United States Department of the Navy

The United States Department of the Navy (DoN) was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798 (initiated by the recommendation of James McHenry),[1] to provide a government organizational structure to the United States Navy, the United States Marine Corps (from 1834 onward) and, when directed by the President (or Congress during time of war), the United States Coast Guard, as a service within the Department of the Navy,[2] though each remain independent service branches. The Department of the Navy was an Executive Department and the Secretary of the Navy was a member of the President's cabinet until 1949, when amendments to the National Security Act of 1947 changed the name of the National Military Establishment to the Department of Defense and made it an Executive Department. The Department of the Navy then became, along with the Department of the Army and Department of the Air Force, a Military Department within the Department of Defense: subject to the authority, direction and control of the Secretary of Defense.

Department of the Navy
(DoN)
Seal of the United States Department of the Navy
Seal of the U.S. Department of the Navy
Agency overview
FormedApril 30, 1798
Jurisdiction United States Navy
 United States Marine Corps
 United States Coast Guard (in time of war)
HeadquartersThe Pentagon, Arlington County, Virginia, U.S.
Agency executives
Parent agencyU.S. Department of Defense
Websitehttp://www.secnav.navy.mil/

Leadership

Seal of the United States Department of the Navy (1879-1957)
Seal of the U.S. Department of the Navy from 1879 to 1957.
DON-org-sec
Navy Department, mainly the Office of the Secretary, organizational structure (2006.)

The Department of the Navy is headed by the Secretary of the Navy, also known as the SECNAV in naval jargon, who has the authority to conduct all of the affairs of the Department, subject to lawful authority, the Secretary of Defense, and the President. The Secretary of the Navy is appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate.[3] The Secretary is assisted by an Under Secretary of the Navy, four Assistant Secretaries of the Navy and a General Counsel of the Department of the Navy, who are also appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate.

The highest ranking military officers in the Department of the Navy are the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant of the Marine Corps, who are the principal military advisors to the Secretary of the Navy. They supervise their respective military services of the Department of the Navy, and in a separate capacity serve as members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. They are assisted by a Vice Chief of Naval Operations and an Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps.

Composition

Unlike its U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force counterparts, the Department of the Navy comprises two uniformed services: the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps (sometimes collectively called the "naval services" or "sea services").[4]

The Department of the Navy consists of all elements of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. According to Navy Regulations Section 0204-2, the term "Navy Department" refers only to the executive offices at the seat of government.

The Department of the Navy is composed of the following:[5]

Proposed redesignation

A provision in the initial House of Representatives bill (H.R. 1585) for the fiscal year 2008 national defense authorization would have renamed the Department of the Navy as the "Department of the Navy and Marine Corps". The bill passed in the House on 17 May 2007,[6] but encountered opposition among members of the DoD civilian leadership and among senior Navy admirals and Marine Corps generals.

In the Senate, the provision was replaced in S. Amdt. 2011, an amendment in the nature of a substitute proposed by Senator Carl Levin of Michigan on 9 July 2007 and agreed to by unanimous consent on 1 October 2007.[7] The amendment removed the renaming provision and also made other changes. The House version including the provision was withdrawn in conference committee and so was not included in the final National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008.

See also

References

  1. ^ Bernard C. Steiner and James McHenry, The life and correspondence of James McHenry (Cleveland: Burrows Brothers Co., 1907).
  2. ^ Chap. XXXV. 1 Stat. 553 from "A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: U. S. Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774 - 1875". Library of Congress, Law Library of Congress. Retrieved March 24, 2012.
  3. ^ 10 USC §5013 Archived 3 February 2011 at the Wayback Machine, Accessed on 2011-03-23.
  4. ^ See William A. Owens, High Seas: The Naval Passage to an Uncharted World (1995), Naval Institute Press, p. 100; Brent G. Filbert and Alan G. Kaufman, Naval Law: Justice and Procedure in the Sea Services (1998), Naval Institute Press; Brian R. Wolff and John Alexander, The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Into the 21st Century (1997), Osprey, p. 7; Joseph H. Alexander and Merrill L. Bartlett, Sea Soldiers in the Cold War: Amphibious Warfare, 1945-1991 (1995), Naval Institute Press; p. 71, p. 175.
  5. ^ 10 USC §5061, Accessed on 2011-03-23
  6. ^ "H.R. 1585: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008". Legislation: 2007-2008 (110th Congress). GovTrack.us. 17 May 2007. Retrieved 6 December 2016.
  7. ^ "S.Amdt. 2011: In the nature of a substitute". Legislation: 2007-2008 (110th Congress). GovTrack.us. Archived from the original on 15 September 2008. Retrieved 24 December 2007.

