Ukrainian Census (2001)

The first Ukrainian census was carried out by State Statistics Committee of Ukraine on 5 December 2001, twelve years after the last Soviet Union census in 1989 and was so far the only census held in independent Ukraine.[1] The total population recorded was 48,457,100 persons, of which the urban population was 32,574,500 (67.2%), rural: 15,882,600 (32.8%), male: 22,441,400 (46.3%), female: 26,015,700 (53.7%). The total permanent population recorded was 48,241,000 persons.

Settlements

There were 454 cities nine of them with population over 500,000. The census recorded over 130 nationalities.

Future censuses

The next Ukrainian census is planned to be held in 2020.[1]

Actual population by regions

Region Population, 2001
(thousands)
Population, 1989
(thousands)
Change
(percent)
Autonomous Republic of Crimea 2033.7 2063.6 99
Cherkasy Oblast 1402.9 1531.5 92
Chernihiv Oblast 1245.3 1415.9 88
Chernivtsi Oblast 922.8 938.0 98
Dnipropetrovsk Oblast 3567.6 3881.2 92
Donetsk Oblast 4841.1 5332.4 91
Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast 1409.8 1423.5 99
Kharkiv Oblast 2914.2 3195.0 91
Kherson Oblast 1175.1 1240.0 95
Khmelnytskyi Oblast 1430.8 1527.1 94
Kirovohrad Oblast 1133.1 1239.4 91
Kiev Oblast 1827.9 1940.0 94
Luhansk Oblast 2546.2 2862.7 89
Lviv Oblast 2626.5 2747.7 94
Mykolaiv Oblast 1264.7 1330.6 95
Odessa Oblast 2469.0 2642.6 93
Poltava Oblast 1630.1 1753.0 93
Rivne Oblast 1173.3 1169.7 100
Sumy Oblast 1299.7 1432.7 91
Ternopil Oblast 1142.4 1168.9 98
Vinnytsia Oblast 1772.4 1932.6 92
Volyn Oblast 1060.7 1061.2 100
Zakarpattia Oblast 1258.3 1252.3 100
Zaporizhzhia Oblast 1929.2 2081.8 93
Zhytomyr Oblast 1389.5 1545.4 90
Kiev (city) 2611.3 2602.8 100
Sevastopol (city) 379.5 395.0 96
Source: Total number of actual population. 2001 Ukrainian Population Census. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine

Urban and rural population by regions

Region Urban Population
(thousands)
Rural Population
(thousands)
Urban Population
(percent)
Rural Population
(percent)
Autonomous Republic of Crimea 1274.3 759.4 63 37
Cherkasy Oblast 753.6 649.3 54 46
Chernihiv Oblast 727.2 518.1 58 42
Chernivtsi Oblast 373.5 549.3 40 60
Dnipropetrovsk Oblast 2960.3 607.3 83 17
Donetsk Oblast 4363.6 477.5 90 10
Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast 593.0 816.8 42 58
Kharkiv Oblast 2288.7 625.5 79 21
Kherson Oblast 706.2 468.9 60 40
Khmelnytskyi Oblast 729.6 701.2 51 49
Kirovohrad Oblast 682.0 451.1 60 40
Kiev Oblast 1053.5 774.4 58 42
Luhansk Oblast 2190.8 355.4 86 14
Lviv region 1558.7 1067.8 59 41
Mykolaiv Oblast 838.8 425.9 66 34
Odessa Oblast 1624.6 844.4 66 34
Poltava Oblast 956.8 673.3 59 41
Rivne Oblast 549.7 623.6 47 53
Sumy Oblast 842.9 456.8 65 35
Ternopil Oblast 485.6 656.8 43 57
Vinnytsia Oblast 818.9 953.5 46 54
Volyn Oblast 533.2 527.5 50 50
Zakarpattia Oblast 466.0 792.3 37 63
Zaporizhzhia Oblast 1458.2 471.0 76 24
Zhytomyr Oblast 775.4 614.1 56 44
Kiev (city) 2611.3 - 100 -
Sevastopol (city) 358.1 21.4 94 6
Source: Urban and rural population. 2001 Ukrainian Population Census. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine'

