Ukraine national football team

The Ukraine national football team (Ukrainian: збірна України з футболу) is the national football team of Ukraine and is controlled by the Ukrainian Association of Football. After Ukrainian Independence and the country's breakaway from the Soviet Union, they played their first match against Hungary on 29 April 1992. The team's biggest success on the world stage was reaching the quarter-finals in the 2006 FIFA World Cup, which also marked the team's debut in the finals of a major championship.[4] As the host nation, Ukraine automatically qualified for UEFA Euro 2012.[4] Four years later, Ukraine qualified for Euro 2016 via the play-off route, the first time qualifying for a UEFA European Championship via the qualifying process, as it finished in third place in its qualifying group. This marked the first time in Ukraine's five play-off appearances that it managed to win such a tie, previously having been unsuccessful in the play-off ties for the Euro 2000, 2002 World Cup, 2010 World Cup and 2014 World Cup.

Ukraine's home ground is the Olimpiyskiy Stadium in Kiev.[5]

Ukraine
Україна
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)The Main Team (Головна команда)
Yellow-Blue (Жовто-Сині)
AssociationUkrainian Association of Football (UAF)
Українська Асоціація Футболу
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachAndriy Shevchenko[1]
CaptainAndriy Pyatov
Most capsAnatoliy Tymoshchuk (144)
Top scorerAndriy Shevchenko (48)
Home stadiumVarious
FIFA codeUKR
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 27 Increase 3 (4 April 2019)[2]
Highest11 (February 2007)
Lowest132 (September 1993)
Elo ranking
Current 21 Increase 11 (27 March 2019)[3]
Highest14 (November 2010)
Lowest69 (29 March 1995)
First international
 Ukraine 1–3 Hungary 
(Uzhhorod, Ukraine; 29 April 1992)
Biggest win
 Ukraine 9–0 San Marino 
(Lviv, Ukraine; 6 September 2013)
Biggest defeat
 Croatia 4–0 Ukraine 
(Zagreb, Croatia; 25 March 1995)
 Spain 4–0 Ukraine 
(Leipzig, Germany; 14 June 2006)
 Czech Republic 4–0 Ukraine 
(Prague, Czech Republic; 6 September 2011)
World Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2006)
Best resultQuarter-finals, 2006
European Championship
Appearances2 (first in 2012)
Best resultGroup stage, 2012 and 2016

History

Pre-independence (1925–1935)

Officially the national team of Ukraine, the national team was formed in the early 1990s and shortly after was recognized internationally. It is not widely known, however, that Ukraine previously had a national team in 1925–1935.[6][7] Just like the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic had its own national team.

The earliest record of games it played can be traced back to August 1928. A championship among the national teams of the Soviet republics as well as the Moscow city team was planned to take place in Moscow. Just before the tournament started, the Ukraine national team played two exhibition games against the Red Sports Federation team from Uruguay, one in Kharkiv (lost 1–2) and the other in Moscow (won 3–2). At the All-Soviet tournament, Ukraine played three games and reached the final where it lost to Moscow 0–1. Along the way, Ukraine managed to defeat the national teams of Belarus and Transcaucasus.

In 1929, Ukraine beat the team of Lower Austria in an exhibition match in Kharkiv, recording a score of 4–1.

In 1931, Ukraine participated in another All-Soviet championship in Moscow. It played only one game, starting from the semifinals. Ukraine lost to the national team of Transcaucasus 0–3 and was eliminated.

In 1986, Ukraine became a winner of association football tournament of the Spartakiad of Peoples of the USSR that was hosted in Ukraine when in final it beat the team of Uzbekistan (Uzbek SSR).

Official formation

Prior to Independence in 1991, Ukrainian players represented the Soviet Union national team. After the collapse of the USSR in 1991, Russia took the place of the Soviet Union national team in the qualifying tournament for the 1994 World Cup. The national team of Ukraine was did not manage to enter the 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification (the draw for the qualification was held on 8 December 1991 [8], before Ukraine joined FIFA). Meanwhile, some of the best Ukrainian players of the beginning of the 1990s (including Andrei Kanchelskis, Viktor Onopko, Sergei Yuran, Yuriy Nikiforov, Ilya Tsymbalar and Oleg Salenko) chose to play for Russia, as it was named the official successor of the Soviet Union.

The Soviet Union's five-year UEFA coefficient, despite being earned in part by Ukrainian players (for example, in the final of the last successful event, Euro 1988, 7 out of starting 11 players were Ukrainians[9]), were transferred to the direct descendant of the Soviet national team – the Russia national team. As a result, a crisis was created for both the national team and the domestic league. When Ukraine returned to international football in late 1994, it did so as absolute beginners.[10]

In the following years, the Ukrainian team improved, showcasing talents like Andriy Shevchenko, Anatoliy Tymoshchuk, Serhiy Rebrov and Oleksandr Shovkovskiy. Ukraine, however, failed to qualify for any major tournaments prior to 2006.

First official games (Prokopenko)

Soon after being accepted to FIFA and UEFA as a full member in 1992, Ukraine started its preparation for its first game. At first the head coach of the team was planned to be Valeriy Lobanovskyi, but at that time he had a current contract with the United Arab Emirates. Thus, the first manager of the team had to be chosen among members of a coaching council which consisted of Anatoliy Puzach (manager of Dynamo Kyiv), Yevhen Kucherevskyi (FC Dnipro), Yevhen Lemeshko (Torpedo Zaporizhya), Yukhym Shkolnykov (Bukovyna Chernivtsi) and Viktor Prokopenko (Chornomorets Odesa). Later, they were joined by a native of Donetsk Valeriy Yaremchenko (Shakhtar Donetsk). At the end a circle of candidates narrowed down only to three names: Puzach, Yaremnchenko and Prokopenko, the latter who eventually became the head coach.

The first game of the team it was agreed to play against Hungary on 22 April 1992 in Kiev at the Respublikansky Stadium. Due to financial issues, however, it was rearranged to 29 April and moved to the border with Hungary in Uzhhorod at the Avanhard Stadium. There was almost no preparation to the game as all "pioneers" gathered in Kiev on 27 April and the next day flew out to Uzhhorod. At the same time, the opponent, while failing to qualify for the Euro 1992, was preparing for 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification. Ukraine at that time failed to be accepted for the qualification cycle.

