Unicycle hockey

Unicycle hockey is a team sport, similar to roller or inline hockey, except that each player must be mounted on a unicycle to play the ball. A team is composed of five players (plus substitutes), but there is no dedicated goalkeeper role (although one player usually stays back in that position).[1]

The governing body for unicycle hockey is the International Unicycling Federation which publishes the rules for all unicycle sports. The most recent set of rules for unicycle hockey was published in 2015.[2]

The court used is between 35 and 45 metres in length, and 20 to 25 metres wide. It should have either beveled or rounded corners, and barriers on all sides. The goals are also set back from the end walls so that players can go behind them, similarly to ice hockey.

Any stick which is legal for ice hockey, other than that of a goalkeeper, can be used. The unicycles can have a maximum wheel diameter of 24 inches (61 cm) and a tennis ball is used.

Unicycle hockey
Unicycle Hockey Eurocycle 2
Highest governing bodyInternational Unicycling Federation
First playedUnknown (first record: 1925 in the film Varieté)
Characteristics
ContactNo (mild contact is tolerated)
Team members5 players per side (plus substitutes)
Mixed genderAllowed
EquipmentUnicycle, Ice hockey stick and a ball
Presence
Olympicnon-Olympic
Unicycle Hockey, 2012

Competition

There are three national unicycle hockey leagues: Australia,[3] with 8 teams in 2016; Germany,[4] with 53 teams; Switzerland,[5] with approximately 20 teams

In addition to these leagues, there are clubs and teams in other countries, including England,[6] France, Denmark, Sweden, Hong Kong, Singapore[7], Taiwan and Korea.[8]

International competition in the sport takes place at the biennial Unicon world championships and regional tournaments including Eurocycle and APUC.

History

The first known instance of hockey on unicycles is a short segment in the 1925 film Variety, which shows two performers on a stage, one using a field hockey stick to push a ball around.[9]

In 1960, unicycle hockey was mentioned as one of the activities of the Albuquerque Unicycle Club, founded in 1957, and then the only known unicycle club in the United States. In 1971, the game was being played in Japan.

In 1976, a unicycle hockey club called 'Wheel People' was founded in California and ran for about ten years. In 1985, LaHiMo became the first German unicycle hockey club, based in Langenfeld.[10] The sport spread to the UK, with a national competition in 1988 at Covent Garden in London. In 1990, Jens Stemminger founded the Uniwheelers in Bremen. Radlos was the third German club, in Frankfurt from 1991, and others soon followed, leading to the foundation of the German league, still the world's largest. [11]

In the early 1990s, the sport was introduced to Switzerland by Jojo Mühlmeyer, a Lahimo/Radlos pioneer.

The first European championship was held at the European Juggling Convention in Leeds in the United Kingdom, in September 1993.

The following year, the first unicycle hockey world championships took place at Unicon VII in Minneapolis, in the United States, won by Germany. Every Unicon since has included a hockey championships. The current world champions, from Unicon XIX in Ansan, Korea, are Swiss Team.[12]

External links

References

  1. ^ http://www.rolf-sander.net/uni/faq.html
  2. ^ IUF Rules 2015
  3. ^ Australian Unicycle Hockey League
  4. ^ German unicycle hockey league
  5. ^ Swiss Unicycle hockey league
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ The Singapore Unicyclists
  8. ^ List of unicycle hockey clubs
  9. ^ Unicycle Hockey History, unicyclehockey.com
  10. ^ Unicycle Hockey World Championships 1998 at UNICON IX
  11. ^ Unicycle Hockey - History, HockeyGods
  12. ^ Unicon 19 - Results
APUC

The Asia-Pacific Unicycle Competition (or APUC for short) is a regional unicycling games event that is held biennially, in alternative years from the Unicycling World Championships Unicon. The event has typically been held over a weekend where competitors from around Asia-Pacific gather in various unicycle games.

Eurocycle

Eurocycle is a European unicycle meeting.

The events offered vary between Eurocycles, they usually include hockey, basketball, races, muni, and artistic.

Hockey

Hockey is a sport in which two teams play against each other by trying to manoeuvre a ball or a puck into the opponent's goal using a hockey stick. There are many types of hockey such as bandy, field hockey, and ice hockey.

In most of the world, hockey refers to field hockey, while in Canada, the United States, Finland, Sweden, Latvia, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, hockey usually refers to ice hockey.

Kī-o-rahi

Kī-o-rahi is a ball sport played in New Zealand with a small round ball called a 'kī'. It is a fast-paced game incorporating skills similar to rugby union, netball and touch. Two teams of seven players play on a circular field divided into zones, and score points by touching the 'pou' (boundary markers) and hitting a central 'tupu' or target. The game is played with varying rules (e.g. number of people, size of field, tag ripping rules etc.) depending on the geographic area it is played in. A process called Tatu, before the game, determines which rules the two teams will use.

In 2005 kī-o-rahi was chosen to represent New Zealand by global fast-food chain McDonald's as part of its 'Passport to Play' programme to teach physical play activities in 31,000 American schools.

The programme will give instruction in 15 ethnic games to seven million primary school children.The New Zealand kī-o-rahi representative organisation, Kī-o-Rahi Akotanga Iho, formed with men's and women's national teams, completed a 14 match tour of Europe in September and October 2010. The men's team included 22-test All Black veteran Wayne Shelford who led the team to a 57–10 test win against Kī-o-Rahi Dieppe Organisation, the French Kī-o-Rahi federation.