Gender structure by regions

Region Male
(thousands)
Female
(thousands)
Male
(percent)
Female
(percent)
Autonomous Republic of Crimea 937.6 1096.1 46 54
Cherkasy Oblast 638.8 764.2 46 54
Chernihiv Oblast 565.5 679.7 45 55
Chernivtsi Oblast 432.1 490.7 47 53
Dnipropetrovsk Oblast 1643.3 1924.3 46 54
Donetsk Oblast 2219.9 2621.2 46 54
Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast 665.2 744.5 47 53
Kharkiv Oblast 1339.5 1574.7 46 54
Kherson Oblast 548.5 626.6 47 53
Khmelnytskyi Oblast 659.9 770.8 46 54
Kirovohrad Oblast 520.8 612.2 46 54
Kiev Oblast 845.9 982.0 46 54
Luhansk Oblast 1169.9 1376.3 46 54
Lviv Oblast 1245.1 1381.4 47 53
Mykolaiv Oblast 588.2 676.6 47 53
Odessa Oblast 1155.4 1313.6 47 53
Poltava Oblast 747.4 882.7 46 54
Rivne Oblast 555.6 617.7 47 53
Sumy Oblast 593.8 705.9 46 54
Ternopil Oblast 530.2 612.3 46 54
Vinnytsia Oblast 809.6 962.8 46 54
Volyn Oblast 500.1 560.6 47 53
Zakarpattia Oblast 605.5 652.8 48 52
Zaporizhzhia Oblast 886.6 1042.6 46 54
Zhytomyr Oblast 644.8 744.7 46 54
Kiev (city) 1218.7 1392.7 47 53
Sevastopol (city) 173.5 206.0 46 54
Source: Gender structure of the population. 2001 Ukrainian Population Census. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine'

National structure

Region Population, 2001
(thousands)
Population, 2001
(percent)
Population, 1989
(percent)
Change
(percent)
Ukrainians 37541.7 77.8 72.7 100.3
Russians 8334.1 17.3 22.1 73.4
Belarusians 275.8 0.6 0.9 62.7
Moldavians 258.6 0.5 0.6 79.7
Crimean Tatars 248.2 0.5 0 530.0
Bulgarians 204.6 0.4 0.5 87.5
Hungarians 156.6 0.3 0.4 96.0
Romanians 151.0 0.3 0.3 112.0
Poles 144.1 0.3 0.4 65.8
Jews 103.6 0.2 0.9 21.3
Armenians 99.9 0.2 0.1 180.0
Greeks 91.5 0.2 0.2 92.9
Tatars 73.3 0.2 0.2 84.4
Gipsies 47.6 0.1 0.1 99.3
Azerbaijanians 45.2 0.1 0 122.2
Georgians 34.2 0.1 0 145.3
Germans 33.3 0.1 0.1 88.0
Gagausians 31.9 0.1 0.1 99.9
Other 177.1 0.4 0.4 83.9
Source: National composition of the population. 2001 Ukrainian Population Census. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine'

National structure by regions

Note: listed are those nationalities which comprise more than 0.25% of regional population. Numbers are given in thousands.

