United States Assistant Secretary of War

The United States Assistant Secretary of War was the second-ranking official within the American Department of War from 1861 to 1867, from 1882 to 1883, and from 1890 to 1940. According to the Military Laws of the United States, "The act of August 5, 1882 authorizing the appointment of an Assistant Secretary of War was repealed by the act of July 7, 1884 (23 Stat L., 331) the power conferred by the act of August 5, 1882 never having been exercised," indicating that the post was not filled between 1882 and 1883 (p. 45, footnote 2).

In 1940, the new position of United States Under Secretary of War replaced this position as the number-two office in the department. Assistant Secretary Robert P. Patterson became the first Under Secretary.[1]

The office continued to exercise administrative duties until the department's end in 1947, when the United States Department of Defense was established.

Flag of the United States Assistant Secretary of War
Flag of the United States Assistant Secretary of War. It is now the flag of the U.S. Under Secretary of the Army.

List of Assistant Secretaries of War

This list only includes those persons who served as the Assistant Secretary, or First Assistant Secretary. At various times, there were also "second" or "third" assistant secretaries, ranking below the Assistant Secretary.

Assistant Secretary of War for Air

The Air Corps Act of 1926 (44 Stat. 780), passed on July 2 of that year,[20] created a Second Assistant Secretary position in the War Department variously called "Assistant Secretary of War for Aviation," "Assistant Secretary of War for Air," or "Assistant Secretary of War for Aeronautics." Those holding the office, with an eight-year vacancy between 1933 and 1941, were F. Trubee Davison (1926-1933),[21] Robert A. Lovett (1941-1945),[22] and Stuart Symington (1946-1947).[23]

See also

References

  1. ^ Arlington National Cemetery: Robert Porter Patterson
  2. ^ a b c d e f Perley Poore, Benjamin (1878). The political register and congressional directory: a statistical record of the Federal Officials...1776-1878. Boston: Houghton, Osgood and Company. p. 232.
  3. ^ Secretaries of War and Interim And Acting Secretaries Of The Army
  4. ^ General Doe, soldier and lawyer, was pioneer in baseball
  5. ^ New York Times: G. D. Meiklejohn In Nebraska. Assistant Secretary of War Speaks at Grand Island on the History of Imperialism
  6. ^ New York Times
  7. ^ Sanger Mansion
  8. ^ Pennsylvania at Antietam: Report of the Antietam Battlefield Memorial commission (mentions Oliver as Assistant Secretary, and Acting Secretary, of War, as of 1904)
  9. ^ Gallery of History (says that Oliver served as Assistant Secretary longer than any other individual)
  10. ^ "W. M. Ingraham, 80, Wilson Aide In 1917. Assistant Secretary of War for a Year Dies. Former Mayor of Portland, Me". New York Times. October 13, 1951. Retrieved 2015-04-17. William Moulton Ingraham, Assistant Secretary of War under President Wilson and a former Mayor of this city, died today at his home after a brief illness. He was 80 years old. ...
  11. ^ Time: "Crowell's Conspiracy," Oct. 15, 1923
  12. ^ Time magazine
  13. ^ "W. R. Williams Dies. Cabinet Aide In 1920. Assistant Secretary of War in the Wilson Administration. Was 65 Years Old". New York Times. Associated Press. Retrieved 2015-04-20. William Reid Williams, Assistant Secretary of War under President Woodrow Wilson and prominently identified with the business and social life of Richmond, died tonight. He was 65 years old
  14. ^ Arlington National Cemetery: Dwight Filley Davis
  15. ^ Time: "Change," October 26, 1925
  16. ^ Time: "The Hoover Week"
  17. ^ Time: "Second to Hurley," 1930
  18. ^ "Frederick Payne, Former U.S. Aide. Assistant Secretary of War for Hoover Dies. Served Springfield Ordnance Unit". New York Times. Associated Press. March 25, 1960. Retrieved 2015-04-19. Frederick Huff Payne, Assistant Secretary of War under former President Herbert Hoover, died today at the home of his son, Groverman. He was 83 years old.
  19. ^ Guide to the Harry Hines Woodring Collection
  20. ^ Time: "Job No. 2"
  21. ^ Time: "New Amphibian"
  22. ^ Time: "Methodists & Businessmen "
  23. ^ Time: "Line-Up"
Benedict Crowell

Benedict Crowell (October 12, 1869 – September 8, 1952) was a United States military officer and politician particularly influential in military organization during and following World War I. He was United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1917 to 1920.

Camp Thomas A. Scott

Camp Thomas A. Scott, located in Fort Wayne, Indiana, was a Railway Operating Battalion training center for the Pennsylvania Railroad from 1942 to 1944 and a prisoner of war camp during World War II. It was named for Thomas A. Scott, who served as the fourth president of the Pennsylvania Railroad from 1874-1880. As the United States Assistant Secretary of War in 1861, Scott was instrumental in using railroads for military purposes during the American Civil War.

Christopher Wolcott

Christopher Parsons Wolcott was a Republican politician from the state of Ohio. He was Ohio Attorney General 1856–1860 and United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1862 to 1863.