Unlike the Hungarian squad, players of which played alongside before and were coached by the European Cup-winning coach Emerich Jenei, the Ukrainian team lost some its better and experienced players to the CIS national football team that was playing its own friendly against the England national football team in Moscow.[11] Among those were Andrei Kanchelskis, Volodymyr Lyutyi, Sergei Yuran, Viktor Onopko, Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko and Akhrik Tsveiba (the last two would later represent Ukraine). For the game against Hungary, only Ivan Hetsko and Oleh Luzhny had previous experience of playing at international level; other players had only played for the Soviet Olympic football team, while Serhiy Kovalets played for Ukraine at the Spartakiad of People of the USSR in 1986.

The first home game was lost 1:3 with Ivan Hetsko becoming the first goalscorer in the history of national team. During the summer of 1992 the Prokopenko's team played two more away games on 27 June against the United States (0:0) and on 26 August against Hungary (1:2). After the second loss to Hungary Prokopenko resigned. Leading in its game against Hungary, Ukraine conceded two goals in the final 10 minutes.

To the scheduled against Belarus in Minsk in the fall, Ukraine has left with the Prokopenko's assistants Mykola Pavlov and Leonid Tkachenko. At the Dinama Stadium, Ukraine managed to salvaged a game by tying one a piece with a goal from Yuriy Maksymov.

Euro 96 qualification (Bazylevych)

During a winter intermission, Ukraine received a new head coach, former forward of Dynamo Kyiv Oleh Bazylevych. With Ukraine national team he made his debut in spring of 1993 in Odessa in a friendly against Israel. In the expected win, the game again was saved just 10 minutes before it ended by Serhiy Konovalov with a score 1:1. Less than a month later Ukraine finally celebrated its first victory in Vilnius in friendly against Lithuania winning it 1:2 (Viktor Leonenko and Dmytro Mykhaylenko). During summer Ukraine played one away game against Croatia which spoiled the recent success with 3:1 defeat. One of the goals for Croatian in the game scored Davor Šuker, for Ukraine his first goal scored Andriy Husin. In October 1993 Ukraine went on its first tour to the United States where it played three games against the US and Mexico. In San Diego, the game with Mexico, which Ukraine lost 1:2, was attended by over 50,000 stadium spectators. During a winter break Ukraine found out that it was seeded in the Group 4 of the UEFA Euro 1996 qualification.

In March 1994, Ukraine paid Israel a visit, but lost the game with a single penalty kick. Next there was a home game with Belarus which finally Ukraine won with confidence (3:1), even though trailing at the half. Just before its first official game at international competition which was scheduled to be played with Lithuania at home, Ukraine played couple of away games against Bulgaria and the United Arab Emirates which both ended with 1:1 tie. Another tour was scheduled right after the game with Lithuania to Korea, the national team of which was coached by a native of Kiev Anatoliy Byshovets. The opening game against Lithuania, considering the last year away victory, was expected to end positively for Ukraine. However, on 7 September 1994 at Republican Stadium Ukraine was completely stunned by Lithuania with a 0-2 defeat.[12] Both goals were yielded with couple of minutes apart in the mid of the second half and the main trouble maker for Ukraine became Valdas Ivanauskas who at time was a forward in Hamburger SV. For Korea the national team left without Bazylevych and led by his assistants whom were Mykola Pavlov and Vladimir Muntyan. With Korea, Ukraine national team played two games and both lost. A week later it returned home. On 20 September 1994 Oleh Bazylevych was highly criticized at the federation's coaching meeting and the final decision about his future at the team it was decided to obtain at the next meeting of the FFU Executive Committee few days later.[13] However, the next day Bazylevych resigned accusing Bannikov being tactless. On 24 September 1994 the Football Federation of Ukraine appointed Yozhef Sabo as an acting head coach until the end of the year.

Following the change of coach, the national team did not improve right away. The next game at home Ukraine tied with Slovenia 0:0.[14] After missing to obtain its first victory again, Ukraine rolled down to bottom of the tournament table just above Estonia. The next game was in the mid November at home against the same Estonian team and Ukraine had to win to keep any hopes in the qualification tournament. Estonians who were unable to field its best team hoped to repeat the Slovenian effort a month before.[15] Ukraine managed to overcome their defense, finally obtaining its first victory, which was 3-0. The team finished the year fourth in the table with main games yet ahead. Right after the game with Estonia, Sabo left his post and the Federation had to choose new coach.[16] On 5 January 1995 FFU confirmed Anatoliy Konkov as the new head coach.

2006 FIFA World Cup

After an unsuccessful Euro 2004 qualifying campaign, Ukraine appointed Oleg Blokhin as the national team's head coach. Despite initial skepticism about his appointment due to his previous somewhat undistinguished coaching record and general public calls for a foreign coach, Ukraine went on to qualify for their first-ever FIFA World Cup on 3 September 2005 after drawing 1–1 against Georgia in Tbilisi. In their first World Cup, in 2006, they were in the Group H together with Spain, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia. After losing 0–4 in the first match against Spain, the Ukrainians beat their other two opponents to reach the knock-out stage.

In the round of 16, Ukraine played against the winner of the Group G Switzerland, who they beat on penalties. In the quarter-finals, they were beaten 0–3 by eventual champions Italy.

UEFA Euro 2012

Ukraine national football team 20120611
Ukraine national football team in 2012

As co-hosts, Ukraine qualified automatically for Euro 2012,[4] marking their debut in the UEFA European Championship. In their opening game against Sweden, Ukraine won 2–1 in Kiev. Despite the team's efforts, however, Ukraine was eliminated after a 0–2 loss to France and a 0–1 loss to England, both in Donetsk.