  • Autonomous Republic of Crimea - 2,024.0 (100%)
    • Russians - 1,180.4 (58.3%)
    • Ukrainians - 492.2 (24.3%)
    • Crimean Tatars - 243.4 (12.0%)
    • Belarusians - 29.2 (1.4%)
    • Tatars - 11.0 (0.5%)
    • Armenians - (0.4%)
  • Cherkasy Oblast - 1,398.3 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,301.2 (93.1%)
    • Russians - 75.6 (5.4%)
    • Belarusians - 3.9 (0.3%)
  • Chernihiv Oblast - 1,236.1 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,155.4 (93.5%)
    • Russians - 62.2 (5.0%)
    • Belarusians - 7.1 (0.6%)
  • Chernivtsi Oblast - 919.0 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 689.1 (75.0%)
    • Romanians - 114.6 (12.5%)
    • Moldavians - 67.2 (7.3%)
    • Russians - 37.9 (4.1%)
    • Poles - 3.3 (0.4%)
  • Dnipropetrovsk Oblast - 3,561.2 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 2,825.8 (79.3%)
    • Russians - 627.5 (17.6%)
    • Belarusians - 29.5 (0.8%)
    • Jews - 13.7 (0.4%)
    • Armenians - 10.6 (0.3%)
  • Donetsk Oblast - 4,825.6 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 2,744.1 (56.9%)
    • Russians - 1,844.4 (38.2%)
    • Greeks - 77.5 (1.6%)
    • Belarusians - 44.5 (0.9%)
    • Tatars - 19.1 (0.4%)
    • Armenians - 15.7 (0.3%)
  • Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast - 1,406.1 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,371.2 (97.5%)
    • Russians - 24.9 (1.8%)
  • Kharkiv Oblast - 2,895.8 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 2,048.7 (70.7%)
    • Russians - 742.0 (25.6%)
    • Belarusians - 14.7 (0.5%)
    • Jews - 11.5 (0.4%)
    • Armenians - 11.1 (0.4%)
  • Kherson Oblast - 1,172.7 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 961.6 (82.0%)
    • Russians - 165.2 (14.1%)
    • Belarusians - 8.1 (0.7%)
    • Tatars - 5.3 (0.5%)
    • Armenians - 4.5 (0.4%)
    • Moldavians - 4.1 (0.4%)
  • Khmelnytskyi Oblast - 1,426.6 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,339.3 (93.9%)
    • Russians - 50.7 (3.6%)
    • Poles - 23.0 (1.6%)
  • Kirovohrad Oblast - 1,125.7 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,014.6 (90.1%)
    • Russians - 83.9 (7.5%)
    • Moldavians - 8.2 (0.7%)
    • Belarusians - 5.5 (0.5%)
    • Armenians - 2.9 (0.3%)
  • Kiev Oblast - 1,821.1 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,684.8 (92.5%)
    • Russians - 109.3 (6.0%)
    • Belarusians - 8.6 (0.5%)
  • Luhansk Oblast - 2,540.2 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,472.4 (58.0%)
    • Russians - 991.8 (39.0%)
    • Belarusians - 20.5 (0.8%)
    • Tatars - 8.5 (0.3%)
    • Armenians - 6.5 (0.3%)
  • Lviv Oblast - 2,606.0 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 2,471.0 (94.8%)
    • Russians - 92.6 (3.6%)
    • Poles - 18.9 (0.7%)
  • Mykolaiv Oblast - 1,262.9 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,034.5 (81.9%)
    • Russians - 177.5 (14.1%)
    • Moldavians - 13.1 (1.0%)
    • Belarusians - 8.3 (0.7%)
    • Bulgarians - 5.6 (0.4%)
    • Armenians - 4.2 (0.3%)
    • Jews - 3.2 (0.3%)
  • Odessa Oblast - 2,455.7 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,542.3 (62.8%)
    • Russians - 508.5 (20.7%)
    • Bulgarians - 150.6 (6.1%)
    • Moldavians - 123.7 (5.0%)
    • Gagausians - 27.6 (1.1%)
    • Jews - 13.3 (0.5%)
    • Belarusians - 12.7 (0.5%)
    • Armenians - 7.4 (0.3%)
  • Poltava Oblast - 1,621.2 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,481.1 (91.4%)
    • Russians - 117.1 (7.2%)
    • Belarusians - 6.3 (0.4%)
  • Rivne Oblast - 1,171.4 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,123.4 (95.9%)
    • Russians - 30.1 (2.6%)
    • Belarusians - 11.8 (1.0%)
  • Sumy Oblast - 1,296.8 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,152.0 (88.8%)
    • Russians - 121.7 (9.4%)
    • Belarusians - 4.3 (0.3%)
  • Ternopil Oblast - 1,138.5 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,113.5 (97.8%)
    • Russians - 14.2 (1.2%)
    • Poles - 3.8 (0.3%)
  • Vinnytsia Oblast - 1,763.9 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,674.1 (94.9%)
    • Russians - 67.5 (3.8%)
  • Volyn Oblast - 1,057.2 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,025.0 (96.9%)
    • Russians - 25.1 (2.4%)
    • Belarusians - 3.2 (0.3%)
  • Zakarpattia Oblast - 1,254.6 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,010.1 (80.5%)
    • Hungarians - 151.5 (12.1%)
    • Romanians - 32.1 (2.6%)
    • Russians - 31.0 (2.5%)
    • Gypsies - 14.0 (1.1%)
    • Slovaks - 5.6 (0.5%)
    • Germans - 3.5 (0.3%)
  • Zaporizhzhia Oblast - 1,926.8 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,364.1 (70.8%)
    • Russians - 476.8 (24.7%)
    • Bulgarians - 27.7 (1.4%)
    • Belarusians - 12.6 (0.7%)
    • Armenians - 6.4 (0.3%)
    • Tatars - 5.1 (0.3%)
  • Zhytomyr Oblast - 1,389.3 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 1,255.0 (90.3%)
    • Russians - 68.9 (5.0%)
    • Poles - 49.0 (3.5%)
    • Belarusians - 4.9 (0.4%)
  • Kiev - 2,567.0 (100%)
    • Ukrainians - 2,110.8 (82.2%)
    • Russians - 337.3 (13.1%)
    • Jews - 17.9 (0.7%)
    • Belarusians - 16.5 (0.6%)
    • Poles - 6.9 (0.3%)
  • Sevastopol - 377.2 (100%)
    • Russians - 270.0 (71.6%)
    • Ukrainians - 84.4 (22.4%)
    • Belarusians - 5.8 (1.6%)
    • Tatars - 2.5 (0.7%)
    • Crimean Tatars - 1.8 (0.5%)
    • Armenians - 1.3 (0.3%)
    • Jews - 1.0 (0.3%)
Source: National composition of the population. 2001 Ukrainian Population Census. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine'

