United States Secretary of Health and Human Services

The United States Secretary of Health and Human Services is the head of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, concerned with health matters. The Secretary is a member of the President's Cabinet. The office was formerly Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare.

In 1980, the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare was renamed the Department of Health and Human Services, and its education functions and Rehabilitation Services Administration were transferred to the new Department of Education.[2] Patricia Roberts Harris headed the department before and after it was renamed.[3]

Nominations to the office of Secretary of HHS are referred to the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee and the Finance Committee, which has jurisdiction over Medicare and Medicaid,[4] before confirmation is considered by the full United States Senate.

Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act the role of the Secretary has been greatly expanded.[5][6]

Donald Trump selected then-Congressman Tom Price to be the 23rd Secretary of the Health and Human Services Department. Price was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on February 10, 2017 and resigned on September 29, 2017.[7] Trump then named Don J. Wright, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health and Director of the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, as acting Secretary until Deputy Secretary Eric Hargan was sworn in on October 10, 2017. On November 13, 2017, Trump nominated former pharmaceutical executive Alex Azar to fill the position permanently. Azar's confirmation hearing before the Senate Finance Committee took place on January 9, 2018,[8] and on January 24, 2018, Azar was confirmed by the U.S. Senate by a vote of 55 to 43.[9] Azar was sworn in on January 29, 2018.[10]

United States Secretary of Health and Human Services
Seal of the United States Department of Health and Human Services
Seal of the Department
Flag of the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services
Flag of the Secretary
Alex Azar official portrait (cropped)
Incumbent
Alex Azar

since January 29, 2018
United States Department of Health and Human Services
StyleMr. Secretary
Member ofCabinet
Reports toPresident of the United States
SeatHubert H. Humphrey Building, Washington, D.C.
AppointerThe President
with Senate advice and consent
Term lengthNo fixed term
Constituting instrumentReorganization Plan No. 1 of 1953
67 Stat. 631
42 U.S.C. § 3501
PrecursorSecretary of Health, Education, and Welfare
FormationAugust 3, 1979
First holderPatricia Roberts Harris
SuccessionTwelfth[1]
DeputyDeputy Secretary of Health and Human Services
SalaryExecutive Schedule, level I
Websitewww.hhs.gov

Duties

Flag of the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare
The flag of the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, the predecessor to the Secretary of Health and Human Services.

The duties of the secretary revolve around human conditions and concerns in the United States. This includes advising the president on matters of health, welfare, and income security programs. The Secretary strives to administer the Department of Health and Human Services to carry out approved programs and make the public aware of the objectives of the department.[11]

The Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) was reorganized into a Department of Education and a Department of Health and Human Services (US DHHS).

The Department of Health and Human Services oversees 11 agencies including the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for Disease Control (CDC), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Administration for Children and Families (ACF) and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).[12]

List of Secretaries of Health and Human Services

Parties

  Democratic (8)   Republican (15)   Independent (1)

Secretaries of Health, Education, and Welfare

No. Portrait Name State of residence Took office Left office President(s)
1 Hobby-Oveta-Culp Oveta Culp Hobby Texas April 11, 1953 July 31, 1955 Dwight D. Eisenhower
2 Folsom Marion B. Folsom New York August 2, 1955 July 31, 1958
3 ArthurSFlemming Arthur S. Flemming Ohio August 1, 1958 January 19, 1961
4 Ribicoff Abraham A. Ribicoff Connecticut January 21, 1961 July 13, 1962 John F. Kennedy
5 Celebrez Anthony J. Celebrezze Ohio July 31, 1962 August 17, 1965
Lyndon B. Johnson
6 John W. Gardner, U.S. Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare John W. Gardner California August 18, 1965 March 1, 1968
7 Wilburportrait Wilbur J. Cohen Michigan May 16, 1968 January 20, 1969
8 RobertHFinch Robert H. Finch California January 21, 1969 June 23, 1970 Richard Nixon
9 ElliotLeeRichardson Elliot L. Richardson Massachusetts June 24, 1970 January 29, 1973
10 Caspar Weinberger official photo Caspar W. Weinberger California February 12, 1973 August 8, 1975
Gerald Ford
11 F. David Mathews F. David Mathews Alabama August 8, 1975 January 20, 1977
12 JAC AR 2007 Joseph A. Califano Jr. District of Columbia January 25, 1977 August 3, 1979 Jimmy Carter
13 Patricia R. Harris Patricia Roberts Harris District of Columbia August 3, 1979 May 4, 1980[13]

