United States Ambassador to the United Nations

The United States Ambassador to the United Nations is the leader of the U.S. delegation, the U.S. Mission to the United Nations. The position is more formally known as the "Permanent Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations"; it is also known as the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations. There is also a Deputy Ambassador who assumes the duties of the ambassador in his or her absence. Like all United States ambassadors, the ambassador to the UN and the deputy ambassador are nominated by the U.S. President and confirmed by the Senate. The Ambassador serves at the pleasure of the President.

The U.S. Permanent Representative is charged with representing the United States on the U.N. Security Council and during almost all plenary meetings of the General Assembly, except in the rare situation in which a more senior officer of the United States (such as the U.S. Secretary of State or the President of the United States) is present.

Jonathan Cohen, the deputy permanent representative since June 8, 2018, a career diplomat, became the Acting U.S. Ambassador on January 1, 2019, after the resignation of Nikki Haley came into effect. On December 7, 2018, President Donald Trump named Heather Nauert to become the Permanent Ambassador, subject to Senate confirmation.[1][2] On February 16, 2019, after a lengthy period where Nauert had retreated from the public gaze, it was announced that she had withdrawn her name from consideration.[3][4] On February 22, 2019, President Trump nominated Kelly Knight Craft to become the Ambassador.[5]

United States Ambassador to the United Nations
U.S. Department of State official seal
Seal of the Department of State
Flag of a United States ambassador
Jonathan R. Cohen official photo
Incumbent
Jonathan Cohen
Acting

since January 1, 2019
United States Department of State
StyleMr. Ambassador
(informal)
His Excellency
(diplomatic)
Member ofNational Security Council
Reports toSecretary of State
SeatUnited Nations Headquarters
New York City, New York
AppointerThe President
with Senate advice and consent
Term lengthNo fixed term
FormationDecember 21, 1945
First holderEdward Stettinius Jr.
SalaryExecutive Schedule, level IV
Websiteusun.state.gov

Cabinet status

Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., a leading moderate Republican who lost his seat in the United States Senate to John F. Kennedy in the 1952 elections, was appointed ambassador to the United Nations in 1953 by Dwight D. Eisenhower in gratitude for the defeated senator's role in the new president's defeat of conservative leader Robert A. Taft for the 1952 Republican nomination and subsequent service as his campaign manager in the general election; Eisenhower raised the ambassadorship to cabinet rank in order to give Lodge direct access to him without having to go through the State Department.[6]

The Ambassadorship continued to hold this status through the Ford, Carter, and Reagan administrations but was removed from cabinet rank by George H. W. Bush, who had previously held the position himself. It was restored under the Clinton administration. It was not a cabinet-level position under the George W. Bush administration (from 2001 to 2009),[7][8] but was once again elevated under the Obama administration, and retained as such by the Trump administration.[9]

Former UN Ambassador (and current National Security Advisor) John R. Bolton has publicly opposed the granting of cabinet-level status to the office, stating "One, it overstates the role and importance the U.N. should have in U.S. foreign policy, second, you shouldn't have two secretaries in the same department".

In December 2018, it was reported by several news organizations that along with the nomination of Heather Nauert to replace Nikki Haley, the Trump administration would once again downgrade the position to non-Cabinet rank.[10]

List of Ambassadors

The following is a chronological list of those who have held the office:

# Ambassador Years served U.S. President
1 Edward Stettinius, as lend-lease administrator, September 2, 1941 Edward Stettinius Jr. January 17, 1946 – June 3, 1946 Harry Truman
No image Herschel Johnson June 3, 1946 – January 14, 1947
Acting
2 Austin Warren Robinson Warren Austin January 14, 1947 – January 22, 1953
Dwight D. Eisenhower
3 HenryCabotLodgeJr Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. January 26, 1953[11] – September 3, 1960
4 JamesJeremiahWadsworth James Jeremiah Wadsworth September 8, 1960 – January 21, 1961
John Kennedy
5 AdlaiEStevenson1900-1965 Adlai Stevenson January 23, 1961 – July 14, 1965
Lyndon B. Johnson
6 Arthur goldberg Arthur Goldberg July 28, 1965 – June 24, 1968
7 GeorgeWildmanBall George W. Ball June 26, 1968 – September 25, 1968
8 JamesWiggins James Russell Wiggins October 7, 1968 – January 20, 1969
9 AmbassadorCWYost Charles Yost January 23, 1969 – February 25, 1971 Richard Nixon
10 George H. W. Bush 91st Congress George H. W. Bush March 1, 1971 – January 18, 1973
11 John Scali John A. Scali February 20, 1973 – June 29, 1975
Gerald Ford
12 DanielPatrickMoynihan Daniel Patrick Moynihan June 30, 1975 – February 2, 1976
13 Wm Scranton Pennsylvania 87th Cong William Scranton March 15, 1976 – January 19, 1977
14 Andrew Young, bw head-and-shoulders photo, June 6, 1977 Andrew Young January 30, 1977 – September 23, 1979 Jimmy Carter
15 UnitedNationsAmbassadorMcHenry Donald McHenry September 23, 1979 – January 20, 1981
16 Od jeane-kirkpatrick-official-portrait 1-255x301 Jeane Kirkpatrick February 4, 1981 – April 1, 1985 Ronald Reagan
17 Ambassador Vernon A. Walters Vernon A. Walters May 22, 1985 – March 15, 1989
George H. W. Bush
18 ThomasRPickering Thomas R. Pickering March 20, 1989 – May 7, 1992
19 Ambassador Perkins Edward J. Perkins May 12, 1992 – January 27, 1993
Bill Clinton
20 Secretary of State Madeleine Albright Madeleine Albright January 27, 1993 – January 21, 1997
21 RichardsonAmb Bill Richardson February 18, 1997 – August 18, 1998
Peter Burleigh Peter Burleigh August 18, 1998 – September 7, 1999
Acting
22 Richard Holbrooke Richard Holbrooke September 7, 1999 – January 20, 2001
James B Cunningham James B. Cunningham January 20, 2001 – September 19, 2001
Acting
George W. Bush
23 John Negroponte official portrait State John Negroponte September 19, 2001 – June 23, 2004
24 John danforth John Danforth July 23, 2004 – January 20, 2005
Anne W Patterson ambassador 2011 Anne W. Patterson January 20, 2005 – August 2, 2005
Acting
25 John R. Bolton John R. Bolton August 2, 2005 – December 31, 2006
Recess appointment, not confirmed by the U.S. Senate
Alejandro D. Wolff US State Dept photo Alejandro Daniel Wolff December 31, 2006 – April 30, 2007
Acting
26 Zalmay Khalilzad in October 2011-cropped Zalmay Khalilzad April 30, 2007 – January 22, 2009
Barack Obama
27 Susan Rice, official State Dept photo portrait, 2009 Susan Rice January 26, 2009 – June 30, 2013
Rosemary DiCarlo official portrait Rosemary DiCarlo June 30, 2013 – August 5, 2013
Acting
28 Samantha Power Samantha Power August 5, 2013 – January 20, 2017
Michele J Sison Michele J. Sison January 20, 2017 – January 27, 2017
Acting
Donald Trump
29 Nikki Haley official photo (cropped) Nikki Haley January 27, 2017 – December 31, 2018
Jonathan R. Cohen official photo Jonathan Cohen January 1, 2019 – present
Acting

Living former U.S. Ambassadors to the United Nations

As of March 2019, there are twelve living former U.S. Ambassadors to the United Nation (with all Ambassadors that have served since 2001 still living), the oldest being Edward J. Perkins (served 1992–1993, born 1928). The most recent Ambassador to die was George H. W. Bush (served 1971–1973, born 1924), on November 30, 2018.

Andrew Jackson Young

Andrew Young
served 1977–1979, born March 13, 1932 (age 87)

UnitedNationsAmbassadorMcHenry

Donald McHenry
served 1979–1981, born October 13, 1936 (age 82)

ThomasRPickering

Thomas R. Pickering
served 1989–1992, born November 5, 1931 (age 87)

Ambassador Perkins

Edward J. Perkins
served 1992–1993, born June 8, 1928 (age 90)

Madeleine Albright (16373736069) (cropped)

Madeleine Albright
served 1993–1997, born May 15, 1937 (age 81)

Bill Richardson at the LBJ Library (3)

Bill Richardson
served 1997–1998, born November 15, 1947 (age 71)

John Negroponte official portrait

John Negroponte
served 2001–2004, born July 21, 1939 (age 79)

John danforth

John Danforth
served 2004–2005, born September 5, 1936 (age 82)

John R. Bolton official photo (cropped)

