United States Attorney for the District of Columbia

The United States Attorney for the District of Columbia is the United States Attorney responsible for representing the federal government in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.

Unlike the states, District of Columbia is under the exclusive jurisdiction of the U.S. Congress. By statute, the U.S. Attorney is responsible for prosecuting both federal crimes and all serious crimes committed by adults in the District of Columbia. Therefore, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia serves as both the federal prosecutor (as in the other 92 U.S. Attorneys' offices) and as the local district attorney. The Attorney General of the District of Columbia, who is elected by the people of the District, handles local civil litigation and minor infractions, comparable with a City Attorney.

The current U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia is Jessie K. Liu, who was nominated by President Trump and confirmed by the Senate in September 2017.[1] Liu replaced Acting U.S. Attorney Channing D. Phillips.[2]

List of U.S. Attorneys for the District of Columbia

References

  1. ^ "PN613 — Jessie K. Liu — Department of Justice". congress.gov. United States Congress. September 14, 2017. Retrieved September 15, 2017.
  2. ^ U.S. Attorneys: District of Columbia on DOJ's U.S. Attorney's Office – District of Columbia website.
  3. ^ District of Columbia Superior Court bio of Ramsey Johnson
  4. ^ Female Assistant Is Named Interim Prosecutor for D.C., Washington Post, July 19, 1997
  5. ^ Wilma A. Lewis ’81 nominated to be assistant secretary for Land and Mineral Management, Harvard Law Today, May 12, 2009
  6. ^ United States Attorney Taylor announces resignation
  7. ^ Taylor Withdraws US Attorney Confirmation Bid after Losing Norton Support
  8. ^ Acting United States Attorney Vincent H. Cohen, Jr. to Step Down

Sources

Ashley Mulgrave Gould

Ashley Mulgrave Gould (October 8, 1859 – May 20, 1921) was a United States federal judge.

Born in Lower Horton, Nova Scotia, Canada, Gould received an A.B. from Amherst College in 1881 and an LL.B. from Georgetown University Law School in 1884. He was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates in 1898, and was the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia from 1901 to 1902. He began teaching as a professor of law at Georgetown University in 1901.

On December 2, 1902, Gould was nominated by President Theodore Roosevelt to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia vacated by Andrew C. Bradley. Gould was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 8, 1902, and received his commission the same day. He served until his death.

Catherine B. Kelly

Catherine B. Kelly was an Associate Judge of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, the highest court for the District of Columbia.Kelly was raised in D.C. and graduated from Western High School in 1934 and Smith College in 1939. She served in the Women's Army Corps during World War II and then graduated from George Washington University Law School in 1951. From 1953 to 1957, she worked in the civil division of the office of the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia. She became a judge on the D.C. Municipal Court (predecessor to the Superior Court of the District of Columbia) in 1957 and was elevated to the appeals court in 1967. On the appeals court, she gained a reputation as a liberal ally of Chief Judge Theodore R. Newman Jr.. Her law clerks included future judges Diane Gilbert Sypolt and Colleen Kollar-Kotelly. In 1983, she retired from the court and returned to private practice, becoming a partner at a firm her father and uncle founded in the 1920s. She served as D.C. ethics ombudsman under Mayors Marion Barry and Sharon Pratt Kelly.

Channing D. Phillips

Channing D. Phillips was the acting United States Attorney for the District of Columbia, serving from October 2015 to September 2017. Phillips is the son of Channing E. Phillips, a minister and civil rights activist who became the first African-American to have his name placed in nomination for President of the United States by a major political party in 1968.

Charles Henry Turner (U.S. Representative)

Charles Henry Turner (May 26, 1861 – August 31, 1913) was a U.S. Representative from New York.

Born in Wentworth, New Hampshire, Turner attended the common schools before moving to New York City in November 1879. He attended Columbia College there from 1886 to 1888, the year in which he unsuccessfully ran for State senator.

Turner was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-first Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Frank T. Fitzgerald and served from December 9, 1889, to March 3, 1891. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1890.

Turner then served as Doorkeeper of the United States House of Representatives from 1891-1893.

Having studied Law, Turner was admitted to the bar in 1897 and commenced practice in Washington, D.C..