Secretaries of Health and Human Services

No. Portrait Name State of Residence Took office Left office President(s)
13 Patricia R. Harris Patricia Roberts Harris District of Columbia May 4, 1980[13] January 20, 1981 Jimmy Carter
14 Secretary Richard Schweiker Richard S. Schweiker Pennsylvania January 22, 1981 February 3, 1983 Ronald Reagan
15 Mmheckler Margaret M. Heckler Massachusetts March 9, 1983 December 13, 1985
16 Otis R. Bowen Otis R. Bowen Indiana December 13, 1985 January 20, 1989
17 SullivanLouis Louis Wade Sullivan Georgia March 1, 1989 January 20, 1993 George H. W. Bush
18 Shalala portrait Donna Shalala Wisconsin January 22, 1993 January 20, 2001 Bill Clinton
19 Tommy Thompson 1 Tommy G. Thompson Wisconsin February 2, 2001 January 26, 2005 George W. Bush
20 Mike Leavitt Michael O. Leavitt Utah January 26, 2005 January 20, 2009
JohnsonCharlesE Charles E. Johnson Utah January 20, 2009 April 28, 2009 Barack Obama
21 Kathleen Sebelius official portrait (cropped) Kathleen Sebelius Kansas April 28, 2009 June 9, 2014
22 Sylvia Mathews Burwell official portrait (cropped) Sylvia Mathews Burwell District of Columbia June 9, 2014 January 20, 2017
Norris Cochran (cropped) Norris Cochran January 20, 2017 February 10, 2017 Donald Trump
23 Tom Price official photo (cropped) Tom Price Georgia February 10, 2017 September 29, 2017
Don J. Wright official portrait (cropped) Don J. Wright Virginia September 29, 2017 October 10, 2017
Eric D. Hargan official photo (cropped) Eric Hargan Illinois October 10, 2017 January 29, 2018
24 Alex Azar official portrait (cropped) Alex Azar Indiana January 29, 2018 Incumbent

Line of succession

The line of succession for the Secretary of Health and Human Services is as follows:[14]

  1. Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services.
  2. General Counsel of the Department of Health and Human Services
  3. Assistant Secretary for Administration
  4. Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation
  5. Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
  6. Commissioner of Food and Drugs
  7. Director of the National Institutes of Health
  8. Assistant Secretary for Children and Families
  9. Other Assistant Secretaries (following in the order they took the oath of office)
    1. Assistant Secretary for Health
    2. Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response
    3. Assistant Secretary for Legislation
    4. Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs
    5. Assistant Secretary for Financial Resources
    6. Assistant Secretary for Aging
  10. Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  11. Director, Region 4 (Atlanta, Georgia)

Living former secretaries

Department of Health, Education, and Welfare

As of January 2019, there are two living former Secretaries of Health, Education and Welfare, the older being Joseph A. Califano Jr. (served 1977–1979, born 1931). The most recent Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare to die was Caspar Weinberger (served 1973–1975, born 1917), on March 28, 2006. The most recently serving Secretary to die was Patricia Roberts Harris (served 1979–1980, born 1924) on March 23, 1985.

Name Term Date of birth (and age)
F. David Mathews 1975–1977 December 6, 1935 (age 83)
Joseph A. Califano Jr. 1977–1979 May 15, 1931 (age 87)

Department of Health and Human Services

Panel for United States Secretaries of Health and Human Services at Spotlight Health Aspen Ideas Festival 2015
A gathering of five secretaries in June 2015

As of January 2019, there are seven living former Secretaries of Health and Human Services, the oldest being Louis W. Sullivan (served 1989–1993, born 1933); The most recent Secretary of Health and Human Services to die was Margaret Heckler (served 1983–1985, born 1931), on August 6, 2018. The most recently serving Secretary to die was Otis R. Bowen (served 1985–1989, born 1918) on May 4, 2013.