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Ukrainian population census will be held in 2020 – Cabinet decree, Interfax-Ukraine (22 December 2015)

External links

2001 Census

2001 census may refer to a census covered by:

Census in Australia#2001

2001 Bangladesh census

2001 Bolivian census

Canada 2001 Census

2001 census of Croatia

2001 Census of India

Lithuanian census of 2001

2001 Nepal census

2001 New Zealand census

South African National Census of 2001

Ukrainian Census (2001)

United Kingdom Census 2001

Albanians in Ukraine

The Albanians in Ukraine (Ukrainian: Албанці, Albantsi) are an ethnic minority group located mainly in Zaporizhia Oblast and Budjak. They descend from Albanian warriors who fought against the Ottoman Empire in the Russo-Turkish wars and were allowed to settle in the Russian Empire in the 18th century.

Boykos

Boykos (Ukrainian: Бойки, Polish: Bojkowie, Slovak: Pujďáci), or simply Highlanders (verkhovyntsi) are a Ukrainian ethnographic group located in the Carpathian Mountains of Ukraine, Slovakia, Hungary, and Poland. Along with the neighboring Lemkos and Hutsuls, the Boykos are a sub-group of the Ukrainian people and speak a dialect of the Ukrainian language. Boykos differ from their neighbors in dialect, dress, folk architecture, and customs.