Further reading

External links

Assistant Secretary of the Navy

Assistant Secretary of the Navy (ASN) is the title given to certain civilian senior officials in the United States Department of the Navy.

From 1861 to 1954, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy was the second highest civilian office in the Department of the Navy (reporting to the United States Secretary of the Navy). That role has since been supplanted by the office of Under Secretary of the Navy and the office of Assistant Secretary of the Navy has been abolished. There have, however, been a number of offices bearing the phrase "Assistant Secretary of the Navy" in their title (see below for details).

At present, there are four Assistant Secretaries of the Navy, each of whom reports to and assists the Secretary of the Navy and the Under Secretary of the Navy:

Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition)

Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs)

Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Financial Management and Comptroller)

Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Installations and Environment)

The General Counsel of the Navy is equivalent in rank to the four Assistant Secretaries.

Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Installations and Logistics)

The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Installations and Logistics) (abbreviated ASN (I&L)) was a civilian office in the United States Department of the Navy, c. 1960s-1970s. The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Installations and Logistics) was responsible for all U.S. naval installations and for managing the logistics of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps.

Kenneth E. BeLieu held this position from 1961 to 1965.

Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs)

The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) (abbreviated as ASN M&RA) is a civilian office in the United States Department of the Navy. The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) reports to the Under Secretary of the Navy who in turn reports to the United States Secretary of the Navy.

The office of Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) was created in 1968. The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) is responsible for recruiting all of the personnel of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps, including military personnel (both active and reserve), government civilians, contractors, and volunteers. Since 1993, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) has been assisted by the Department of the Navy Force Management Oversight Council, an advisory council of senior military and civilian personnel in the Department of the Navy.

Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Material)

The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Material) was a civilian office in the United States Department of the Navy, c. 1950s. The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Material) was responsible for procurement of materials for the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps.

The office was held by Fred A. Bantz from 1957 to 1959.

Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition)

The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) (abbreviated ASN RDA) is a civilian office of the United States Department of the Navy. The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) requires Senate confirmation, and engages in duties as directed by the United States Secretary of the Navy.The office was created in 1990 by merging the duties of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Shipbuilding and Logistics) and the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Engineering and Systems). The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) is responsible for all of the acquisition functions and programs for the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps, subject to the guidelines propounded by the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics. The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) is also in charge of the Office of Naval Research.

President Donald Trump has nominated James Geurts, a former Air Force officer and career civil servant, to be the ASN RDA.

Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Shipbuilding and Logistics)

The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Shipbuilding and Logistics) was a civilian office in the United States Department of the Navy. The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Shipbuilding and Logistics) oversaw the building of ships for the United States Navy and other logistical matters.

The office of Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Shipbuilding and Logistics) was abolished in 1990, when it was merged with the office of Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Engineering and Systems) to form the new office of Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisitions).

Awards and decorations of the United States Department of the Navy

The Awards and decorations of the United States Department of the Navy are the military awards and decorations which are presented to members of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps under the authority of the Secretary of the Navy.

Other military service members may also receive specific Navy Department military awards, provided such service members are performing duty under a Navy or Marine Corps command. Likewise, a Navy or Marine Corps service member may receive medals and decorations of another military branch, if cross assigned to a command of the respective service. All Navy and Marine Corps members are eligible to receive inter-service awards and decorations as well as approved foreign awards and International awards.