John R. Bolton
served 2005–2006, born November 20, 1948 (age 70)

Zalmay Khalilzad in October 2011-cropped

Zalmay Khalilzad
served 2007–2009, born March 22, 1951 (age 67)

Susan Rice official photo

Susan Rice
served 2009–2013, born November 17, 1964 (age 54)

Samantha Power official portrait

Samantha Power
served 2013–2017, born September 21, 1970 (age 48)

Nikki Haley official photo (cropped)

Nikki Haley
served 2017-2018, born January 20, 1972 (age 47)

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Trump picks Heather Nauert as new US envoy to UN". BBC News. December 7, 2018. Retrieved January 1, 2019.
  2. ^ Santucci, John (December 7, 2018). "Trump says he'll nominate Heather Nauert as UN ambassador". ABC News. Retrieved January 1, 2019.
  3. ^ After nearly 2 months, there's no sign of urgency to confirm Trump's UN pick
  4. ^ Jennifer Jacobs; Nick Wadhams; Margaret Talev (2019-02-16). "Nauert Says She'll Withdraw as Trump's Nominee for UN Ambassador". Bloomberg. Retrieved 2019-02-17.
  5. ^ Trump, Donald J. (2019-02-22). "I am pleased to announce that Kelly Knight Craft, our current Ambassador to Canada, is being nominated to be United States Ambassador to the United Nations..." @realdonaldtrump. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  6. ^ Hubbard, James P. (2011). The United States and the End of British Colonial Rule in Africa, 1941–1968. Jefferson City, NC: McFarland & Company. p. 172. ISBN 978-0-7864-5952-0.
  7. ^ Kelemen, Michele (December 1, 2008). "U.N. Envoy Nominee Rice Known As Smart, Tough". National Public Radio. Retrieved January 21, 2009. The head of the United Nations Foundation, a Washington-based advocacy group, released a statement praising Rice as well as Obama's decision to make the post of U.N. ambassador a Cabinet-level position once again—as it was during the Clinton years.
  8. ^ Cooper, Helene (November 20, 2008). "Clinton Decision Holding Up Other Obama Choices". New York Times. Retrieved February 9, 2009. Ms. Rice could get the post of United States ambassador to the United Nations, a cabinet-level position under President Clinton. President Bush downgraded the position when he came into office
  9. ^ Walker, Hunter. "President Trump announces his full Cabinet roster." Yahoo News. 2017-02-07. Retrieved 2017-02-08.
  10. ^ Kristen Welker; Geoff Bennett; Daniel Barnes (2018-12-07). "U.N. ambassador to no longer be Cabinet-level position". NBC News. Retrieved 2018-12-07.
  11. ^ Chesly Manly (January 27, 1953). "Lodge Asks FBI to Screen All U.S. Aids [sic] on U.N." Chicago Tribune. Chicago Tribune Press Service.

External links

1960 United States presidential election in Colorado

The 1960 United States presidential election in Colorado took place on November 8, 1960, as part of the 1960 United States presidential election. Colorado voters chose six representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Colorado was won by incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon (R–California), running with United States Ambassador to the United Nations Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., with 54.63% of the popular vote, against Senator John F. Kennedy (D–Massachusetts), running with Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, with 44.91% of the popular vote.

1960 United States presidential election in Kentucky

The 1960 United States presidential election in Kentucky took place on November 8, 1960, as part of the 1960 United States presidential election. Kentucky voters chose ten representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Kentucky was won by incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon (R–California), running with United States Ambassador to the United Nations Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., with 53.59% of the popular vote, against Senator John F. Kennedy (D–Massachusetts), running with Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, with 46.41% of the popular vote.

1960 United States presidential election in Missouri

The 1960 United States presidential election in Missouri took place on November 8, 1960, as part of the 1960 United States presidential election. Missouri voters chose thirteen representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

In the nation's third-closest race, Missouri was won by Senator John F. Kennedy (D–Massachusetts), running with Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, with 50.26% of the popular vote against incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon (R–California), running with United States Ambassador to the United Nations Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., with 49.74% of the popular vote. As of the 2016 presidential election, this is the last election in which Osage County voted for the Democratic candidate.

