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  15. ^ William R. King. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  16. ^ John C. Breckenridge. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  17. ^ Hannibal Hamlin. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  18. ^ Andrew Johnson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  19. ^ Schuyler Colfax. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  20. ^ Henry Wilson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  21. ^ William A. Wheeler. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  22. ^ Chester A. Arthur. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  23. ^ Thomas A. Hendricks. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  24. ^ Levi P. Morton. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  25. ^ Adlai E. Stevenson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  26. ^ Garret A. Hobart. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  27. ^ Theodore Roosevelt. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  28. ^ Charles W. Fairbanks. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  29. ^ James S. Sherman. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  30. ^ Thomas R. Marshall. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  31. ^ Calvin Coolidge. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  32. ^ Charles G. Dawes. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  33. ^ Charles Curtis. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  34. ^ John N. Garner. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  35. ^ Henry A. Wallace. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  36. ^ Harry S. Truman. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  37. ^ Alben W. Barkley. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  38. ^ Richard M. Nixon. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  39. ^ Lyndon B. Johnson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  40. ^ Hubert H. Humphrey. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  41. ^ Spiro T. Agnew. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  42. ^ Gerald R. Ford. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  43. ^ Nelson A. Rockefeller. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  44. ^ Walter F. Mondale. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  45. ^ George H. W. Bush. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  46. ^ J. Danforth Quayle. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  47. ^ a b "Busts of Vice Presidents of the United States". Architect of the Capitol. Retrieved 2018-10-08.
  48. ^ Richard B. Cheney. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.

Coordinates: 38°53′27″N 77°00′26″W / 38.89083°N 77.00722°W

Charles Henry Niehaus

Charles Henry Niehaus (January 24, 1855 – June 19, 1935), was an American sculptor.

Franklin Simmons

Franklin Bachelder Simmons (January 11, 1839 – December 8, 1913) was a prominent American sculptor of the nineteenth century. Three of his statues are in the National Statuary Hall Collection, three of his busts are in the United States Senate Vice Presidential Bust Collection, and his statue of Ulysses S. Grant is in the United States Capitol Rotunda.

Henry Jackson Ellicott

Henry Jackson Ellicott (June 22 or 23, 1847 in Annapolis, Maryland – February 11, 1901 in Washington, D.C.) was an American sculptor and architectural sculptor, best known for his work on American Civil War monuments.

Jo Davidson

Jo Davidson (March 30, 1883 – January 2, 1952) was an American sculptor. Although he specialized in realistic, intense portrait busts, Davidson did not require his subjects to formally pose for him; rather, he observed and spoke with them. He worked primarily with clay, while the final products were typically cast in terra-cotta or bronze, or carved from marble.

John Calabro

John Calabro (May 8, 1914 – 1994) is an American artist and sculptor who has created coins, medals, plaques, busts, statutes and heroic-size works of famous events and notable figures from the world of politics, sports and entertainment. Calabro was commissioned by the Rockefeller family to create the bust of former Vice President Nelson Rockefeller for the United States Senate Vice Presidential Bust Collection.

Born in New York City on May 8, 1914, Calabro came from a family of sculptors and artists. Educated at the Cooper Union in New York City, Calabro did further studies at Milan's Academy of Fine Arts. He studied with Gaetano Cecere and did an apprenticeship with a firm in Newark, New Jersey.Calabro moved from Demarest, New Jersey to nearby Northvale in 1964 to a custom-designed home with a studio equipped with skylights, which enabled natural light to fill the space and allow the artist to see fine details and shadows over the course of the day. The studio was used to complete all but his largest works of art.The family of former Vice President of the United States Nelson Rockefeller specifically requested that Calabro be chosen to execute a bust of Rockefeller for exhibit and donated additional funds to cover the costs of the work. Issues were raised by Architect of the Capitol George M. White about what was perceived as a "definite lack of personality" in Calabro's work and Vincent Palumbo was given the job by White of creating a finished marble bust based on the plaster model created by Calabro. Both artists attended the ceremonies held on June 1, 1987, where the bust, a youthful depiction of Rockefeller, was put on formal display at the Capitol as part of the United States Senate Vice Presidential Bust Collection.Abraham Lincoln was a favorite subject of Calabro's, as he was drawn to the president's "humble birth" and "great ambition". Works Calabro created depicting Lincoln, created using a favorite photo taken during the 1860 presidential race, include a bust put on display at the Library of Presidential Papers (now known as the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress) as well as a 1948 larger-than-life statue of Lincoln on display in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Among more recent presidents, Calabro created medals crafted of bronze and silver depicting Richard Nixon's resignation and the succeeding Inauguration of Gerald Ford. Medals of Louis Armstrong and William C. Handy that he created on behalf of the American Negro Commemorative Society were put on display at Texas Southern University in February 1971.In 1968, Calabro created a medal of Babe Ruth for the National Commemorative Society, created after studying numerous pictures of the baseball player. The medal was struck by the Franklin Mint in silver, in addition to a single example minted for the Smithsonian Institution in platinum.