2014 World Cup qualification – UEFA Group H

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts  ENG  UKR  MNE  POL  MDA  SMR
 England (Q) 10 6 4 0 31 4 +27 22 1–1 4–1 2–0 4–0 5–0
 Ukraine (A) 10 6 3 1 28 4 +24 21 0–0 0–1 1–0 2–1 9–0
 Montenegro 10 4 3 3 18 17 +1 15 1–1 0–4 2–2 2–5 3–0
 Poland 10 3 4 3 18 12 +6 13 1–1 1–3 1–1 2–0 5–0
 Moldova 10 3 2 5 12 17 −5 11 0–5 0–0 0–1 1–1 3–0
 San Marino 10 0 0 10 1 54 −53 0 0–8 0–8 0–6 1–5 0–2

Euro 2016

Ukraine vs Luxembourg 14062015 UEFA EURO 2016 Qualifying round - Group C (6)
Ukraine national football team in 2015

For the Euro 2016 qualifying round, Ukraine were drawn against Spain, Slovakia, Belarus, Macedonia and Luxembourg. The Zbirna was expected to qualify for the tournament as runners-up of the group behind Spain but, despite having won all of their games against Belarus, F.Y.R.Macedonia and Luxembourg, the Ukrainians finished third due to a lack of finishing during the top matches against Spain and Slovakia. They therefore had to face Slovenia in the play-off route and succeeded in taking revenge over the team which eliminated Ukraine at the same stage in 1999. They recorded a 2–0 win at Lviv before catching the 1–1 draw at the very end of the second game.

Ukraine convincingly won all of their preparation friendlies against Cyprus, Wales, Romania and Albania. At club level, FC Dnipro had recently reached the UEFA Europa League final in 2015, while Shakhtar Donetsk had progressed to the semi-finals one year later, as the Ukrainian clubs succeeded in sending one participant to the round of 16 of the UEFA Champions League two times in a row. Having been drawn against world champions Germany, Slavic neighbors Poland and first-time Euro competitors Northern Ireland, the Ukrainian team was expected to advance at least to the next round.

The tournament, however, turned into a surprising nightmare. Ukraine lost all of their three games, becoming the only participant in such a case and the first team to exit the tournament, also failing to score a single goal. The Ukrainians started against Germany and were beaten despite good resistance and great chances during an entertaining first half. They came close to levelling the score but were unable to deliver the final end product and were hit by Germany on the counterattack at the very end of the game. Despite a 2–0 loss, it appeared that they would prove to be a stubborn opposition for their opponents. This game was followed by a dreadful and disastrous second 2–0 loss against Northern Ireland where a goal was again conceded at injury time. The Ukrainian media mainly criticized the coach Mykhaylo Fomenko's perceived inadequate psychological preparation of the squad as much as predictable tactics which were judged as easy to break down. Ukrainians stars Andriy Yarmolenko and Yevhen Konoplyanka's underperformance was also mentioned. Ukraine were the first team eliminated from the competition at this point and lost 1–0 their last game to Poland.

2018 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group I

Ukraine started off with a home draw to eventual group leaders Iceland and an away draw to Turkey. This was followed by two home wins, 3-0 against Kosovo and 1-0 against Finland. Despite a 1-0 away loss to Croatia, they beat Finland 1-2 away and Turkey 2-0 at home. This was followed by a 2-0 away loss to Iceland and a 0-2 away win against Kosovo. Going to the last game, Ukraine stood a strong chance of qualifying for the tournament, but after a 0-2 home loss to Croatia, they failed to qualify for the play-offs for their first time.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Iceland 10 7 1 2 16 7 +9 22 Qualification to 2018 FIFA World Cup 1–0 2–0 2–0 3–2 2–0
2  Croatia 10 6 2 2 15 4 +11 20 Advance to second round 2–0 1–0 1–1 1–1 1–0
3  Ukraine 10 5 2 3 13 9 +4 17 1–1 0–2 2–0 1–0 3–0
4  Turkey 10 4 3 3 14 13 +1 15 0–3 1–0 2–2 2–0 2–0
5  Finland 10 2 3 5 9 13 −4 9 1–0 0–1 1–2 2–2 1–1
6  Kosovo 10 0 1 9 3 24 −21 1 1–2 0–6 0–2 1–4 0–1

2018–19 UEFA Nations League

Ukraine was drawn with the Czech Republic and Slovakia in League B. They beat the Czech Republic 1-2 away and Slovakia 1-0 at home, before earning a promotion with a 1-0 home win to the Czech Republic, before ending with a heavy 4-1 away loss to Slovakia.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion or relegation Ukraine Czech Republic Slovakia
1  Ukraine (P) 4 3 0 1 5 5 0 9 Promotion to League A 1–0 1–0
2  Czech Republic 4 2 0 2 4 4 0 6 1–2 1–0
3  Slovakia (R) 4 1 0 3 5 5 0 3 Relegation to League C 4–1 1–2

UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying – UEFA Group B

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification Ukraine Luxembourg Portugal Serbia Lithuania
1  Ukraine (X) 2 1 1 0 2 1 +1 4 Qualify for final tournament 10 Jun 14 Oct 7 Jun 11 Oct
2  Luxembourg 2 1 0 1 3 3 0 3 1–2 17 Nov 10 Sep 2–1
3  Portugal (X) 2 0 2 0 1 1 0 2 0–0 11 Oct 1–1 14 Nov
4  Serbia (X) 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 17 Nov 14 Nov 7 Sep 10 Jun
5  Lithuania 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 0 7 Sep 7 Jun 10 Sep 14 Oct

Stadiums

The most important matches of the Ukrainian national team are held in Kyiv's Olimpiyskiy National Sports Complex, also home of Dynamo Kyiv. New infrastructure and stadiums were built in preparation for Euro 2012, and other venues include stadiums in the cities of Donetsk, Kharkiv, Lviv, Dnipro, Odesa. The alternative stadiums are: Donbass Arena (Donetsk), Metalist Stadium (Kharkiv), Arena Lviv (Lviv), Dnipro-Arena (Dnipro), Chornomorets Stadium (Odesa).

During the Soviet time era (before 1991), only two stadiums in Ukraine were used in official games, the Olimpiysky NSC in Kiev (known then as Republican Stadium) and the Lokomotiv Stadium in Simferopol.

Recent and forthcoming matches

The following matches were played or are scheduled to be played by the national team in the current or upcoming seasons.

