United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs

The United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs is the chief oversight committee of the United States Senate. It has jurisdiction over matters related to the Department of Homeland Security and other homeland security concerns, as well as the functioning of the government itself, including the National Archives, budget and accounting measures other than appropriations, the Census, the federal civil service, the affairs of the District of Columbia and the United States Postal Service. It was called the United States Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs before homeland security was added to its responsibilities in 2004.[1] It serves as the Senate's chief investigative and oversight committee. Its chair is the only Senate committee chair who can issue subpoenas without a committee vote.

U.S. Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee Chairman Joe Lieberman and Ranking Member Susan Collins address bipartisan suggestion on countermeasures toward domestic terrorism
In 2011, U.S. Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee then-Chairman Joe Lieberman and then-Ranking Member Susan Collins address bipartisan suggestion on countermeasures toward domestic terrorism and Jihadist extremism in the United States

History

While elements of the Committee can be traced back into the 19th century, its modern origins began with the creation of the Committee on Expenditures in the Executive Departments on April 18, 1921. The Committee on Expenditures in the Executive Department was renamed the Committee on Government Operations in 1952, which was reorganized as the Committee on Governmental Affairs in 1978. After passage of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorist Prevention Act of 2004, the Committee became the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and added homeland security to its jurisdiction.[1]

U.S. Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee Chairman Joe Lieberman and Ranking Member Susan Collins talk with FEMA Administrator R. David Paulison
Committee Chairman Joe Lieberman and Ranking Member Susan Collins talk with FEMA Administrator R. David Paulison

Of the five current subcommittees, the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations is the oldest and most storied, having been created at the same time as the Committee on Government Operations in 1952. The Subcommittee on the Oversight of Government Management, the Federal Workforce, and the District of Columbia was established after the creation of the Committee on Governmental Affairs in 1978. The Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services and International Security was created in 2003.

Two ad hoc subcommittees were established in January 2007 to reflect the Committee's expanded homeland security jurisdiction. They were the Subcommittee on Disaster Recovery and the Subcommittee on State, Local, and Private Sector Preparedness and Integration. The Subcommittee on Contracting was added in 2009. In 2011, the Disaster and State, Local, and Private Sector subcommittees were merged to form the Subcommittee on Disaster Recovery and Intergovernmental Affairs.

Over the years, the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and its predecessors have dealt with a number of important issues, including government accountability, Congressional ethics, regulatory affairs, and systems and information security. In 2003, after the Homeland Security Act of 2002 established the Department of Homeland Security, the Committee adopted primary oversight of the creation and subsequent policies, operations, and actions of the Department.

In the past decade, the committee has focused particularly on the Department of Homeland Security's ability to respond to a major catastrophe, such as Hurricane Katrina; the rise of homegrown terrorism in the United States; and the vulnerabilities of the nation's most critical networks, those operating systems upon which our national defense, economy, and way of life depend, such as the power grid, water treatment facilities, transportation and financial networks, nuclear reactors, and dams.[1]

In February 2014, staff working for committee ranking member Senator Tom Coburn issued a report raising concerns that some passwords protecting highly sensitive government data “wouldn’t pass muster for even the most basic civilian email account.”[2]

Members, 116th Congress

Majority Minority

Members, 115th Congress

Majority Minority

Source[3]

Subcommittees

Subcommittee Chair Ranking Member
Investigations (Permanent) Rob Portman (R-OH) Tom Carper (D-DE)
Federal Spending Oversight and Emergency Management Rand Paul (R-KY) Gary Peters (D-MI)
Regulatory Affairs and Federal Management James Lankford (R-OK) Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND)

Chairmen

Committee on Expenditures in Executive Departments, 1921–1952

Committee on Government Operations, 1952–1977

Committee on Governmental Affairs, 1977–2005

Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, 2005–present

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs official website
  2. ^ Brown, Alex (February 4, 2014). "The Incredibly Dumb Way the Government Is Guarding Top-Secret Data". NationalJournal.com. National Journal Group Inc. Retrieved February 8, 2014.
  3. ^ "U.S. Senate: Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs". www.senate.gov. Retrieved January 8, 2017.
  4. ^ a b Gorenstein, Nathan (November 5, 1986). "Biden would rather see Kennedy in Judiciary chair". The News Journal. Wilmington, Delaware. p. 8 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ a b Barton, Paul (March 26, 1995). "Senator Glenn Rails at New Ways". The Cincinnati Enquirer. p. 21 – via Newspapers.com.

External links

An Act to eliminate the 2013 statutory pay adjustment for Federal employees

An act to eliminate the 2013 statutory pay adjustment for Federal employees (H.R. 273) is a bill that was introduced into and passed by the United States House of Representatives in the 113th United States Congress. It was introduced by Rep. Ron DeSantis (R-FL) on January 15, 2013 and it passed the House with a vote of 261-154 on February 15, 2013.The bill would prevent a 0.5% pay increase for all federal workers from taking effect, continuing a pay freeze that has been in effect since 2011. According to the Congressional Budget Office, this measure would save the federal government $11 billion over 10 years.

