United States Secretary of Transportation

The United States Secretary of Transportation is the head of the United States Department of Transportation, a member of the President's Cabinet, and fourteenth in the Presidential Line of Succession.[2] The post was created with the formation of the Department of Transportation on October 15, 1966, by President Lyndon B. Johnson's signing of the Department of Transportation Act.[3] The department's mission is "to develop and coordinate policies that will provide an efficient and economical national transportation system, with due regard for need, the environment, and the national defense."[3] The Secretary of Transportation oversees eleven agencies, including the Federal Aviation Administration, the Federal Highway Administration, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.[3] In April 2008, Mary Peters launched the official blog of the Secretary of Transportation called The Fast Lane.[4]

The first Secretary of Transportation was Alan Stephenson Boyd, nominated to the post by Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson. Ronald Reagan's second Secretary of Transportation, Elizabeth Dole, was the first female holder, and Mary Peters was the second. Gerald Ford's nominee William Thaddeus Coleman, Jr. was the first African American to serve as Transportation Secretary, and Federico Peña, serving under Bill Clinton, was the first Hispanic to hold the position, subsequently becoming Secretary of Energy. Japanese-American Norman Mineta, who had previously been Secretary of Commerce, is the longest-serving Secretary, holding the post for over five and a half years,[3] and Andrew Card is the shortest-serving Secretary, serving only eleven months. Neil Goldschmidt was the youngest secretary, taking office at age thirty nine, while Norman Mineta was the oldest, retiring at age seventy four.[5] On January 23, 2009, the sixteenth secretary Ray LaHood took office, serving under the administration of Democrat Barack Obama; he had previously been a Republican Congressman from Illinois for fourteen years.[6] The salary of the Secretary of Transportation is $199,700.[7]

Anthony Foxx was the 17th US Secretary of Transportation from 2013-2017, when Barack Obama was President. Elaine Chao, who served as Secretary of Labor under President George W. Bush, was nominated by Donald Trump on November 29, 2016. On January 31, 2017, the Senate confirmed her appointment by a vote of 93-6.

United States Secretary of Transportation
Seal of the United States Department of Transportation
Seal of the Department
Flag of the United States Secretary of Transportation
Flag of the Secretary
Elaine Chao official portrait 2 (cropped)
Incumbent
Elaine Chao

since January 31, 2017
United States Department of Transportation
StyleMadam Secretary
Member ofCabinet
Reports toPresident of the United States
SeatWashington, D.C.
AppointerThe President
with Senate advice and consent
Term lengthNo fixed term
Constituting instrument49 U.S.C. § 102
FormationOctober 15, 1966
First holderAlan Stephenson Boyd
SuccessionFourteenth[1]
DeputyDeputy Secretary of Transportation
SalaryExecutive Schedule, level I
Websitewww.transportation.gov

List of Secretaries of Transportation

Parties

  Democratic (7)   Republican (11)

No. Image Name State of Residence Took office Left office President
serving under
1 Alan stephenson boyd Alan S. Boyd Florida January 16, 1967 January 20, 1969 Lyndon B. Johnson
2 Volpe John A. Volpe Massachusetts January 22, 1969 February 2, 1973 Richard M. Nixon
3 Claude S. Brinegar official photo (cropped) Claude S. Brinegar California February 2, 1973 February 1, 1975
Gerald R. Ford
4 William thaddeus coleman William T. Coleman, Jr. Pennsylvania March 7, 1975 January 20, 1977
5 Brock Adams Brock Adams Washington January 23, 1977 July 20, 1979 Jimmy Carter
6 Neil Goldschmidt Neil E. Goldschmidt Oregon August 15, 1979 January 20, 1981
7 Drew lewis Drew Lewis Pennsylvania January 23, 1981 February 1, 1983 Ronald Reagan
8 ElizabethDole Elizabeth H. Dole Kansas February 7, 1983 September 30, 1987
9 James burnley IV James H. Burnley IV North Carolina December 3, 1987 January 20, 1989
10 Samuel Knox Skinner Samuel K. Skinner Illinois February 6, 1989 December 13, 1991 George H. W. Bush
11 Andrew Card award crop Andrew H. Card Massachusetts February 24, 1992 January 20, 1993
12 Federico pena Federico Peña Colorado January 21, 1993 February 14, 1997 Bill Clinton
13 Slater rodney Rodney E. Slater Arkansas February 14, 1997 January 20, 2001
14 Norman Mineta, official portrait, DOT Norman Y. Mineta California January 25, 2001 August 7, 2006 George W. Bush
15 Mary Peters official DOT portrait Mary E. Peters Arizona October 17, 2006 January 20, 2009
16 Ray LaHood official DOT portrait Ray H. LaHood Illinois January 23, 2009 July 2, 2013 Barack Obama
17 Anthony Foxx official portrait Anthony R. Foxx North Carolina July 2, 2013 January 20, 2017
Michael Huerta official picture Michael Huerta
Acting
California January 20, 2017 January 31, 2017 Donald Trump
18 Elaine Chao official portrait 2 (cropped) Elaine Chao Kentucky January 31, 2017 present