Player records

Most capped players

Андрій Шевченко та Анатолій Тимощук.jpeg
Anatoliy Tymoshchuk and Andriy Shevchenko being honored by UEFA in 2011 for their 100th cap. They are the first and second, respectively, most capped players in the history of Ukraine.
Andriy Shevchenko Euro 2012 vs Sweden detail1
Andriy Shevchenko is the top scorer in the history of Ukraine with 48 goals.

As of 25 March 2019[a]
Players in bold are still active, at least at club level.

# Player Career Caps Goals
1 Anatoliy Tymoshchuk 2000–2016 144 4
2 Andriy Shevchenko 1995–2012 111 48
3 Ruslan Rotan 2003–2018 100 8
4 Oleh Husyev 2003–2016 98 13
5 Oleksandr Shovkovskiy 1994–2012 92 0
6 Andriy Pyatov 2007– 86 0
7 Andriy Yarmolenko 2009– 79 36
Yevhen Konoplyanka 2010– 79 19
9 Serhiy Rebrov 1992–2006 75 15
10 Andriy Voronin 2002–2012 74 8

Top goalscorers

As of 25 March 2018

# Player Career Goals Caps Average
1 Andriy Shevchenko 1995–2012 48 111 0.43
2 Andriy Yarmolenko 2009– 36 79 0.46
3 Yevhen Konoplyanka 2010– 19 79 0.24
4 Serhiy Rebrov 1992–2006 15 75 0.2
5 Oleh Husyev 2003–2016 13 98 0.13
6 Serhiy Nazarenko 2003–2012 12 56 0.21
7 Yevhen Seleznyov 2008– 11 57 0.19
8 Andriy Vorobey 2000–2008 9 68 0.13
Andriy Husin 1993–2006 9 71 0.13
10 Tymerlan Huseynov 1993–1997 8 14 0.57
Artem Kravets 2011– 8 22 0.36
Artem Milevskiy 2006–2012 8 50 0.16
Andriy Voronin 2002–2012 8 74 0.11
Ruslan Rotan 2003–2018 8 100 0.08

Top 10 goalkeepers

As of 25 March 2019

# Player Career Games Wins GA GAA
1 Oleksandr Shovkovskiy 1994–2012 92 38 80 0.87
2 Andriy Pyatov 2007– 86 43 65 0.756
3 Oleh Suslov 1994–1997 12 7 15 1.25
4 Vitaliy Reva 2001–2003 9 3 10 1.111
5 Andriy Dykan 2010–2012 8 5 11 1.375
Maksym Levytskyi 2000–2002 8 1 10 1.25
7 Dmytro Tyapushkin 1994–1995 7 1 11 1.571
8 Valeriy Vorobyov 1994–1999 6 3 2 0.333
Denys Boyko 2014– 6 3 6 1
10 Dmytro Shutkov 1993–2003 5 2 4 0.8
Vyacheslav Kernozenko 2000–2008 5 2 8 1.6

Captains

As of 25 March 2019[20]

# Player Career Captain Caps Total Caps
1 Andriy Shevchenko 1995–2012 58 111
2 Anatoliy Tymoshchuk 2000–2016 41 144
3 Oleh Luzhny 1992–2003 39 52
4 Ruslan Rotan 2003–2018 23 100
5 Yuriy Kalitvintsev 1995–1999 13 22
Oleksandr Holovko 1995–2004 13 58
7 Oleksandr Shovkovskiy 1994–2012 12 92
8 Andriy Pyatov 2007– 9 86
9 Oleksandr Kucher 2006– 7 56
10 Yevhen Konoplyanka 2010– 5 79

Managers

Last updated on 25 March 2019.[21]

Manager Nation Ukraine career Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Win % Qualifying cycle Final tour
Viktor Prokopenko Ukraine 1992 3 0 1 2 2 5 0
Mykola Pavlov (caretaker) Ukraine 1992 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
Oleh Bazylevych Ukraine 1993–1994 11 4 3 4 13 14 36.36 1996
Mykola Pavlov (caretaker) Ukraine 1994 2 0 0 2 0 3 0
Yozhef Sabo Ukraine 1994 2 1 1 0 3 0 50 1996
Anatoliy Konkov Ukraine 1995 7 3 0 4 8 13 42.86 1996
Yozhef Sabo Ukraine 1996–1999 32 15 11 6 44 26 46.88 1998, 2000
Valeriy Lobanovskyi Ukraine 2000–2001 18 6 7 5 20 20 33.33 2002
Leonid Buryak Ukraine 2002–2003 19 5 6 8 18 23 26.32 2004
Oleg Blokhin Ukraine 2003–2007 46 21 14 11 65 40 45.65 2006, 2008 2006
Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko Ukraine 2008–2009 21 12 5 4 31 16 57.14 2010
Myron Markevych[22] Ukraine 2010 4 3 1 0 9 3 75
Yuriy Kalytvyntsev (caretaker)[23] Ukraine 2010–2011 8 1 5 2 10 13 12.5
Oleg Blokhin[24] Ukraine 2011–2012 18 7 3 8 27 28 38.89 2012,[25] 2014 2012
Andriy Bal (caretaker)[26] Ukraine 2012 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 2014
Oleksandr Zavarov (caretaker) Ukraine 2012 1 1 0 0 1 0 100
Mykhaylo Fomenko[27] Ukraine 2012–2016 37 24 6 7 67 22 64.86 2014, 2016 2016
Andriy Shevchenko Ukraine 2016– 24 13 7 4 32 20 54.17 2018

Coaching staff

Currently approved:

Head coach Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko
Coach Italy Mauro Tassotti
Coach Italy Andrea Maldera
Coach Ukraine Oleksandr Shovkovskiy
Observer Ukraine Volodymyr Onyshchenko
Goalkeeping coach Spain Pedro Luis Jaro
Fitness coach Ukraine Ivan Bashtovyi