Kalervo Kallio

Niilo Kalervo Kallio (28 March 1909 – 2 November 1969) was a Finnish sculptor. He was the son of the fourth President of Finland Kyösti Kallio.Kallio's most famous works are the memorial statue of his father, located in Helsinki, and the bust of the 35th Vice President of the United States Alben W. Barkley. The bust is placed at the United States Senate Vice Presidential Bust Collection in Washington, D.C..

List of Vice Presidents of the United States

There have been 48 vice presidents of the United States since the office came into existence in 1789. Originally, the vice president was the person who received the second most votes for president in the Electoral College. However, in the election of 1800 a tie in the electoral college between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr led to the selection of the president by the House of Representatives. To prevent such an event from happening again, the Twelfth Amendment was added to the Constitution, creating the current system where electors cast a separate ballot for the vice presidency.The vice president is the first person in the presidential line of succession and assumes that presidency if the president dies, resigns, or is impeached and removed from office. Nine vice presidents have ascended to the presidency in this way: eight (John Tyler, Millard Fillmore, Andrew Johnson, Chester A. Arthur, Theodore Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge, Harry S. Truman and Lyndon B. Johnson) through the president's death and one (Gerald Ford) through the president's resignation. In addition, the vice president serves as the president of the Senate and may choose to cast a tie-breaking vote on decisions made by the Senate. Vice presidents have exercised this latter power to varying extents over the years.Prior to adoption of the Twenty-fifth Amendment in 1967, an intra-term vacancy in the office of the vice president could not be filled until the next post-election inauguration. Several such vacancies occurred—seven vice presidents died, one resigned and eight succeeded to the presidency. This amendment allowed for a vacancy to be filled through appointment by the president and confirmation by both chambers of the Congress. Since its ratification, the vice presidency has been vacant twice (both in the context of scandals surrounding the Nixon administration) and was filled both times through this process, namely in 1973 following Spiro Agnew's resignation, and again in 1974 after Gerald Ford succeeded to the presidency. The amendment also established a procedure whereby a vice president may, if the president is unable to discharge the powers and duties of the office, temporarily assume the powers and duties of the office as acting president. George H. W. Bush did so once on July 13, 1985. Dick Cheney did so twice on June 29, 2002 and on July 21, 2007.

The persons who have served as vice president were born in or primarily affiliated with 27 states plus the District of Columbia. New York has produced the most of any state as eight have been born there and three others considered it their home state. Most vice presidents have been in their 50s or 60s and had political experience prior to assuming the office. The youngest person to become vice president was John C. Breckinridge at 36 years of age while the oldest was Alben W. Barkley at 71 years of age. Two vice presidents—George Clinton and John C. Calhoun—served under more than one president.

There are currently five living former vice presidents. The most recent former vice president to die was George H. W. Bush on November 30, 2018.

Major General John A. Logan

Major General John A. Logan, also known as the General John A. Logan Monument and Logan Circle Monument, is an equestrian statue in Washington, D.C. that honors politician and Civil War general John A. Logan. The monument is sited in the center of Logan Circle, a traffic circle and public park in the Logan Circle neighborhood. The statue was sculpted by artist Franklin Simmons, whose other prominent works include the Peace Monument and statues in the National Statuary Hall Collection. The architect of the statue base was Richard Morris Hunt, designer of prominent buildings including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and The Breakers in Newport, Rhode Island. Prominent attendees at the dedication ceremony in 1901 included President William McKinley, members of his cabinet, Senator Chauncey Depew, Senator Shelby Moore Cullom, and General Grenville M. Dodge.

The sculpture is one of eighteen Civil War monuments in Washington, D.C., which were collectively listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. The bronze sculpture rests on a bronze and granite base adorned with two reliefs depicting historically inaccurate moments in Logan's life. The monument and surrounding park are owned and maintained by the National Park Service, a federal agency of the Interior Department.

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