Line of succession

The line of succession regarding who would act as Secretary of Transportation in the event of a vacancy or incapacitation is as follows:[8]

  1. Deputy Secretary of Transportation
  2. Under Secretary of Transportation for Policy
  3. General Counsel
  4. Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs
  5. Assistant Secretary for Transportation Policy
  6. Assistant Secretary for Governmental Affairs
  7. Assistant Secretary for Aviation and International Affairs
  8. Assistant Secretary for Administration
  9. Administrator of the Federal Highway Administration
  10. Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration
  11. Administrator of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
  12. Administrator of the Federal Railroad Administration
  13. Administrator of the Federal Transit Administration
  14. Administrator of the Maritime Administration
  15. Administrator of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  16. Administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  17. Administrator of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration
  18. Administrator of the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation
  19. Regional Administrator, Southern Region, Federal Aviation Administration
  20. Director, Resource Center, Lakewood, Colorado, Federal Highway Administration
  21. Regional Administrator, Northwest Mountain Region, Federal Aviation Administration

Living former Secretaries of Transportation

As of April 2019, there are twelve living, former Secretaries of Transportation (with all Secretaries that have served since 1983 still living), the oldest being Alan S. Boyd (served 1967–1969, born 1922). The most recent Secretary of Transportation to die was William T. Coleman, Jr. (served 1975–1977, born 1920) on March 31, 2017. The most recently serving Secretary of Transportation to die was Andrew L. Lewis (served 1981–1983, born 1931), who died on February 10, 2016.

Name Term Date of birth (and age)
Alan S. Boyd 1967–1969 July 20, 1922 (age 96)
Neil Goldschmidt 1979–1981 June 16, 1940 (age 78)
Elizabeth H. Dole 1983–1987 July 29, 1936 (age 82)
James H. Burnley IV 1987–1989 July 30, 1948 (age 70)
Samuel K. Skinner 1989–1991 June 10, 1938 (age 80)
Andrew Card 1992–1993 May 10, 1947 (age 71)
Federico Peña 1993–1997 March 15, 1947 (age 72)
Rodney E. Slater 1997–2001 February 23, 1955 (age 64)
Norman Mineta 2001–2006 November 12, 1931 (age 87)
Mary Peters 2006–2009 December 4, 1948 (age 70)
Ray LaHood 2009–2013 December 6, 1945 (age 73)
Anthony Foxx 2013–2017 April 30, 1971 (age 47)

References

General
  • "Biographical Sketches of the Secretaries of Transportation". U.S. Department of Transportation. August 14, 2009. Archived from the original on March 16, 2011. Retrieved January 2, 2010.
Specific
  1. ^ https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/3/19
  2. ^ "3 U.S.C.". Legal Information Institute. Cornell University Law School. External link in |title= (help); Missing or empty |url= (help)
  3. ^ a b c d Grinder, R. Dale. "The United States Department of Transportation: A Brief History". U.S. Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on July 17, 2004. Retrieved January 2, 2010.
  4. ^ "A Chronology of Dates Significant in the Background, History and Development of the Department of Transportation". U.S. Department of Transportation. August 14, 2009. Archived from the original on February 15, 2008. Retrieved January 3, 2010.
  5. ^ "Biographical Sketches of the Secretaries of Transportation". U.S. Department of Transportation. August 14, 2009. Archived from the original on March 16, 2011. Retrieved January 3, 2010.
  6. ^ "Ray LaHood—Secretary of Transportation". U.S. Department of Transportation. July 22, 2009. Retrieved January 3, 2010.
  7. ^ "Salary Table No. 2010—Ex". U.S. Office of Personnel Management. Retrieved January 3, 2010.
    "5 U.S.C.". Legal Information Institute. Cornell University Law School. External link in |title= (help); Missing or empty |url= (help)
  8. ^ Obama, Barack (January 14, 2009). "Executive Order 13485: Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of Transportation". NASA Online Directives Information System. Retrieved January 2, 2010.

External links

U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Ben Carson
as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
Order of Precedence of the United States
as Secretary of Transportation
Succeeded by
Rick Perry
as Secretary of Energy
1984 Republican National Convention

The 1984 National Convention of the Republican Party of the United States convened on August 20 to August 23, 1984, at Dallas Convention Center in downtown Dallas, Texas. The convention nominated President Ronald W. Reagan and Vice President George H. W. Bush for reelection.