Players

Current squad

The following players have been called up for a UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying matches against  Serbia and  Luxembourg on 7 and 10 June 2019 respectively.[28]
Players' records are accurate as of 25 March 2019 after the match against Luxembourg.[29][30]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
12 GK Andriy Pyatov (Captain) 28 June 1984 (age 34) 86 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
1 GK Denys Boyko 29 January 1988 (age 31) 6 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
23 GK Andriy Lunin 11 February 1999 (age 20) 3 0 Spain Leganés

2 DF Bohdan Butko 13 January 1991 (age 28) 32 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
21 DF Oleksandr Karavayev 2 June 1992 (age 26) 20 1 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk
22 DF Mykola Matviyenko 2 May 1996 (age 23) 17 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
4 DF Serhiy Kryvtsov 15 March 1991 (age 28) 9 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
3 DF Eduard Sobol 20 April 1995 (age 24) 9 0 Czech Republic Jablonec
5 DF Mykyta Burda 24 April 1995 (age 24) 7 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
13 DF Vitaliy Mykolenko 29 May 1999 (age 19) 3 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
DF Ihor Plastun 20 August 1990 (age 28) 2 0 Belgium Gent
DF Artem Shabanov 7 March 1992 (age 27) 1 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
DF Vasyl Kravets 20 August 1997 (age 21) 0 0 Spain Leganés

7 MF Andriy Yarmolenko 23 October 1989 (age 29) 79 36 England West Ham United
10 MF Yevhen Konoplyanka 29 September 1989 (age 29) 79 19 Germany Schalke 04
6 MF Taras Stepanenko 8 August 1989 (age 29) 51 3 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
17 MF Oleksandr Zinchenko 15 December 1996 (age 22) 25 2 England Manchester City
16 MF Serhiy Sydorchuk 2 May 1991 (age 28) 24 2 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
9 MF Roman Bezus 26 September 1990 (age 28) 20 4 Belgium Gent
8 MF Ruslan Malinovskyi 4 May 1993 (age 26) 19 2 Belgium Genk
MF Viktor Kovalenko 14 February 1996 (age 23) 19 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
15 MF Viktor Tsyhankov 15 November 1997 (age 21) 12 1 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
11 MF Marlos 7 June 1988 (age 30) 12 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
MF Ivan Petryak 13 March 1994 (age 25) 5 0 Hungary Ferencvárosi
MF Mykola Shaparenko 4 October 1998 (age 20) 4 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
MF Serhiy Bolbat 13 June 1993 (age 25) 2 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
MF Volodymyr Shepelyev 1 June 1997 (age 21) 1 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
MF Maryan Shved 16 July 1997 (age 21) 1 0 Scotland Celtic

FW Artem Kravets 3 June 1989 (age 29) 22 8 Turkey Kayserispor
FW Artem Besyedin 31 March 1996 (age 23) 10 1 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
18 FW Roman Yaremchuk 27 November 1995 (age 23) 6 0 Belgium Gent

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up for the team within the last 12 months.[31][32][33][34][35][36][37]

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up

DF Oleksandr Svatok 27 September 1994 (age 24) 0 0 Croatia Hajduk Split v.  Turkey, 20 November 2018
DF Yaroslav Rakitskiy 3 August 1989 (age 29) 53 5 Russia Zenit Saint Petersburg v.  Czech Republic, 16 October 2018
DF Oleh Danchenko 1 August 1994 (age 24) 0 0 Russia Yenisey Krasnoyarsk v.  Slovakia, 9 September 2018
DF Andriy Tsurikov INJ 5 October 1992 (age 26) 0 0 Ukraine Oleksandriya v.  Slovakia, 9 September 2018
DF Yevhen Khacheridi 28 July 1987 (age 31) 51 3 Greece PAOK v.  Czech Republic, 6 September 2018 WD
DF Pavlo Lukyanchuk 19 May 1996 (age 23) 0 0 Hungary Kisvárda v.  Albania, 3 June 2018

MF Vitaliy Buyalskyi INJ 6 January 1993 (age 26) 6 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Luxembourg, 25 March 2019
MF Yevhenii Makarenko 21 May 1991 (age 28) 4 0 Belgium Anderlecht v.  Turkey, 20 November 2018

FW Júnior Moraes INJ 4 April 1987 (age 32) 2 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk v.  Serbia, 7 June 2019 WD
FW Roman Zozulya 17 November 1989 (age 29) 32 4 Spain Albacete v.  Portugal, 22 March 2019 ALT
FW Andriy Boryachuk 23 April 1996 (age 23) 2 0 Ukraine Mariupol v.  Turkey, 20 November 2018
FW Vladyslav Kulach INJ 7 May 1993 (age 26) 0 0 Ukraine Oleksandriya v.  Slovakia, 16 November 2018 ALT
FW Yevhen Seleznyov 20 July 1985 (age 33) 57 11 Spain Málaga v.  Slovakia, 9 September 2018

Notes:

  • INJ = Now injury.
  • WD = Withdrew.
  • PRE = Preliminary squad.
  • RET = Retired from the national team.
  • SUS Suspended for the next match.
  • U21 = Joined the Ukraine national under-21 team instead.
  • ALT Alternate - replaces a member of the squad in case of injury/unavailability

Previous squads

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup record

FIFA World Cup FIFA World Cup qualification
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1930–1990 Part of  Soviet Union Part of  Soviet Union
United States 1994 Not a FIFA member Not a FIFA member
France 1998 Did not qualify 12 6 3 3 11 9
South Korea Japan 2002 12 4 6 2 15 13
Germany 2006 Quarter-finals 8th 5 2 1 2 5 7 12 7 4 1 18 7
South Africa 2010 Did not qualify 12 6 4 2 21 7
Brazil 2014 12 7 3 2 30 7
Russia 2018 10 5 2 3 13 9
Qatar 2022 To be determined To be determined
Canada Mexico United States 2026
Total Quarter-finals 1/7 5 2 1 2 5 7 70 35 22 13 108 52
* Denotes draws include knock-out matches decided on penalty kicks.