Name Term Date of birth (and age)
Louis W. Sullivan 1989–1993 November 3, 1933 (age 85)
Donna Shalala 1993–2001 February 14, 1941 (age 77)
Tommy Thompson 2001–2005 November 19, 1941 (age 77)
Mike Leavitt 2005–2009 February 11, 1951 (age 67)
Kathleen Sebelius 2009–2014 May 15, 1948 (age 70)
Sylvia Mathews Burwell 2014–2017 June 23, 1965 (age 53)
Tom Price 2017 October 8, 1954 (age 64)

References

  1. ^ "3 U.S. Code § 19 - Vacancy in offices of both President and Vice President; officers eligible to act". LII / Legal Information Institute. Retrieved November 10, 2017.
  2. ^ Holbrook, M. Cay (February 6, 2017). Foundations of Education: History and theory of teaching children and youths with visual impairments. American Foundation for the Blind. ISBN 9780891283409.
  3. ^ "Patricia R. Harris (1977–1979)—Miller Center". millercenter.org. Archived from the original on February 7, 2017. Retrieved February 6, 2017.
  4. ^ "Jurisdiction | The United States Senate Committee on Finance". www.finance.senate.gov. Retrieved February 6, 2017.
  5. ^ "Ropes & Gray LLP: Alerts". www.ropesgray.com. Retrieved November 10, 2017.
  6. ^ Leavitt, Michael O. (February 18, 2011). "Health reform's central flaw: Too much power in one office". The Washington Post.
  7. ^ Baker, Peter; Thrush, Glenn; Haberman, Maggie (September 29, 2017). "Health Secretary Tom Price Resigns After Drawing Ire for Chartered Flights". The New York Times. New York. Retrieved September 30, 2017.
  8. ^ Goldstein, Amy; Eilperin, Juliet (January 9, 2018). "Senate Finance Committee evaluates Alex Azar to be the next HHS secretary". The Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Retrieved January 28, 2018.
  9. ^ Pear, Robert (January 24, 2018). "Senate Confirms Trump Nominee Alex Azar as Health Secretary". The New York Times. New York. Retrieved January 28, 2018.
  10. ^ https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/alex-azar-sworn-in-as-secretary-of-health-and-human-services/2018/01/29/8257006e-0514-11e8-aa61-f3391373867e_story.html
  11. ^ "The President's Cabinet". Ben's Guide. February 1, 2007. Retrieved November 15, 2007.
  12. ^ "HHS Agencies & Offices | HHS.gov". Retrieved November 10, 2017.
  13. ^ a b Harris was Secretary on May 4, 1980, when the office changed names from Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare to Secretary of Health and Human Services. Because the department merely changed names, she did not need to be confirmed again, and her term continued uninterrupted.
  14. ^ "Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of Health and Human Services". Federal Register. February 20, 2008. Retrieved October 30, 2016.

External links

U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Alex Acosta
as Secretary of Labor
Order of Precedence of the United States
as Secretary of Health and Human Services
Succeeded by
Ben Carson
as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
U.S. presidential line of succession
Preceded by
Secretary of Labor
Alex Acosta
12th in line Succeeded by
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
Ben Carson
2010 Kansas gubernatorial election

The 2010 Kansas gubernatorial election was held on November 2, 2010. Incumbent Governor Mark Parkinson, who assumed office when previous Governor Kathleen Sebelius was sworn in as the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services on April 28, 2009, declined to seek election to a full term. United States Senator Sam Brownback, who unsuccessfully ran for president in 2008, emerged as the Republican nominee, facing off against Democratic State Senator Tom Holland, who was unopposed for his party's nomination. Owing to the large amount of popularity that he had accumulated during his tenure in the United States Senate, Brownback defeated Holland in a landslide to become the 46th Governor of Kansas.

Alex Azar

Alex Michael Azar II ( born June 17, 1967) is an American politician, lawyer, pharmaceutical lobbyist and former drug company executive who is the current United States Secretary of Health and Human Services. Azar was nominated by President Donald Trump on November 13, 2017 and confirmed by the United States Senate on January 24, 2018. He was formerly the United States Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services under George W. Bush from 2005 to 2007.From 2012 to 2017, Azar was President of the U.S. division of Eli Lilly and Company, a major pharmaceutical drug company, and was a member of the board of directors of the Biotechnology Innovation Organization, a pharmaceutical lobby.

Azar v. Garza

Garza v. Hargan (Azar v. Garza after Alex Azar's confirmation as United States Secretary of Health and Human Services) is a case before the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit regarding a juvenile undocumented immigrant in the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement who seeks to have an abortion.

Charles E. Johnson (government official)

Charles Edwin Johnson served as Acting United States Secretary of Health and Human Services from January to April 2009 during the Obama presidency. Johnson was appointed by then President George W. Bush in 2005 as Assistant Secretary for Budget, Technology, and Finance. He was a public accountant for 31 years prior to joining the department.

Don J. Wright

Don J. Wright is an American physician and government official.