1960 United States presidential election in Nebraska

The 1960 United States presidential election in Nebraska took place on November 8, 1960, as part of the 1960 United States presidential election. Nebraska voters chose six representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Nebraska was won by incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon (R–California), running with United States Ambassador to the United Nations Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., with 62.07% of the popular vote, against Senator John F. Kennedy (D–Massachusetts), running with Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, with 37.93% of the popular vote.With 62.07% of the popular vote, Nebraska would prove to be Nixon's strongest state in the 1960 election.

1960 United States presidential election in North Carolina

The 1960 United States presidential election in North Carolina took place on November 8, 1960, as part of the 1960 United States presidential election. North Carolina voters chose fourteen representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

North Carolina was won by Senator John F. Kennedy (D–Massachusetts), running with Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, with 52.11% of the popular vote against incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon (R–California), running with United States Ambassador to the United Nations Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., with 47.89% of the popular vote.

1960 United States presidential election in North Dakota

The 1960 United States presidential election in North Dakota took place on November 8, 1960, as part of the 1960 United States presidential election. North Dakota voters chose four representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

North Dakota was won by incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon (R–California), running with United States Ambassador to the United Nations Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., with 55.42% of the popular vote, against Senator John F. Kennedy (D–Massachusetts), running with Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, with 44.52% of the popular vote.

1960 United States presidential election in Tennessee

The 1960 United States presidential election in Tennessee took place on November 8, 1960, as part of the 1960 United States presidential election. Tennessee voters chose eleven representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Tennessee was won by incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon (R–California), running with United States Ambassador to the United Nations Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., with 52.92% of the popular vote, against Senator John F. Kennedy (D–Massachusetts), running with Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, with 45.77% of the popular vote.

1960 United States presidential election in West Virginia

The 1960 United States presidential election in West Virginia took place on November 8, 1960, as part of the 1960 United States presidential election. West Virginia voters chose eight representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

West Virginia was won by Senator John F. Kennedy (D–Massachusetts), running with Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, with 52.73% of the popular vote against incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon (R–California), running with United States Ambassador to the United Nations Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., with 47.27% of the popular vote.

David Pressman

David Pressman (born 1977) is the United States Ambassador to the United Nations for Special Political Affairs. He was nominated by President Obama, and confirmed by the Senate on September 17, 2014. Ambassador Pressman represents the United States at the United Nations Security Council and in related negotiations.

James B. Cunningham

James Blair Cunningham (born 1952) is an American diplomat and the former United States Ambassador to Afghanistan. Cunningham has served in various diplomat positions since graduating from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University in 1974. Positions that he has previously held include Chief of Staff to NATO Secretary General Manfred Woerner (1989-1990), Deputy Advisor for Political Affairs at the United States Mission to the United Nations (1990-1992), Director of the State Department's Office of European Security and Political Affairs (1993-1995), Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of the United States in Rome (1996-2001), Acting United States Ambassador to the United Nations (2001), Consul General of the United States to Hong Kong and Macau (2005-2008) and the United States Ambassador to Israel (2008-2011).

John Danforth

John Claggett Danforth (born September 5, 1936) is a retired American politician who began his career in 1968 as the Attorney General of Missouri and served three terms as United States Senator from Missouri. In 2004, he served briefly as United States Ambassador to the United Nations. Danforth is an ordained Episcopal priest.

Kirkpatrick Doctrine

The Kirkpatrick Doctrine was the doctrine expounded by United States Ambassador to the United Nations Jeane Kirkpatrick in the early 1980s based on her 1979 essay, "Dictatorships and Double Standards". The doctrine was used to justify the U.S. foreign policy of supporting Third World anti-communist dictatorships during the Cold War.

Permanent representative

A permanent representative is a diplomat who is the head of a country’s diplomatic mission to an international organisation.Organizations that receive permanent representatives from their member states include the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, NATO, the European Union, the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, and the Organization of American States. Permanent representatives can be sent to subunits or field offices of an organization. For example, in addition to the permanent representatives sent to the United Nations headquarters in New York City, UN member states also appoint permanent representatives to other UN offices, such as those in Geneva, Nairobi, and Vienna.

Permanent representatives are often informally described as ambassadors. However, although a permanent representative typically holds the diplomatic rank of an ambassador, because he or she is accredited to an international organisation the official title is permanent representative. For example, the United States Ambassador to the United Nations is technically called the Permanent Representative to the UN, even though he or she is widely referred to as an ambassador.

Diplomatic representatives of the Pope are titled apostolic nuncio or papal nuncio, which is equivalent to permanent representative.Some international organizations, such as UNESCO, use the title permanent delegate to refer to the head of a diplomatic mission accredited to them.