In Ukraine, the classification of Boykos and other Rusyns as an East Slavic ethnicity, distinct from Ukrainians is controversial. (The deprecated and archaic term Ruthenian, while it is also derived from Rus', is ambiguous, as it technically may refer to Rusyns and Ukrainians, as well as Belarusians and even Russians, depending on the historical period.) According to the 2011 Ukraine census only 131 people identified themselves as Boykos, separate from Ukrainians. However, this figure is distorted because some people otherwise identifiable as Boykos regard that name as derogatory. In the Polish census of 2011, 258 people identified their nationality as Boyko, with 14 people listing it as their only national identification.

Censuses in Ukraine

Censuses in Ukraine (Ukrainian: Переписи населення України, Perepysy naselennya Ukrayiny) is a sporadic event that since 2001 has been conducted by the State Statistics Committee of Ukraine under the jurisdiction of the Government of Ukraine.

Chechen diaspora

The Chechen diaspora (Chechen: Нохчийн диаспора) is a term used to collectively describe the communities of Chechen people who live outside of Chechnya; this includes Chechens who live in other parts of Russia. There are also significant Chechen populations in other subdivisions of Russia (especially in Dagestan, Ingushetia and Moscow Oblast).

Outside Russia, Chechens are mainly descendants of people who had to leave Chechnya during the 19th century Caucasian War (which led to the annexation of Chechnya by the Russian Empire) and the 1944 Stalinist deportation to the Soviet Central Asia in the case of Kazakhstan. More recently, tens of thousands of Chechen refugees settled in the European Union and elsewhere as the result of the First and Second Chechen Wars, especially in the wave of emigration to the West after 2002.

Chernivtsi Oblast

Chernivtsi Oblast (Ukrainian: Чернівецька область, Černivećka oblasť, Romanian: Regiunea Cernăuți) is an oblast (province) in western Ukraine, consisting of the northern parts of the regions of Bukovina and Bessarabia. It has an international border with Romania and Moldova. The oblast is also the smallest in Ukraine.

The oblast has a large variety of landforms: the Carpathian Mountains and picturesque hills at the foot of the mountains gradually change to a broad partly forested plain situated between the Dniester and Prut rivers. Its capital is the city Chernivtsi. The region spans 8,100 km². Population: 909,893 (2015 est.)

Crimean Tatars

Crimean Tatars (Crimean Tatar: Qırımtatarlar, Къырымтатарлар or qırımlar, къырымлар; Turkish: Kırım Tatarları or kırımlar; Russian: Крымские Татары or крымцы; Ukrainian: Кримськi Татари or кримці) are a Turkic ethnic group, who are indigenous people of Crimea and formed in the Crimean Peninsula during the 13th–17th centuries, primarily from Cumans that appeared in Crimea in the 10th century, with strong contributions from all the peoples who ever inhabited Crimea. Since 2014 Crimean Tatars have been officially recognized as an indigenous people of Ukraine. Crimean Tatars are also listed among the indigenous peoples of Russia.Crimean Tatars constituted the majority of Crimea's population from the time of its ethnogenesis until the mid-19th century, and the relative largest ethnic population until the end of the 19th century. Almost immediately after the retaking of Crimea from Axis forces, in May 1944, the USSR State Defense Committee ordered the removal of all of the Tatar population from Crimea, including the families of Crimean Tatars serving in the Soviet Army – in trains and boxcars to Central Asia, primarily to Uzbekistan. Starting in 1967, some were allowed to return to Crimea, and in 1989 the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union condemned the removal of Crimean Tatars from their motherland as inhumane and lawless. Today, Crimean Tatars constitute approximately 12% of the population of Crimea. There remains a large diaspora of Crimean Tatars in Turkey and Uzbekistan.

The Crimean Tatars have been members of the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization (UNPO) since 1991.

Gagauz people

The Gagauzes are a Turkic people living mostly in southern Moldova (Gagauzia, Taraclia District, Basarabeasca District), southwestern Ukraine (Budjak), northeastern Bulgaria, Greece, Brazil, the United States and Canada. The Gagauz are Eastern Orthodox Christians.