He was appointed assistant district attorney for the District of Columbia on July 16, 1903, and served until his resignation on September 1, 1911. Soon after, on November 27, 1911 he was appointed as special assistant to the United States attorney for the District of Columbia, a position which he held until his death on August 31, 1913 in Wentworth, New Hampshire. He was interred in Wentworth Cemetery.

David G. Bress

David G. Bress (1908-1976) was an American lawyer who served as United States Attorney for the District of Columbia from 1965 to 1969. He was nominated by President Johnson for a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, but the Senate never voted on his nomination.

Bress later served as a defense lawyer for alleged Watergate conspirator Robert Mardian. Shortly after Mardian's trial began, Bress became so ill from cancer that he was unable to continue working, and he was replaced by his assistant Tom Green.

Earl J. Silbert

Earl J. Silbert (born March 8, 1936) is a prominent American lawyer who served as United States Attorney for the District of Columbia from 1974 to 1979, and served, along with two other U.S. Attorneys, as the first prosecutor in the infamous Watergate scandal. His daughter is novelist Leslie Silbert.

George B. Corkhill

George Baker Corkhill (1838–1886) was an American lawyer who served as United States Attorney for the District of Columbia and prosecuted Charles J. Guiteau for the assassination of James A. Garfield.

Corkhill was born in Harrison County, Ohio, and moved to Iowa with his family at age nine. In 1859, he graduated from Iowa Wesleyan University in Mount Pleasant, Iowa. He studied law at Harvard Law School but left to join the Union Army when the Civil War broke out. He served throughout the war, attaining the rank of lieutenant colonel. After the war he worked for Senator and Secretary of the Interior James Harlan in Washington, D.C., and practiced law in Iowa. In 1872, he returned to Washington and became the editor and part-owner of a newspaper, the Washington Daily Chronicle, until it went out of business. In January 1880, he became United States Attorney for the District of Columbia and served on the prosecution team during the Guiteau trial, which began in November 1881 and ended with Guiteau's conviction in January 1882. He also prosecuted postal officials involved in the Star Route scandal.Corkhill's first marriage was to Olive B. Miller, the eldest daughter of Supreme Court Justice Samuel Freeman Miller. His second marriage was to a daughter of Hiram Walbridge, a U.S. Representative from New York. During his time in Washington he lived at Ingleside. He died in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, on July 6, 1886, from a disability contracted during the war. The New York Times, in his obituary, described him as "one of the best known and most popular men in the District [of Columbia]."

Hoban

Hoban may refer to:

Barry Hoban (born 1940), British cyclist

Edward Francis Hoban (1878–1966), Catholic bishop of Rockford and Cleveland

James Hoban (1758–1831), Irish-born American architect who designed the White House in Washington, D.C.

James Hoban, Jr. (1808–46), United States Attorney for the District of Columbia and son of the above

Jeanne Hoban (1924–1997), British political activist

Lillian Hoban (1925–1998), American writer and artist

Mark Hoban (born 1964), British politician

Patricia Hoban (born 1932), Australian basketball player

Russell Hoban (1925–2011), American writer

Hoban Washburne, fictional character in the television series Firefly

Archbishop Hoban High School, Catholic school in Akron, Ohio

James Hoban Jr.

James Hoban Jr. (1808–1846) was an American lawyer who served as United States Attorney for the District of Columbia in the 1840s. He was said to be the spitting image of his father, James Hoban, an Irish-American architect who designed the White House.

Jeffrey A. Taylor

Jeffrey A. Taylor is the former interim United States Attorney for the District of Columbia. He is a graduate of Stanford University and Harvard Law School.

Jessie K. Liu

Jessie Kong Liu (born January 2, 1973) is an American attorney who is the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia. She previously worked as deputy general counsel at the U.S. Treasury and served at the Justice Department. On March 5, 2019, media outlets reported that the Trump Administration would nominate her for the position of Associate Attorney General of the United States.

Joseph diGenova

Joseph DiGenova (born February 22, 1945) is an American attorney who served as the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia from 1983 to 1988. He is known for promoting conspiracy theories about the Department of Justice and the FBI.