Wright served as the acting United States Secretary of Health and Human Services for twelve days in 2017. He was designated by President Donald Trump after his predecessor, Tom Price, resigned on September 29, 2017, amid a charter-flight scandal. Wright was replaced as acting Secretary by newly-confirmed Deputy Secretary Eric Hargan on October 10, 2017.

Donna Shalala

Donna Edna Shalala ( shə-LAY-lə; born February 14, 1941) is an American politician who is currently the U.S. Representative for Florida's 27th congressional district. She previously served as the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 2001. She was the president of the University of Miami, a private university in Coral Gables, Florida, from 2001 through 2015. Previously she was the chancellor of the University of Wisconsin–Madison from 1988 to 1993. Shalala served as Trustee Professor of Political Science and Health Policy at the University of Miami, and was President of the Clinton Foundation from 2015 to March 2017. Shalala was elected to the House of Representatives in November 2018.

Eric Hargan

Eric David Hargan (born June 3, 1968) is an American lawyer and government official who served as the United States Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services from October 6, 2017 to January 29, 2018. A member of the Republican Party, Hargan previously acted in this role in 2007 under the George W. Bush administration.

On October 10, 2017, President Donald Trump appointed Hargan as acting United States Secretary of Health and Human Services, which he held until January 29, 2018, when Alex Azar assumed the office.

Health minister

A health minister is the member of a country's government typically responsible for protecting and promoting public health and providing welfare and other social security services.

Heckler v. Campbell

Heckler v. Campbell, 461 U.S. 458 (1983), is a United States Supreme Court case concerning whether the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services could rely on published medical-vocational guidelines to determine a claimant’s right to Social Security benefits.

John J. Gilligan

John Joyce Gilligan (March 22, 1921 – August 26, 2013) was an American Democratic politician from the state of Ohio who served as a U.S. Representative and as the 62nd Governor of Ohio from 1971 to 1975. He was the father of Kathleen Sebelius, who later served as Governor of Kansas and United States Secretary of Health and Human Services. Gilligan and Sebelius are the only father and daughter ever to have both been elected state governors.

John Rubin

John Rubin (born June 23, 1948) is a Republican member of the Kansas House of Representatives representing the 18th district (Shawnee in Johnson County).Rubin received his B.A. in political science magna cum laude from Boston College in 1970, and a J.D. degree from the Washington University School of Law in 1973. After graduation, Rubin served as a JAG Corps officer with the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War. He returned to Kansas City to work for the Kansas City District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as an attorney-advisor. Rubin soon was promoted to serve as the Assistant Regional Counsel at the Kansas City Regional Office of the Fereal Bureau of Prisons, then became a senior litigator for the Kansas City Region of the FDIC. In 1994, the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services, Donna Shalala, appointed him as a State Administrative Law Judge. He retired ten years later from the Federal bench, and has been an arbitrator for the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority since. In 2010, Rubin was elected to represent the 18th District seat in the Kansas House.

K. Gary Sebelius

Keith Gary Sebelius (born November 8, 1949), known professionally as K. Gary Sebelius or Gary Sebelius, is an American magistrate judge and a former federal judicial nominee to the United States District Court for the District of Kansas. He is the husband of former United States Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius and also served as the First Gentleman of Kansas from 2003 to 2009, while his wife was governor.

Kansas state budget (2008–09)

Kansas, like many other states, is facing a $186 million gap for fiscal year 2009 and according to early estimates approximately $1 billion deficit for fiscal year 2010. However, more recent estimates place FY 2010's shortfall at $654 million.Governor Kathleen Sebelius recommended $600 million in budget cuts for FY 2010 which includes eliminating programs, closing facilities, freezing new hires, and reducing spending. However, in light of the federal economic stimulus package Sebelius amended her recommended budget to "prevent harm" to the state. "Budget cuts deeper than what I have already recommended are not necessary, and would in fact do great harm to our state’s economy and employment levels," said Sebelius. However, state officials said their target for reductions in fiscal 2010 is greater than the Governor's recommendations - $625 million. According to the Governor's recommended budget, the proposed cuts could reduce the projected FY2010 shortfall $103 million, however that estimate depends on $57 million in revenue from state-owned casinos that haven’t yet been built.However, Sebelius' 2009 appointment by President Barack Obama as United States Secretary of Health and Human Services had some state legislators that the nomination is a "distraction" from the state's budget crisis. "The state budget remains substantially out of balance, and she will leave behind no consensus on how to balance it," said Senate majority leader Derek Schmidt. House minority leader Paul Davis said that he expected nothing but a smooth transition when Sebelius left office. Lieutenant Governor Former Republican Party leader turned Democrat Mark Parkinson assumed Sebelius' role as governor.