UEFA European Championship record

UEFA European Championship UEFA European Championship qualifying
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1960–1992 Part of  Soviet Union Part of  Soviet Union
England 1996 Did not qualify 10 4 1 5 11 15
Belgium Netherlands 2000 12 5 6 1 16 7
Portugal 2004 8 2 4 2 11 10
Austria Switzerland 2008 12 5 2 5 18 16
Poland Ukraine 2012 Group stage 13th 3 1 0 2 2 4 Qualified as host nation
France 2016 Group stage 24th 3 0 0 3 0 5 12 7 2 3 17 5
European Union 2020 To be determined To be determined
Total Group stage 2/6 6 1 0 5 2 9 54 23 15 16 73 53

Qualifying campaigns

FIFA World Cup UEFA European Championship
1994 – Qualifying spot not granted by FIFA 1996 – 4th in Qualifying group 4
1998 – 2nd in Qualifying group 9, lost to Croatia in play-off 2000 – 2nd in Qualifying group 4, lost to Slovenia in play-off
2002 – 2nd in Qualifying group 5, lost to Germany in play-off 2004 – 3rd in Qualifying group 6
2006 – Qualified for the tournament (1st in Qualifying group 2) 2008 – 4th in Qualifying group B
2010 – 2nd in Qualifying group 6, lost to Greece in play-off 2012 – Qualified for the tournament (as a host nation)
2014 – 2nd in Qualifying group H, lost to France in play-off 2016 – Qualified for the tournament (3rd in Qualifying group C, won over Slovenia in play-off)
2018 – 3rd in Qualifying group I

UEFA Nations League record

UEFA Championship record
Year Division Round Pos Pld W D L GF GA
2018–19 B Group stage
Promoted
1st 4 3 0 1 5 5
2020–21 A To be determined
Total Group stage
League B
1/1 4 3 0 1 5 5

All-time team record

Ukraine national football team (matches with opponents)
World Map of Ukraine's opponents (2014)

The following table shows Ukraine's all-time international record, correct as of 25 March 2019.[38]

Key
Positive balance (more wins)
Neutral balance (equal W/L ratio)
Negative balance (more losses)
Against Confederation Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD
 Albania UEFA 6 5 1 0 13 4 +9
 Andorra UEFA 4 4 0 0 17 0 +17
 Armenia UEFA 8 5 3 0 17 8 +9
 Austria UEFA 2 1 0 1 4 4 0
 Azerbaijan UEFA 2 1 1 0 6 0 +6
 Belarus UEFA 9 5 3 1 12 5 +7
 Brazil CONMEBOL 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2
 Bulgaria UEFA 5 3 2 0 7 2 +5
 Cameroon CAF 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
 Canada CONCACAF 1 0 1 0 2 2 0
 Chile CONMEBOL 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1
 Costa Rica CONCACAF 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4
 Croatia UEFA 9 1 3 5 5 15 −10
 Cyprus UEFA 3 1 1 1 5 5 0
 Czech Republic UEFA 4 2 1 1 3 5 −2
 Denmark UEFA 3 1 1 1 2 2 0
 England UEFA 7 1 2 4 3 9 −6
 Estonia UEFA 4 4 0 0 10 0 +10
 Faroe Islands UEFA 2 2 0 0 7 0 +7
 Finland UEFA 2 2 0 0 3 1 +2
 France UEFA 9 1 3 5 5 14 −9
 Georgia UEFA 9 6 3 0 16 6 +10
 Germany UEFA 6 0 3 3 5 12 −7
 Greece UEFA 6 2 2 2 4 3 +1
 Hungary UEFA 2 0 0 2 2 5 −3
 Iceland UEFA 4 1 2 1 3 4 −1
 Iran AFC 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1
 Israel UEFA 6 2 2 2 7 5 +2
 Italy UEFA 8 0 2 6 3 15 −12
 Japan AFC 3 2 0 1 3 2 +1
 Kazakhstan UEFA 4 4 0 0 9 3 +6
 Kosovo UEFA 2 2 0 0 5 0 +5
 Latvia UEFA 3 2 1 0 3 1 +2
 Lithuania UEFA 8 5 1 2 15 8 +7
 Libya CAF 2 1 1 0 4 1 +3
 Luxembourg UEFA 4 4 0 0 11 1 +10
 North Macedonia UEFA 4 2 1 1 3 1 +2
 Mexico CONCACAF 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1
 Moldova UEFA 5 3 2 0 6 3 +3
 Montenegro UEFA 2 1 0 1 4 1 +3
 Morocco CAF 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
 Netherlands UEFA 2 0 1 1 1 4 −3
 Niger CAF 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1
 Northern Ireland UEFA 5 2 2 1 3 3 0
 Norway UEFA 5 4 1 0 5 0 +5
 Poland UEFA 8 3 2 3 9 9 0
 Portugal UEFA 3 1 1 1 2 2 0
 Romania UEFA 6 2 1 3 10 14 −4
 Russia UEFA 2 1 1 0 4 3 +1
 San Marino UEFA 2 2 0 0 17 0 +17
 Saudi Arabia AFC 2 1 1 0 5 1 +4
 South Korea AFC 2 0 0 2 0 3 −3
 Scotland UEFA 2 1 0 1 3 3 0
 Serbia UEFA 5 5 0 0 9 1 +8
 Slovakia UEFA 8 3 3 2 9 10 –1
 Slovenia UEFA 6 1 3 2 7 7 0
 Spain UEFA 5 0 1 4 3 10 −7
  Switzerland UEFA 2 1 1 0 2 2 0
 Sweden UEFA 4 2 1 1 4 3 +1
 Tunisia CAF 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1
 Turkey UEFA 9 2 3 4 9 11 −2
 United Arab Emirates AFC 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
 United States CONCACAF 4 3 1 0 5 1 +4
 Uruguay CONMEBOL 1 0 0 1 2 3 −1
 Uzbekistan AFC 2 2 0 0 4 1 +3
 Wales UEFA 4 2 2 0 3 1 +2
Total 5/6 243 116 64 63 340 229 +111

Home venues record

Since Ukraine's first fixture (29 April 1992 vs. Hungary) they have played their home games at 11 different stadiums.