It was the thirty-third GOP presidential nominating convention, the first Republican convention held in Texas (the first Republican convention in the South outside Florida), and the only convention of either party held in Dallas.

Reagan's popularity had rebounded after the early 1980s recession, and he became the first incumbent president since Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 to run without serious opposition in the primary. The keynote address on August 20 was delivered by Katherine Ortega, Treasurer of the United States. Other speakers included Elizabeth Dole, United States Secretary of Transportation; Jeane Kirkpatrick, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations (who delivered her now-famous "Blame America First" speech ); and Representative Jack Kemp of Buffalo, New York.

The convention also included a valedictory address by retiring U.S. Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona. Goldwater was widely credited as the political founder of the New Right in the United States, of which Reagan was the political heir, and Reagan had gained notice for his "A Time for Choosing" speech supporting Goldwater in October 1964. Vice President George H.W. Bush gave a powerful address, some believing it debuted him as the de facto nominee of the GOP in 1988. President Reagan spoke after, and addressed the nation and the party on the future and highlighted the "Morning in America". Country singer Lee Greenwood was also featured, and sang "God Bless the USA," which had been released earlier that year.

2013 Charlotte mayoral election

The biennial Charlotte mayoral election was held on Tuesday, November 5, 2013. Primary elections were held on Tuesday, September 10, 2013. Unaffiliated voters were allowed to vote in either the Democratic or Republican primary.

On July 2, 2013, Anthony Foxx, a Democrat, announced that he would resign as mayor to become United States Secretary of Transportation. District 1 city councilperson Patsy Kinsey, also a Democrat, was named interim mayor the same day with the understanding that she would not stand in the mayoral election in November. Kinsey instead ran to regain the council seat she had vacated.

Democratic Party nominee Patrick Cannon, another member of the city council, won the general election to become the 55th mayor of Charlotte. However, only under four months into his term, on March 26, 2014, Cannon was arrested by the FBI on charges of accepting bribes (to which he later pleaded guilty) and resigned later that day, prompting the City Council to elect Dan Clodfelter to serve for the remainder of Cannon's term as the 57th Mayor of Charlotte.

Alan Stephenson Boyd

Alan Stephenson Boyd (born July 20, 1922) is an American attorney and transportation executive who led several large corporations and also served the U.S. Government in various transportation-related positions. He was the first United States Secretary of Transportation, appointed by Lyndon Johnson. Additionally, he served in executive positions with the Civil Aeronautics Board, the U.S. Department of Commerce, and was a president of Amtrak. Boyd is the second oldest living former U.S. Cabinet member, surpassed by George P. Shultz, and one of only two living members of Johnson's Cabinet, along with Ramsey Clark.

Andrew Card

Andrew Hill Card Jr. (born May 10, 1947) is an American politician who was White House Chief of Staff under President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2006, as well as head of Bush's White House Iraq Group. Card served as United States Secretary of Transportation under President George H. W. Bush from 1992 to 1993.

Card announced his resignation as Chief of Staff on March 28, 2006, effective April 14, 2006. Card was the Acting Dean of The Bush School of Government and Public Service, at Texas A&M University while Ryan Crocker fulfilled his U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan responsibilities before stepping down in July 2013.

In 2014, he became the president of Franklin Pierce University in Rindge, New Hampshire, serving until he retired from that post in the summer of 2016.

Andrew L. Lewis Jr.

Andrew Lindsay "Drew" Lewis Jr. (November 3, 1931 – February 10, 2016) was an American businessman and politician from the state of Pennsylvania. He was United States Secretary of Transportation in the first portion of the administration of U.S. President Ronald W. Reagan, and is best known for presiding over the firing of the striking U.S. air traffic controllers in 1981.

Anthony Foxx

Anthony Renard Foxx (born April 30, 1971) is an American politician and lawyer who served as the United States Secretary of Transportation from 2013 to 2017. Previously, he served as the Mayor of Charlotte, North Carolina, from 2009 to 2013. He is a member of the Democratic Party. First elected to the Charlotte City Council in 2005, upon his 2009 mayoral victory he became the youngest mayor of Charlotte and the second African American mayor.President Barack Obama nominated Foxx to be the Secretary of Transportation in April 2013, and he was confirmed by a 100-0 vote in June 2013.

Brock Adams

Brockman "Brock" Adams (January 13, 1927 – September 10, 2004) was an American politician and member of Congress. Adams was a Democrat from Washington and served as a U.S. Representative, Senator, and United States Secretary of Transportation before retiring in January 1993.