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery

The Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) is an agency of the United States Department of the Navy that manages health care activities for the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps. BUMED operates hospitals and other health care facilities as well as laboratories for biomedical research, and trains and manages the Navy's many staff corps related to medicine. Its headquarters is located at the Defense Health Headquarters in Falls Church, Virginia. BUMED has 63,000 medical personnel and more than a million eligible beneficiaries.

Bureau of Naval Personnel

The Bureau of Naval Personnel (BUPERS) in the United States Department of the Navy is similar to the human resources department of a corporation. The bureau provides administrative leadership and policy planning for the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) and the U.S. Navy at large. BUPERS is led by the Chief of Naval Personnel.

As of 2009, the office of the Bureau of Naval Personnel serves as a parent command to the Navy Personnel Command (NPC). The duties of NPC are nearly identical to the former office of BUPERS and the command's logo even incorporates the name of the latter's office. BUPERS is also the overseeing authority for Navy Recruiting Command. Most of the BUPERS offices are located in the cities Millington, Tennessee and Arlington, Virginia.

Fleet Marine Force

The United States Fleet Marine Forces (FMF) are combined general and special purpose forces within the United States Department of the Navy that perform offensive amphibious or expeditionary warfare and defensive maritime employment. The Fleet Marine Forces provide the National Command Authority (NCA) with a responsive force that can conduct operations in any spectrum of conflict around the globe.

Fred A. Bantz

Fred A. Bantz (June 25, 1895 – September 22, 1982) was an official in the United States Department of the Navy during the administration of President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Judge Advocate General's Corps, U.S. Navy

The Judge Advocate General's Corps also known as the "JAG Corps" or "JAG" is the legal arm of the United States Navy. Today, the corps consists of a worldwide organization of more than 730 commissioned officers serving as judge advocates, 30 limited duty officers (law), 500 enlisted members (primarily in the Legalman rating) and nearly 275 civilian personnel, all serving under the direction of the Judge Advocate General of the Navy.

The headquarters of the Judge Advocate General's Corps of the United States Department of the Navy is located at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C.

Judge Advocate General of the Navy

The Judge Advocate General of the Navy (JAG) is the highest-ranking uniformed lawyer in the United States Department of the Navy. The Judge Advocate General is the principal advisor to the Secretary of the Navy and the Chief of Naval Operations on legal matters pertaining to the Navy. The Judge Advocate General also performs other duties prescribed to them under 10 U.S.C. § 5148 and those prescribed under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

Mark E. Andrews

Mark Edwin Andrews (October 17, 1903 – August 22, 1992) was an oil executive who also served as an official in the United States Department of the Navy.

Naval Inspector General

The Office of Naval Inspector General for the United States Department of the Navy was established during World War II to make investigations as directed by the Secretary of the Navy and the Chief of Naval Operations. The current mission of the Naval Inspector General is "to inspect, investigate, or inquire into matters of importance to the Department of the Navy and maintain the highest level of public confidence".

Naval Reactors

Naval Reactors (NR) is an umbrella term for the U.S. government office that has comprehensive responsibility for safe and reliable operation of the United States Navy's nuclear propulsion program. A single entity, it has authority and reporting responsibilities within both the United States Department of the Navy (Chief of Naval Operations and the Naval Sea Systems Command, NAVSEA), and the United States Department of Energy (National Nuclear Security Administration).Program responsibilities are delineated in Presidential Executive Order 12344 of February 1, 1982, and prescribed by Public Laws 98-525 of October 19, 1984 (42 USC 7158), and 106-65 of October 5, 1999 (50 USC 2406).

Navy and Marine Corps Medal

The Navy and Marine Corps Medal is the highest non-combat decoration awarded for heroism by the United States Department of the Navy to the members of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps. The medal was established by an act of Congress on 7 August 1942, and is authorized under 10 U.S.C. § 6246.

The Navy and Marine Corps Medal is the equivalent of the Army's Soldier's Medal, Air Force's Airman's Medal, and Coast Guard's Coast Guard Medal.

United States Under Secretary of the Navy

The Under Secretary of the Navy is the second-highest ranking civilian official in the United States Department of the Navy. The Under Secretary, called the "Under" in Pentagon slang, reports to the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV).

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