Kathleen Sebelius

Kathleen Sebelius (; née Gilligan; born May 15, 1948) is an American businesswoman and politician who served as the 21st United States Secretary of Health and Human Services from 2009 until 2014. Previously, she was the 44th Governor of Kansas from 2003 to 2009, the second woman to hold that office. She is a member of the Democratic Party. Sebelius was the Democratic respondent to the 2008 State of the Union address and is chair-emerita of the Democratic Governors Association (she was its first female chair). On April 10, 2014, Sebelius announced her resignation as Secretary of Health and Human Services. She is CEO of Sebelius Resources LLC.

Liquid Candy

Liquid Candy: How Soft Drinks are Harming Americans' Health is a report published by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) which examines the increasing levels of soft drink consumption in the United States, particularly by children and teenagers, and the health problems this poses. Originally published in 1998, a second edition containing updated data was released in 2005.As well as discussing a selection of the health disorders connected with soft drinks, such as tooth decay, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis and kidney stones, the report also looks at the reduced nutritional intake resulting from soft drinks displacing other more nutritious food and drink. While its main focus is on sweeteners such as sugar and high-fructose corn syrup, brief attention is given to other common soft drink additives such as caffeine, artificial colorings, and artificial sweeteners.

Liquid Candy also explores the marketing and labeling of soft drinks, and ends with a number of recommendations for action, including: calling for the declaration of soft drink caloric content on restaurant menus; aggressive placement of water fountains, especially in schools; stopping the sale and advertising of soft drinks in schools; requiring medical professionals to routinely ask their patients about their soft drink consumption level; and levying taxes on soft drink sales to pay for mass-media campaigns to improve diet and promote physical activity.In connection with the 2005 republication of the report, the CSPI filed a petition with the Food and Drug Administration, and also organized for a letter, signed by over 40 scientists, health professionals and organizations, to be sent to the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services.

Norris Cochran

Norris Woodhull Cochran IV is the current Deputy Assistant Secretary of Budget in the United States Department of Health and Human Services. He served as Acting Secretary of Health and Human Services from January to February 2017.

Cochran first worked for the federal government in 1996 when he joined the Centers for Disease Control. Between 2001 and 2006 he worked for the Health Division of the Office of Management and Budget. On February 5, 2006, he joined the Department of Health and Human Services. He has been Deputy Assistant Secretary of Budget, a Senior Executive Service position, since at least 2012.

Patricia Roberts Harris

Patricia Roberts Harris (May 31, 1924 – March 23, 1985) served in the American administration of President Jimmy Carter as United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, and United States Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare (which was renamed the Secretary of Health and Human Services during her tenure). She was the first African American woman to serve in the United States Cabinet, and the first to enter the line of succession to the Presidency. She previously served as United States Ambassador to Luxembourg under President Lyndon B. Johnson, and was the first African-American woman to represent the United States as an ambassador.

Sylvia Mathews Burwell

Sylvia Mary Mathews Burwell (born June 23, 1965) is an American government and non-profit executive, who is the 15th president of American University since June 1, 2017. She is the first woman to serve as the university's president. She earlier served as the 22nd United States Secretary of Health and Human Services. President Barack Obama nominated Burwell on April 11, 2014. Burwell's nomination was confirmed by the Senate on June 5, 2014, by a vote of 78–17. She served as Secretary until the end of the Obama administration. Previously, she had been the Director of the White House Office of Management and Budget from 2013 to 2014.

A West Virginia native, Burwell first worked for the United States government in Washington, D.C., during the presidency of Bill Clinton. She helped form the National Economic Council in 1993. She later served as Chief of Staff to Secretary of the Treasury Robert Rubin, Deputy White House Chief of Staff to Erskine Bowles, and finally Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget.

Between her times in government, Burwell served as president of Walmart's charitable foundation focused on ending hunger, beginning in January 2012. She was earlier the president of the Global Development Program of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, where her program focused on combating world poverty through agricultural development, financial services for the poor, and global libraries. She was Chief Operating Officer and Executive Director before its reorganization in 2006. She had joined the Gates Foundation in 2001, at the end of the Clinton Presidency.

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