Hertsa Raion

Hertsa Raion (Ukrainian: Герцаївський район, translit.: Hertsaiivs'kyi raion; Romanian: Raionul Herța pronounced [raˈjonul ˈhert͡sa]) is an administrative raion (district) in the southern part of Chernivtsi Oblast in western Ukraine, on the Romanian border. The region has an area of 308.7 square kilometres (119.2 sq mi) and centers on the city of Hertsa. Population: 33,067 (2015 est.)

Hungarian language

Hungarian (magyar nyelv ) is a Finno-Ugric language spoken in Hungary and parts of several neighbouring countries. It is the official language of Hungary and one of the 24 official languages of the European Union. Outside Hungary it is also spoken by communities of Hungarians in the countries that today make up Slovakia, western Ukraine (Subcarpathia), central and western Romania (Transylvania), northern Serbia (Vojvodina), northern Croatia and northern Slovenia (Mur region). It is also spoken by Hungarian diaspora communities worldwide, especially in North America (particularly the United States and Canada) and Israel. Like Finnish and Estonian, Hungarian belongs to the Uralic language family. With 13 million speakers, it is the family's largest member by number of speakers.

Izhorians

The Izhorians (Russian: Ижо́ра; ижо́рцы; sg. inkerikot, isurit, ižoralaine, inkeroine, ižora, ingermans, ingers, ingrian, pl. ižoralaizet), along with the Votes, are a Finnic ethnic group indigenous people native to Ingria. Small numbers can still be found in the western part of Ingria, between the Narva and Neva rivers in northwestern Russia.

Poles

The Poles (Polish: Polacy, pronounced [pɔˈlat͡sɨ]; singular masculine: Polak, singular feminine: Polka), commonly referred to as the Polish people, are a nation and West Slavic ethnic group native to Poland in Central Europe who share a common ancestry, culture, history, and are native speakers of the Polish language. The population of self-declared Poles in Poland is estimated at 37,394,000 out of an overall population of 38,538,000 (based on the 2011 census), of whom 36,522,000 declared Polish alone.A wide-ranging Polish diaspora (the Polonia) exists throughout Europe, the Americas, and in Australasia. Today, the largest urban concentrations of Poles are within the Warsaw and Silesian metropolitan areas.

Poland's history dates back over a thousand years, to c. 930–960 AD, when the Polans – an influential West Slavic tribe in the Greater Poland region, now home to such cities as Poznań, Gniezno, Kalisz, Konin and Września – united various Lechitic tribes under what became the Piast dynasty, thus creating the Polish state. The subsequent Christianization of Poland, in 966 CE, marked Poland's advent to the community of Western Christendom.

Poles have made important contributions to the world in every major field of human endeavor. Notable Polish émigrés – many of them forced from their homeland by historic vicissitudes – have included physicists Marie Skłodowska Curie and Joseph Rotblat, mathematician Stanisław Ulam, pianists Fryderyk Chopin and Arthur Rubinstein, actresses Helena Modjeska and Pola Negri, novelist Joseph Conrad, military leaders Tadeusz Kościuszko and Casimir Pulaski, U.S. National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski, politician Rosa Luxemburg, filmmakers Samuel Goldwyn and the Warner Brothers, cartoonist Max Fleischer, and cosmeticians Helena Rubinstein and Max Factor.

Raions of Ukraine

Raions of Ukraine (Ukrainian: Райони України) are the second level of administrative division of Ukraine, below the oblast, and are the most common division of regions of Ukraine. Equivalent type of regional subdivision are also raions in city (Raions of cities in Ukraine), and cities of regional significance (City of regional significance (Ukraine)).

Raions are one of three types of administrative divisions of regions of Ukraine and second level in the administrative divisions of Ukraine.