Venue City Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Points per game
Olimpiyskiy National Sports Complex Kyiv 57 27 19 11 82 47 1.75
Valeriy Lobanovskyi Dynamo Stadium Kyiv 20 13 5 2 38 15 2.2
Arena Lviv Lviv 10 8 2 0 24 4 2.6
Metalist Oblast Sports Complex Kharkiv 10 5 1 4 14 8 1.6
Ukraina Stadium Lviv 6 6 0 0 14 5 3
Chornomorets Stadium Odesa 5 4 1 0 6 2 2.6
Donbass Arena Donetsk 5 0 1 4 2 9 0.2
Dnipro-Arena Dnipro 2 2 0 0 2 0 3
Shakhtar Stadium Donetsk 2 0 1 1 0 2 0.5
Meteor Stadium Dnipro 1 0 1 0 2 2 1
Avanhard Stadium Uzhhorod 1 0 0 1 1 3 0
Totals 119 65 31 23 185 97 1.9
Last updated: 16 October 2018. Statistics include official FIFA-recognised matches only.

FIFA Ranking history

[39]

1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
90 77 71 59 49 47 27 34 45 45 60 57 40 13 30 15 22 34 55 47 18 25 29 30 35

Kits and sponsors

Kit history and evolution

On 29 March 2010, Ukraine debuted a new Adidas kit.[40] This replaced the Adidas kit with a yellow base and the traditional Adidas three stripe with a snake sash which was used in 2009.[41] Prior to 5 February 2009 Ukraine wore a Lotto kit. On 2009 the official team kit is produced by German company Adidas which has a contract with the Ukrainian team until 31 December 2016. Joma manufactured the kits starting from the year 2017 for the match against Croatia on March 24, 2017.[42]

Logo of Football Federation of Ukraine
Former crest.

Sponsors

Marketing for the Football Federation of Ukraine is conducted by the Ukraine Football International (UFI).

Former title and general sponsors included Ukrtelecom and Kyivstar.[46]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Here not included players, who capped in the match against Malta national football team on 6 June 2017, where were used a 10 substitutions (Low 03: 2. Number of substitutions: "In national “A” team matches, up to a maximum of six substitutes may be used"). For these reasons the match isn't recognised by FIFA.[19]

References

  1. ^ источники, Внешние. "Шевченко - главный тренер сборной Украины".
  2. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 4 April 2019. Retrieved 4 April 2019.
  3. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 27 March 2019. Retrieved 27 March 2019.
  4. ^ a b c uefa.com. "Member associations - Ukraine - Profile – UEFA.com". UEFA.com.
  5. ^ NSK Olimpiysky, Ukrainian Soccer Portal
  6. ^ The Ukrainian Football National Team of 1925–1935 (in Ukrainian)
  7. ^ Ukrainian Soccer History website (in Ukrainian)
  8. ^ New York Times, 8 December 1991, Nations Lining Up for the Big Drawing
  9. ^ "RSSSF European Championship 1988 – Final Tournament – Full Details". Rsssf.com. Retrieved 7 December 2011.
  10. ^ Cite error: The named reference no1994 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  11. ^ 1992 season of the Russian national football tean. Rusteam.permian.ru
  12. ^ In captivity of emotions and ambitions (В плену у эмоций и амбиций). Fanat (from Komanda newspaper).
  13. ^ From Korea - empty-handed ("supping unsalted") (Из Кореи - не солоно хлебавши). Komanda newspaper (by Fanat)
  14. ^ Slovenians surprised and got surprised (Словенцы удивили и удивились). Komanda newspaper (by Fanat).
  15. ^ Premature compliments (Преждевременные комплименты). Komanda newspaper (by Fanat)
  16. ^ Hopes are new, yet result is erstwhile (Надежды новые, результат прежний). Komanda newspaper (by Fanat)
  17. ^ "Slováci budú hrať v Lige národov na Ukrajine bez divákov, pre trest z roku 2015" [Slovaks will play in Nations League in Ukraine without spectators due to 2015 punishment]. SME (in Slovak). Petit Press. 1 February 2018. Retrieved 2 February 2018.
  18. ^ The Ukraine v Slovakia match will be played behind closed doors due to a UEFA punishment against Ukraine for racist behaviour in their UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying home match against Spain.[17]
  19. ^ "Laws of the Game 2018/19" (PDF). Official FIFA Website. Retrieved 9 September 2018.
  20. ^ Вербицький, Іван. "Шевчук – 25-й у історії збірної України капітан".
  21. ^ http://zbirna.com/2018/01/04/v-chem-andrej-shevchenko-uzhe-prevzoshel-valeriya-lobanovskogo/
  22. ^ "Copy of the document for the resgnation". Retrieved 7 December 2011.
  23. ^ "Збірну довірили Калитвинцеву (National team was entrusted to Kalitvintsev)". www.ffu.org.ua (in Ukrainian). 25 August 2010.
  24. ^ Ukraine appoint Blokhin, Sky Sports (21 April 2011)
  25. ^ Friendlies
  26. ^ Андрій Баль призначений в.о. головного тренера збірної України (Andriy Bal is appointed acting head coach of the Ukrainian national team), www.ua-football.com (6 October 2012)
  27. ^ Ukraine's football federation taps Fomenko to coach national team, Kyiv Post (26 December 2012)
  28. ^ https://ffu.ua/article/36571
  29. ^ Strack-Zimmermann, Benjamin. "Ukraine (2019)". www.national-football-teams.com.
  30. ^ "Ukraine - Record International Players". www.rsssf.com.
  31. ^ "Football Federation of Ukraine's official website". ffu.org.ua.
  32. ^ "Football Federation of Ukraine's official website". ffu.org.ua.
  33. ^ "Football Federation of Ukraine's official website". ffu.org.ua.
  34. ^ http://ffu.org.ua/eng/teams/teams_main/16928/
  35. ^ https://en.ffu.ua/article/1965
  36. ^ https://ffu.ua/article/34473
  37. ^ https://ffu.ua/article/35158
  38. ^ "All matches". ffu.org.ua. Retrieved 8 October 2010.
  39. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking - Associations - Ukraine - Men's". FIFA.com. 14 September 2017.
  40. ^ "Новую форму сборной первым примерил Ракицкий (+фото) (New uniform for the National team was first fitted by Rakytsky with photo)". ua.football (in Russian). Globalinfo (Kyiv, Ukraine). 29 March 2010.
  41. ^ "Ukraine 09/10 Adidas football kits". footballshirtculture. 6 February 2009. Retrieved 11 June 2009.
  42. ^ https://www.joma-sport.com/en/news/joma-official-technical-sponsor-of-football-federation-of-ukraine
  43. ^ "Спонсор збірної України пообіцяв $2 млн. за вихід на ЧС-2014 - Факти". 22 January 2013.
  44. ^ "Article-news at epicentrk.com.ua".
  45. ^ Presentation of new sponsors in 2013 on YouTube. Youtube channel of FFU.
  46. ^ источники, Внешние. "Спонсори збірної України, їх статуси і класифікація".