Committee on Government Operations

Committee on Government Operations may refer to:

United States House Committee on Government Operations, defunct committee whose function is currently within purview of the United States House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform

United States Senate Committee on Government Operations, defunct committee whose function is currently within purview of the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs

Congressional Award Program Reauthorization Act of 2013

The Congressional Award Program Reauthorization Act of 2013 (S. 1348) is a bill that was introduced into the United States Senate during the 113th United States Congress. The bill would reauthorize the Congressional Award Act of 1979 by once again extending the scheduled date of termination until 2018. The Congressional Award Program recognizes excellence in public service and personal development among young people. The program gives awards to Americans between the ages of 14–23 years old for achieving goals they individually set in four areas: Volunteer Public Service, Personal Development, Physical Fitness, and Expedition/Exploration.

Daveed Gartenstein-Ross

Daveed Gartenstein-Ross is an American counter-terrorism scholar and analyst. In 2014 he became the CEO of Valens Global, a private company that consults on counter-terrorism, Al-Qaeda, ISIS, ISIL, other insurgent groups and violent nonstate actors. In addition to his role at Valens Global, Mr. Gartenstein-Ross is the Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, a Washington-based think tank. He frequently consults on counter-terrorism for various government agencies as well as the private sector. In 2011, Gartenstein-Ross wrote Bin Laden's Legacy: Why We're Still Losing the War on Terror published by John Wiley & Sons.

Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2014

The Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2014 (DATA Act) is a law that aims to make information on federal expenditures more easily accessible and transparent. The law requires the U.S. Department of the Treasury to establish common standards for financial data provided by all government agencies and to expand the amount of data that agencies must provide to the government website, USASpending. The goal of the law is to improve the ability of Americans to track and understand how the government is spending their tax dollars.The law was introduced into the United States Senate during the 113th United States Congress. A similar bill, the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2013 (H.R. 2061; 113th Congress), was introduced at the same time in the United States House of Representatives. There was also a previous version of the bill (H.R. 2146) that passed in the House during the 112th United States Congress, but did not become law. On May 9, 2014, President Barack Obama signed this version of the bill into law.

Dirksen Senate Office Building

The Dirksen Senate Office Building is the second office building constructed for members of the United States Senate in Washington, D.C., and was named for the late Minority Leader Everett Dirksen from Illinois in 1972.

Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2014

The Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2014 (S. 2648) is a bill that would appropriate supplemental funds for FY2014 to specified federal agencies and programs to respond to the increased apprehensions of unaccompanied children and minors along the southwestern border, fight wildfires, and support Israel's Iron Dome anti-missile defense system. The bill would provide $2.7 billion in supplemental funding.The bill was introduced into the United States Senate during the 113th United States Congress. The House bill "Making supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2014 (H.R. 5230; 113th Congress)" is intended to address the same issues as this one.

FOR VETS Act of 2013

The Formerly Owned Resources for Veterans to Express Thanks for Service Act of 2013 or FOR VETS Act of 2013 (H.R. 1171) is an act of the 113th United States Congress. The bill changed federal law so that additional Veterans Service Organizations became eligible for free goods and equipment through the Federal Surplus Personal Property Donation Program run by the General Services Administration (GSA). The program takes overstock or excess items, working equipment that is being replaced, and so forth that belongs to the federal government and makes it cheaply available to various nonprofit groups. The FOR VETS Act of 2010 was intended to make this equipment available to Veterans Service Organizations for free, but a wording error limited free equipment only to VSOs working on education of public health. This bill is meant to correct the previous mistake.

Federal Disaster Assistance Nonprofit Fairness Act of 2013

The Federal Disaster Assistance Nonprofit Fairness Act of 2013 (H.R. 592) is a bill that passed in the United States House of Representatives during the 113th United States Congress. The bill would make religious organizations and religious non-profits eligible to receive federal funding for repairs and rebuilding of their facilities after a major disaster. The bill amends the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act.

The bill passed the House by a large margin, but was criticized by opponents for using taxpayer money to help tax-exempt organizations and for violating the principle of separation of church and state.

Federal Information Security Modernization Act of 2014

The Federal Information Security Modernization Act of 2014 (Pub.L. 113-283, S. 2521; commonly referred to as FISMA Reform) was signed into federal law by President Barack Obama on December 18, 2014. Passed as a response to the increasing amount of cyber attacks on the federal government, it amended existing laws to enable the federal government to better respond to cyber attacks on departments and agencies.An earlier version of the legislation was proposed by House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Darrell Issa and co-sponsored by the Committee's Ranking Member Elijah Cummins as H.R.1163 Federal Information Security Amendments Act of 2013. The bill was passed the U.S. House of Representatives on a vote of 416-0.The final version of the legislation was introduced to the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs by Thomas Carper (D–DE) on June 24, 2014 and passed December 8, 2014 in the Senate and December 10, 2014 in the House.