Randhawa

Randhawa is a Jat clan in the Punjab Region of India and Pakistan.Notable people who bear the name and may or may not be associated with the clan include:

Afzal Ahsan Randhawa, Pakistani writer

Arfa Abdul Karim Randhawa, Pakistani child prodigy, better known as Arfa Karim

Dara Singh Randhawa, Indian wrestler and actor

Gurbachan Singh Randhawa, Indian athlete

Guriq Randhawa, English cricketer

Guru Randhawa, Indian singer and songwriter from Gurdaspur, Punjab, India

Gurman Randhawa, English cricketer

Jesse Randhawa, Indian actress and model

Jyoti Randhawa, Indian golfer

Karishma Randhawa, Indian actress

Kuljeet Randhawa, Indian actress and model

Kulraj Randhawa, Indian actress

Mahabali Shera (born Amanpreet Singh Randhawa), Indian wrestler

Mohinder Singh Randhawa, Indian administrator, historian and botanist

Nikki Haley, née Randhawa, United States Ambassador to the United Nations

Ravinder Randhawa, British writer

Saadhika Randhawa, Indian actor

Sardara Singh Randhawa, Indian wrestler and actor

Shaad Randhawa, Indian actor

Sukhjinder Singh Randhawa, Indian politician

Surjit Singh Randhawa, Indian field hockey player

Residence of the United States Ambassador to the United Nations

The residence of the United States Ambassador to the United Nations is the official residence of the United States Ambassador to the United Nations. It was previously located in a suite of rooms on the 42nd floor of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City leased by the U.S. Department of State, until shortly after the Chinese Anbang Insurance Company purchased the Waldorf-Astoria in 2015. Described in press reports as "palatial", the establishment of the former residence in 1947 marked the first time in history that an ambassadorial residence had been located in a hotel.

Tony P. Hall

Tony Patrick Hall (born January 16, 1942) is an American politician who served in the U.S. House of Representatives for more than twenty years representing the state of Ohio as a Democrat.

From 2002 to 2006, Hall served as United States Ambassador to the United Nations Agencies for Food and Agriculture, and as chief of the United States Mission to the UN Agencies in Rome, which includes the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Food Programme, and the International Fund for Agricultural Development. Subsequently, Hall worked on a Middle East peace initiative in collaboration with the Center for the Study of the Presidency.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 2016

United Nations Security Council Resolution 2016 was unanimously adopted on 27 October 2011. Recognizing the "positive developments" in Libya after the Libyan Civil War and the death of Muammar Gaddafi, the resolution set a date of termination for the provisions of Security Council Resolution 1973 which allowed states to undertake "all necessary measures" to protect civilians and which formed the legal basis for military intervention by a number of foreign states. The termination date was set at 23:59, Libyan local time on 31 October 2011. The no-fly zone created with Resolution 1973 was also lifted on that date.The Foreign Secretary of the United Kingdom, William Hague, called the resolution a "milestone towards a peaceful, democratic future for Libya". The United States ambassador to the United Nations, Susan Rice, said history would regard the intervention as "a proud chapter in the Security Council's experience". Russia's ambassador to the UN, Vitaly Churkin, said "we expect the NATO council to act in accordance with this decision".

United States Ambassador to the United Nations Agencies for Food and Agriculture

The United States Ambassador to the United Nations Agencies for Food and Agriculture is the head of the United States Mission to the UN Agencies in Rome and thus is the United States ambassador to the three United Nations agencies for food and agriculture located in Rome, Italy: the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the International Fund for Agricultural Development, and the World Food Programme. One formal title of this position is United States Representative to the United Nations Agencies for Food and Agriculture with the rank of Ambassador during his tenure of service.

United States Ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Council

The United States Ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Council is the diplomatic representative of the United States to the United Nations Human Rights Council. The position is located within the United States Mission to the United Nations and Other International Organizations located at Geneva, Switzerland. A formal title for the position is United States Representative to the United Nations Human Rights Council, with rank of Ambassador.Up until 2006, the position was commonly known as the United States Ambassador to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, as it was associated to a predecessor organization, the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. It was more formally called United States Representative to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, and did not at first have ambassadorial rank but subsequently attained it.

United States Ambassadors to the United Nations
Current countries
Defunct countries
Other places
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Ambassadors-at-large
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Americas
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Europe
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