Fred Payne

Fred Payne may refer to:

Fred Payne (baseball) (1880–1954), Major League Baseball player for the Detroit Tigers and Chicago White Sox

Frederick Payne of the Payne Brothers pantomime act

Frederick G. Payne (1904–1978), U.S. politician

Frederick Huff Payne (1876–1960), United States Assistant Secretary of War

Fred Payne (footballer) (born 1927), Australian rules footballer

Fred Payne (actor), British actor in Nuts and Wine

Frederick Payne (umpire) (1908–1992), South African cricket umpire

Frederick R. Payne Jr. (1911–2015), American Marine Corps general

Frederick Huff Payne

Frederick Huff Payne (November 10, 1876 – March 24, 1960) was the United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1930 to 1933, under President Herbert Hoover.

George de Rue Meiklejohn

George de Rue Meiklejohn (; August 26, 1857 – April 19, 1929) was a Nebraska Republican politician who served as the fifth Lieutenant Governor of Nebraska under Governor John Milton Thayer and a member of the United States House of Representatives for Nebraska. He was the United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1897 to 1901.

Hanford MacNider

Hanford MacNider (October 2, 1889 – February 18, 1968) was a senior officer of the United States Army who fought in both world wars. MacNider served as a diplomat, the United States Assistant Secretary of War, from 1925 to 1928, and the National Commander of The American Legion from 1921 to 1922.

Harry Hines Woodring

Harry Hines Woodring (May 31, 1887 – September 9, 1967) was an American politician. A Democrat, he was the 25th Governor of Kansas and was Secretary of War in President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's administration from 1936 to 1940. He was also the United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1933 to 1936.

Henry Skillman Breckinridge

Henry Skillman Breckinridge (May 25, 1886 – May 2, 1960) was an American lawyer and politician, best known as Charles Lindbergh's attorney during the Lindbergh kidnapping trial and the only serious opponent of President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1936 Democratic primaries. He was the United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1913 to 1916.

Howard C. Petersen

Howard Charles Petersen (1910–1995) was an American government official and banker. He was the United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1945 to 1947.

J. Mayhew Wainwright

Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright (December 10, 1864 – June 3, 1945) was an American lawyer and politician from New York. He was the United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1921 to 1923.

Jonathan Wainwright

Jonathan Wainwright may refer to several members of the Wainwright family of the United States:

Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright I (1792–1854), Episcopal bishop of New York. Son of Peter Wainwright and Elizabeth Mayhew.Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright II (1821–1863), United States Navy officer killed in the American Civil War, son of the bishopJonathan Mayhew Wainwright III (1849-1870)Jonathan Mayhew "Skinny" Wainwright IV (1883–1953), United States Army general during World War II. Son of Robert Powell Page Wainwright (younger brother of Jonathan Mayhew III).Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright (1864–1945), United States Congressman, Army officer in the Spanish–American War and World War I, and United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1921 to 1923. Son of John Howard Wainwright (younger brother of the civil war officer) and Margaret Livingston Stuyvesant.

Lewis A. Grant

Lewis Addison Grant (January 17, 1828 – March 20, 1918) was a teacher, lawyer, soldier in the Union Army during the American Civil War, and later United States Assistant Secretary of War. He was among the leading officers from the state of Vermont, and received the Medal of Honor for "personal gallantry and intrepidity."

Robert Oliver

Robert Oliver may refer to:

Robert Oliver (cyclist) (born 1950), former road and track cyclist from New Zealand

Robert B. Oliver (1895–1964), mayor of Norwalk, Connecticut, 1943–1945

Robert Don Oliver (1895–1980), British Royal Navy officer

Robert Dudley Oliver (1766–1850), British Royal Navy officer

Robert Shaw Oliver (1847–1935), United States Assistant Secretary of War

Robert T. Oliver (1909–2000), American author, lecturer, and authority on public speaking

Robert W. Oliver (1815–1899), first Chancellor of the University of Kansas

Robert Oliver (chef), New Zealand chef who was raised in Fiji and Samoa

Robert Oliver (priest) (1710–1784), Archdeacon of the East Riding

Robert Oliver, founding director of Baltimore and Ohio Railroad

Thomas Eckert

Thomas Thompson Eckert (23 April 1825 – 20 October 1910) was an officer in the U.S. Army, Chief of the War Department Telegraph Staff from 1862–1866, United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1865–1867 and an executive at Western Union.

United States Under Secretary of War

The Under Secretary of War was a position created by an act of 16 December 1940 (54 Stat. 1224). At the same time, section 5a of the National Defense Act (1920) was amended to allow the United States Secretary of War to assign his responsibilities for procurement to any of his subordinates. The statute formerly assigned these responsibilities to the United States Assistant Secretary of War. The Assistant Secretary of War, Robert P. Patterson was nominated and confirmed in the post. The Secretary of War delegated his responsibilities for procurement to the Under Secretary on 28 April 1941. By November 1941 the Office of the Under Secretary of War (OUSW) employed 1,136 people, of whom 257 were military officers and the remainder civilians.

William Cary Sanger

William Cary Sanger, Sr. (May 21, 1853 – December 6, 1921) was the United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1901 to 1903.

William Moulton Ingraham

William Moulton Ingraham (1870 - October 13, 1951) was an American politician from Portland, Maine. A Democrat, Ingraham was elected Mayor of Portland in December 1915. He served one term in that position and was replaced the following year by Republican Wilford G. Chapman. He was then appointed United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1916 to 1917 in the Woodrow Wilson administration.

William Reid Williams

William Reid Williams (1866 - July 24, 1931) was the United States Assistant Secretary of War from 1920 to 1921.

Department
of War

(1789–1947)
Department
of the Army

(1947–present)

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