Claude Brinegar

Claude Stout Brinegar (December 16, 1926 – March 13, 2009) was the third United States Secretary of Transportation, serving from February 2, 1973, to February 1, 1975. Holding a PhD from Stanford University in economic research, Brinegar had previously been an oil company executive. Brinegar was Secretary of Transportation during the 1973 oil crisis.

Federico Peña

Federico Fabian Peña (born March 15, 1947) is an American attorney who was the United States Secretary of Transportation from 1993 to 1997 and United States Secretary of Energy from 1997 to 1998, during the presidency of Bill Clinton.

John Volpe

John Anthony Volpe (; December 8, 1908 – November 11, 1994) was an American diplomat, politician and member of the Republican Party who served as the 61st and 63rd Governor of Massachusetts from 1961 to 1963 and 1965 to 1969, as the United States Secretary of Transportation from 1969 to 1973 and as the United States Ambassador to Italy from 1973 to 1977.

Marilyn Lewis

Marilyn Stoughton Lewis (born July 19, 1931) is a Republican former member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives.She is the widow of Andrew L. Lewis, Jr., a businessman who was the 1974 Republican gubernatorial nominee and the United States Secretary of Transportation from 1981 to 1983 in the administration of U.S. President Ronald W. Reagan.

Mary E. Peters

Mary E. Peters (born December 4, 1948) served as the United States Secretary of Transportation under President George W. Bush from 2006 to 2009. She was the second woman to hold the position after Elizabeth Dole.

Mary Peters

Mary Peters may refer to:

Mary Peters (athlete) (born 1939), British athlete

Mary Peters (hymn writer) (1813–1856), British hymn writer

Mary Peters (1852–1921), indigenous Oregon woman and ferry operator

Mary E. Peters (born 1948), American politician, 15th United States Secretary of Transportation

Mary Peters Fieser (1909–1997), née Mary Peters, American chemist

Mary Ann Peters (born 1951), American ambassador to Bangladesh

Mineta Transportation Institute

The Mineta Transportation Institute is a research institute focusing on issues related to intermodal surface transportation in the United States. Although part of San Jose State University's Lucas Graduate School of Business in San Jose, California, the headquarters is located at 210 N 4th Street, San Jose and is currently directed by Karen Philbrick. It is named after its founder Norman Y. Mineta, the 14th United States Secretary of Transportation.

Norman Mineta

Norman Yoshio Mineta (born November 12, 1931) is an American politician. A member of the Democratic Party, Mineta most recently served in President George W. Bush's Cabinet as the United States Secretary of Transportation, the only Democratic Cabinet Secretary in the Bush administration. On June 23, 2006, Mineta announced his resignation after more than five years as Secretary of Transportation, effective July 7, 2006, making him the longest-serving Transportation Secretary in the Department's history. On July 10, 2006, Hill & Knowlton, a public relations firm, announced that Mineta would join it as a partner. On August 10, 2010, it was announced that Mineta would join L&L Energy, Inc as Vice Chairman.

Mineta also served as President Bill Clinton's Secretary of Commerce for the last six months of his term (July 2000–January 2001). With the exception of a span of five days between the end of Clinton's term and Bush's appointments, Mineta spent nearly six full years as a Cabinet member.

Ray LaHood

Ray H. LaHood (born December 6, 1945) is an American politician who served as United States Secretary of Transportation from 2009 until 2013. A Republican from Illinois, LaHood represented Illinois's 18th congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1995 to 2009. In 2015, LaHood's book, Seeking Bipartisanship: My Life in Politics, coauthored with Frank H. Mackaman of The Dirksen Congressional Center, was published by Cambria Press.

Rodney E. Slater

For the British Musician, see Rodney Slater (musician).Rodney Earl Slater (born February 23, 1955) was the United States Secretary of Transportation under U.S. President Bill Clinton.

United States Department of Transportation

The United States Department of Transportation (USDOT or DOT) is a federal Cabinet department of the U.S. government concerned with transportation. It was established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, and began operation on April 1, 1967. It is governed by the United States Secretary of Transportation.

William Thaddeus Coleman Jr.

William Thaddeus Coleman Jr. (July 7, 1920 – March 31, 2017) was an American attorney and politician. Coleman was the fourth United States Secretary of Transportation, from March 7, 1975, to January 20, 1977, and the second African American to serve in the United States Cabinet. As an attorney, Coleman played a major role in significant civil rights cases. At the time of his death, Coleman was the oldest living former Cabinet member.

United States Secretaries of Transportation
Deputy Secretary of Transportation
Under Secretary of Transportation for Policy
Current
Past

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