Shelford's kī-o-rahi test jersey made him the first kī-o-rahi/rugby double international for NZ. The women's team coached by Andrea Cameron (Head of PE at Tikipunga High School) also won by 33–0. These were the first historic test matches between NZ and France.

List of sports

The following is a list of sports/games, divided by category.

According to the World Sports Encyclopedia (2003), there are 8,000 indigenous sports and sporting games.

Power hockey

Power Hockey is a competitive, fast-paced hockey game based on the use of a power wheelchair. The foundation of the sport derives from ice hockey and floor hockey, but with adapted rules to enable people with disabilities, who use a power wheelchair, to play and be active in a competitive team setting. The sport is also referred to as Electric Wheelchair Hockey or Electric Wheelchair Floorball in various parts of the world.

Quidditch (sport)

Quidditch is a sport of two teams of seven players each mounted on broomsticks played on a hockey rink-sized pitch. It is based on a fictional game of the same name invented by author J. K. Rowling, which is featured in the Harry Potter series of novels and related media.[3] The game is also sometimes referred to as muggle quidditch to distinguish it from the fictional game, which involves magical elements such as flying broomsticks and enchanted balls. In the Harry Potter universe, a "muggle" is a person without the power to use magic.

The pitch is rectangular with rounded corners 55 meters (60 yards) by 33 meters (36 yards) with three hoops of varying heights at either end.[4] The sport was created in 2005 and is therefore still quite young. However, quidditch is played around the world and actively growing.[5] The ultimate goal is to have more points than the other team by the time the snitch, a tennis ball inside a long sock hanging from the shorts of an impartial official dressed in yellow, is caught. Rules of the sport are governed by the International Quidditch Association, or the IQA, and events are sanctioned by either the IQA or that nation's governing body.

To score points, chasers or keepers must get the quaffle, a slightly deflated volleyball, into one of three of the opposing hoops which scores the team 10 points.[6] To impede the quaffle from advancing down the pitch, chasers and keepers are able to tackle opposing chasers and keepers at the same time as beaters using their bludgers—dodgeballs—to take out opposing players. Once a player is hit by an opposing bludger, that player must dismount their broom, drop any ball being held, and return to and touch their hoops before being allowed back into play.[7] The game is ended once the snitch is caught by one of the seekers, awarding that team 30 points.[8]A team consists of minimum seven (maximum 21) players, of which six are always on the pitch, those being the three chasers, one keeper, and two beaters. Besides the seeker who is off-pitch, the six players are required to abide by the gender rule, which states that a team may have a maximum of four players who identify as the same gender, making quidditch one of the few sports that not only offers a co-ed environment but an open community to those who do not identify with the gender binary.[10] Matches or games often run about 30 to 40 minutes but tend to be subject to varying lengths of time due to the unpredictable nature of the snitch catch. If the score at the end of the match including the 30 point snitch catch is tied (such that the team that caught the snitch was 30 points behind the other), the game moves to overtime where the snitch is constrained to the pitch's dimensions and the game ends after five minutes or when the snitch is legally caught.

Unicon (unicycling)

Unicon, previously known as UNICON, is the World Unicycling Convention and Championships sanctioned by the International Unicycling Federation (IUF).

The IUF sanctions a biennial world unicycling convention and competition, the major event on the international unicycling calendar. Events include artistic (such as group, pairs, individual), track racing (such as 100 metres, 400 metres, 800 metres, 30 metres walk the wheel, 50 metres one-foot), road races (such as 10 kilometres, marathon), stillstand, slalom, muni (cross-country, uphill, downhill), street, trials, flatland, basketball and hockey.

Unicycle

A unicycle is a vehicle that touches the ground with only one wheel. The most common variation has a frame with a saddle, and has a pedal-driven direct drive. A two speed hub is commercially available for faster unicycling. Unicycling is practiced professionally in circuses, by street performers, in festivals, and as a hobby. Unicycles have also been used to create new sports such as unicycle hockey. In recent years, unicycles have also been used in mountain unicycling, an activity similar to mountain biking or trials.

Variety (1925 film)

Variety (German: Varieté [ˌvaʀi̯eˈte], also known by the alternative titles Jealousy or Vaudeville) is a 1925 silent drama film directed by Ewald Andre Dupont based on the novel Der Eid des Stephan Huller (1923) by Felix Hollaender.

In the film, Jannings portrays "Boss Huller", a former trapeze artist who was badly injured in a fall from the high wire and who now runs a seedy carnival with his wife (Maly Delschaft) and their child. Huller insists that the family take in a beautiful stranger (Lya De Putti) as a new sideshow dancer, with whom he develops a new trapeze number. He falls in love with the new star, and the story ends in tragedy.

The film was heavily censored when it was released in America (except New York), by excising the entire first reel, "thus destroying the motivation of the tragedy, implying that the acrobat was married to his Eurasian temptress."The trapeze scenes are set in the Berlin Wintergarten theatre. The camera swings from long shot to close-up, like the acrobats.The story was loosely remade by Dupont as the 1931 sound film Salto Mortale.

Basket sports
Football codes
Bat-and-ball games
Stick and ball sports
Net sports
Other sports

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