Lawrence Barcella

E. Lawrence Barcella, Jr., often known as Larry Barcella (23 May 1945 – 4 November 2010) was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Columbia (1971–1986) and a criminal defense lawyer in private practice (1986–2010), specializing in white-collar crime.

Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995

The Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. § 1601) was legislation in the United States aimed at bringing increased accountability to federal lobbying practices in the United States. The law was amended substantially by the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007. Under provisions which took effect on January 1, 1996, federal lobbyists are required to register with the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and the Secretary of the United States Senate. Anyone failing to do so is punishable by a civil fine of up to $50,000. The clerk and secretary must refer any acts of non-compliance to the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia.

A consequence of the act is that the act "removed from Foreign Agents Registration Act a class of agents who are engaged in lobbying activities and who register under the LDA. This Act is administered by Congress."

Robert Spagnoletti

Robert Spagnoletti is the former Attorney General of the District of Columbia, United States, appointed 2004. He previously served as District of Columbia Corporation Counsel, and as an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Columbia. He announced in late 2006 that he was leaving that office in 2006 to work at a private D.C. law firm, Schertler & Onorato LLP. He served a one-year term as President of the District of Columbia Bar beginning in June 2008 and became chief executive officer in May 2017.

Ronald Machen

Ronald C. Machen Jr. is the former United States Attorney for the District of Columbia. In April 2015, he left the position and returned to the law firm WilmerHale after the longest tenure as US Attorney for the District of Columbia in more than 35 years.

Thomas H. Anderson (judge)

Thomas H. Anderson (June 6, 1848 – October 1, 1916) was a United States federal judge.

Anderson was born in Belmont County, Ohio, and attended Mount Union College. He was a high school principal in Cambridge, Ohio in 1871. He was in private practice of law in Cambridge, Ohio from 1871 to 1889 and in Washington, D.C., from 1893 to 1899, interrupted by a stint as the U.S. Minister to Bolivia from 1889 to 1893. He served as the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia from 1899 to 1901.

Anderson received a recess appointment from William McKinley on April 23, 1901, to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia vacated by Charles C. Cole. He was nominated for the seat on December 5, 1901, confirmed by the United States Senate on February 4, 1902, and received his commission on February 6, 1902. Anderson's service was terminated on October 1, 1916, due to his death.

Thomas Swann (disambiguation)

Thomas Swann is the name of:

Thomas Swann (attorney), a prominent lawyer who served as United States Attorney for the District of Columbia from 1821 to 1833

Thomas Swann (1809–1883), son of the above, 33rd Governor of Maryland, U.S.A.

Thomas Burnett Swann (1928–1976), American poet, critic and fantasy author

Thomas Swann (rower) (born 1987), Australian rower

Wilma A. Lewis

Wilma A. Lewis (born June 23, 1956) is the current chief judge of the District Court of the Virgin Islands. She previously served as the first female United States Attorney for the District of Columbia.

Lewis was born in Santurce, Puerto Rico and raised in Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. Her parents, Walter and Juta Lewis, were both federal civil servants, working for the United States Postal Service and the United States Customs Service, respectively. Lewis graduated as the valedictorian of her class at All Saints Cathedral School in 1974 and earned degrees from Swarthmore College in 1978 and Harvard Law School in 1981. She worked in the litigation department at Steptoe & Johnson until 1986, when she joined the U.S. Attorney's Office in Washington, D.C. She rose through the civil division to become deputy chief of the division in 1993. That year, she departed for the United States Department of the Interior, where she served as Associate Solicitor for the Division of General Law. In 1995, she was nominated by President Clinton and confirmed by the Senate as Inspector General of the Department of the Interior.

In 1998, Lewis was nominated and confirmed as United States Attorney for the District of Columbia, the first woman to serve in that position. She served from January 1998 to April 2001, when she became a partner in the litigation group at Crowell & Moring. From October 2007 to December 2008, she served as managing associate general counsel at Freddie Mac. In 2009, Barack Obama nominated Lewis to be Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management. She served in that position until 2011, when she was appointed to the District Court of the Virgin Islands. In August 2013, she was named to a seven-year term as Chief Judge of the court.

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