GAO Access and Oversight Act of 2017

The GAO Access and Oversight Act of 2017 (Pub.L. 115–3,H.R. 72) was one of the first Acts of the 115th United States Congress to be signed into law by President Donald Trump during the first 100 days of his presidency. It was introduced in the United States House of Representatives on January 3, 2017 by Representative Buddy Carter of Georgia. The bill which was signed by Trump on January 31, 2017, ensures that the Government Accountability Office (GAO) has full access to the National Directory of New Hires, a database created by Congress in 1996 to audit recent job hires mainly to assist agencies at the state level with child support enforcement. According to Congress, 115-3 will enable the GAO to ensure that recipients of federal means-tested programs like Unemployment Insurance, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Earned income tax credit (EITC), and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) are eligible.

The bill passed the House on January 4, 2017. It was then considered in the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs before being passed in the Senate on January 17, 2017.

Gold Star Fathers Act of 2014

The Gold Star Fathers Act of 2014 (S. 2323) is a bill that would expand preferred eligibility for federal jobs to the fathers of certain permanently disabled or deceased veterans. The mothers of such veterans already have federal hiring preference.The bill was introduced into the United States Senate during the 113th United States Congress.

Homeland Security Committee

Homeland Security Committee can refer to:

United States House Committee on Homeland Security

United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs

Homeland security

Homeland security is an American national security umbrella term for "the national effort to ensure a homeland that is safe, secure, and resilient against terrorism and other hazards where American interests, aspirations, and ways of life can thrive to the national effort to prevent terrorist attacks within the United States, reduce the vulnerability of the U.S. to terrorism, and minimize the damage from attacks that do occur". According to an official work published by the Congressional Research Service in 2013 the "Homeland security" term's definition has varied over time.Homeland security is not constrained to terrorist incidents. Terrorism is one of many threats that endanger society. Within the U.S., an all-hazards approach exists regarding homeland security endeavors. In this sense, homeland security encompasses both natural disasters and man-made events. Thus, the domain of homeland security must accommodate a plethora of situations and scenarios, ranging from natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Katrina, Irma) to acts of terrorism (e.g., Boston Marathon bombing,World Trade Center Bombing).The term came about following enactment of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and reorganization of many U.S. government civil agencies effective March 1, 2003, to form the United States Department of Homeland Security after the September 11 attacks, and may be used to refer to the actions of that department, the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, or the United States House of Representatives Committee on Homeland Security.

Homeland defense (HD) is the military protection of U.S. territory, sovereignty, domestic population, and critical infrastructure against external threats and aggression.

Mark Greenblatt

Mark L. Greenblatt is an American attorney and government official. Currently serving as the Assistant Inspector General for Investigations at the United States Department of Commerce, he has been nominated by President Donald Trump to become Inspector General for the United States Department of the Interior.

Mubin Shaikh

Mubin Shaikh is a former security intelligence and counter terrorism operative and now an expert with experience in radicalization, deradicalization, countering violent extremism (CVE), and national security and counter-terrorism. Based on his history and former involvement, he has testified as an expert for the United Nations Security Council, the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs with NATO, the National Counterterrorism Center, and Special Operations Command Central and he is an external expert with the Joint Staff SMA for CENTCOM Command Staff.He has also appeared on media outlets such as CNN, CBC, ABC, and NBC on matters related to extremism and terrorism.

United States Senate Committee on the Census

The United States Senate Select Committee on the Tenth Census was created in 1878. It continued to operate until 1887, when it became the United States Senate Committee on the Census. The Committee was abolished in 1921. Issues related to the U.S. Census and the U.S. Census Bureau are now under the jurisdiction of the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

United States Senate Homeland Security Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations

The Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations (PSI), stood up in March 1941 as the "Truman Committee," is the oldest subcommittee of the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs (formerly the Committee on Government Operations).

WMD Intelligence and Information Sharing Act of 2013

The WMD Intelligence and Information Sharing Act of 2013 (H.R. 1542) is a bill that would "amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish weapons of mass destruction intelligence and information sharing functions of the Office of Intelligence and Analysis of the Department of Homeland Security and to require dissemination of information analyzed by the Department to entities with responsibilities relating to homeland security." This intelligence gathering would include not only chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats, but also the analysis of potential threats to public health or U.S. agriculture. The bill would expand The bill passed the United States House of Representatives during the 113th United States Congress and was referred to the United States Senate.

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