Romani people

The Romani (also spelled Romany , ), colloquially known as Gypsies or Roma, are an Indo-Aryan ethnic group, traditionally itinerant, living mostly in Europe and the Americas and originating from the northern Indian subcontinent, from the Rajasthan, Haryana, and Punjab regions of modern-day India.Genetic findings appear to confirm that the Romani "came from a single group that left northwestern India about 1,500 years ago." Genetic research published in the European Journal of Human Genetics "revealed that over 70% of males belong to a single lineage that appears unique to the Roma." They are a dispersed people, but their most concentrated populations are located in Europe, especially Central, Eastern and Southern Europe (including Turkey, Spain and Southern France). The Romani originated in northern India and arrived in Mid-West Asia and Europe around 1,000 years ago. They have been associated with another Indo-Aryan group, the Dom people: the two groups have been said to have separated from each other or, at least, to share a similar history. Specifically, the ancestors of both the Romani and the Dom left North India sometime between the 6th and 11th century.The Romani are widely known among English-speaking people by the exonym Gypsies (or Gipsies), which some people consider pejorative due to its connotations of illegality and irregularity. Beginning in 1888 the Gypsy Lore Society started to publish a journal that was meant to dispel rumors about their lifestyle.Since the 19th century, some Romani have also migrated to the Americas. There are an estimated one million Roma in the United States; and 800,000 in Brazil, most of whose ancestors emigrated in the 19th century from Eastern Europe. Brazil also includes a notable Romani community descended from people deported by the Portuguese Empire during the Portuguese Inquisition. In migrations since the late 19th century, Romani have also moved to other countries in South America and to Canada.In February 2016, during the International Roma Conference, the Indian Minister of External Affairs stated that the people of the Roma community were children of India. The conference ended with a recommendation to the Government of India to recognize the Roma community spread across 30 countries as a part of the Indian diaspora.The Romani language is divided into several dialects which together have an estimated number of speakers of more than two million. The total number of Romani people is at least twice as high (several times as high according to high estimates). Many Romani are native speakers of the dominant language in their country of residence or of mixed languages combining the dominant language with a dialect of Romani; those varieties are sometimes called Para-Romani.

Selkup people

The Selkup (Russian: сельку́пы), until the 1930s called Ostyak-Samoyeds (остя́ко-самое́ды), are a Samoyedic ethnic group native to Northern Siberia. They live in the northern parts of Tomsk Oblast, Krasnoyarsk Krai, Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug, and Nenets Autonomous Okrug.

State Statistics Service of Ukraine

State Statistics Committee of Ukraine (Ukrainian: Державний Комітет Статистики України, Derzhavnyi Komitet Statystyky Ukrainy) is the government agency responsible for collection and dissemination of statistics in Ukraine. For brevity it also referred to as Derzhkomstat. In 2010 the committee was transformed into the State Service of Statistics under the Ministry of Economic Development and Trade.

Turks in Ukraine

Turks in Ukraine are people of Turkish ethnicity living in Ukraine. The community is largely made of Meskhetian Turks and immigrants from Turkey.

Tysmenytsia

Tysmenytsia (Ukrainian: Тисмениця; a.k.a. Tysmenitsa, Polish: Tyśmienica) is a city, the administrative center of Tysmenytsia Raion (district) in Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast of western Ukraine. Population: 9,357 (2016 est.).

Vepsians

Veps, or Vepsians (Veps: vepsläižed), are a Finnic people who speak the Veps language, which belongs to the Finnic branch of the Uralic languages. The self-designations of these people in various dialects are vepslaine, bepslaane and (in northern dialects, southwest of Lake Onega) lüdinik and lüdilaine. According to the 2002 census, there were 8,240 Veps in Russia. Of the 281 Veps in Ukraine, 11 spoke Vepsian (Ukr. Census 2001). The most prominent researcher of the Veps in Finland is Eugene Holman. Western Vepsians have kept their language and culture. Nowadays, almost all Vepsians are fluent in Russian. The young generation in general does not speak their native language.

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