External links

Anatoliy Konkov

Anatoliy Konkov (Ukrainian: Анатолій Дмитрович Коньков; born 19 September 1949) is a former Ukrainian football player and recognized as the Merited Master of Sports of the USSR (1982). He was elected as the President of the Football Federation of Ukraine in September 2012.

Andriy Bal

Andriy Mykhailovych Bal (Ukrainian: Андрій Михайлович Баль, Russian: Андрей Михайлович Баль, Andrey Mikhaylovich Bal; 16 February 1958 – 9 August 2014) was a Ukrainian football midfielder and coach.

Anton Idzkovsky

Anton Leonardovych Idzkovsky (Ukrainian: Антон Леонардович Ідзковський) was a Soviet football player, goalkeeper, and later an administrator for the Football Federation of the Ukrainian SSR. He is honored as the Distinguished Master of Sports (1945) and the Distinguished Coach of Ukraine (1961).

Leonid Buryak

Leonid Yosipovich Buryak (Ukrainian: Леонід Йосипович Буряк; born 10 July 1953) is a Ukrainian football coach, and a former Olympic bronze-medal-winning player.

Leonid Tkachenko (footballer)

Leonid Ivanovich Tkachenko (Russian: Леонид Иванович Ткаченко; born October 1, 1953 in Staryi Krym, Crimea) is a former Soviet player and the Ukrainian-Russian coach.

Together with Mykola Pavlov served as an interim coach for Ukrainian national football team when it traveled to Belarus for a friendly against the Belarusian national football team. Him and Pavlov were assistant coaches to Viktor Prokopenko before that. Sometime in 2000 he relocated to the Russian Federation and obtained the Russian citizenship.

Meteor Stadium

Meteor Stadium is a multi-purpose stadium in Dnipro, Ukraine. It is part of the Sports Complex Meteor and is a home of the Olympic and Paralympic teams of Ukraine with status national.

Mykola Pavlov

Mykola Petrovych Pavlov (Ukrainian: Микола Петрович Павлов) (Russian: Николай Петрович Павлов; born 20 June 1954 in Kiev, in the Ukrainian SSR of the Soviet Union) is a former Ukrainian football defender, and former head-coach of Illychivets Mariupol in the Ukrainian Premier League. He is Merited Master of Sports of the USSR (1983) and Merited Coach of Ukraine.

Myron Markevych

Myron Bohdanovych Markevych (Ukrainian: Миро́н Богда́нович Марке́вич; born February 1, 1951) is a Ukrainian football manager and a former midfielder.

He worked as a manager in the Ukrainian Premier League and the Ukrainian national football team. He holds the record for coaching the most matches (500 as on August 15, 2011) in the Ukrainian Premier League.

Oleg Oshenkov

Oleg Aleksandrovich Oshenkov (Russian: Ошенков, Олег Александрович; 27 May 1911 – 1 January 1976) was a Soviet association football player and coach. Merited Master of Sports of USSR (1953)Born in the Russian capital, Saint Petersburg, Oshenkov spent all of his playing career in the city, while most of it playing for Dynamo Leningrad. As coach and manager, he worked with several clubs, including Dynamo Kyiv and Shakhtar.In 1956 along with Anton Idzkovsky, Oshenkov was a head coach of the Ukraine national football team at the Summer Spartakiad of the Peoples of the USSR.From 1971 through 1975 he chaired the Football Federation of Ukrainian SSR.

Oleh Bazylevych

Oleh Petrovych Bazylevych (Ukrainian: Оле́г Петро́вич Базиле́вич; 6 July 1938 – 16 October 2018) was a Ukrainian footballer, football (soccer) coach, and sport administrator. He holds titles of the Master of Sports of the USSR, Merited Coach of the Soviet Union, and Merited Coach of Ukraine.

Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko

Oleksiy Oleksandrovych Mykhaylychenko (Ukrainian: Олексій Олександрович Михайличенко; born March 30, 1963) is a Ukrainian football coach and former professional football player. He is the Distinguished Master of Sports of USSR and the Distinguished Coach of Ukraine. During his playing days he was a versatile midfielder known for his stamina and passing capability. Also noted for his technique, Mykhaylychenko usually played as central attacking midfielder.

Mykhailychenko currently holds an administrative position in his home club, Dynamo Kyiv, as director of sport. His name is commonly romanised as Alexei Mikhailichenko from the Russian spelling of his name (Алексей Александрович Михайличенко).

Mikhailichenko played for Dynamo Kyiv, Sampdoria and Rangers. He then became a coach, starting with assistant coach to Dynamo Kyiv's legendary Valeriy Lobanovsky. Following the death of Lobanovsky, Mykhailychenko replaced him as head coach. In 2004, he took charge of the Ukraine's national under-21 team. He was head coach of the Ukraine national football team senior side for two years after that.

Ukraine national football team 1992

Ukraine national football team 1992 was the very first composed team that represented the now independent Ukraine. Note that it was not the very first to represent Ukraine, though. The country while being part of the Soviet Union used to play several games mostly against the Turkish nationals back 1930s. Those games, however, later were scratched and went into the oblivion.

Ukraine national football team 1993

The Ukrainian Football Federation had failed to secure recognition in time to compete in the 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification (it achieved this by late 1994). Thus the Ukrainian national football team of 1993 only played friendly matches. A total of 33 players were selected from 11 clubs of the Premier League, of which 11 were from Dynamo Kyiv, 6 from Dnipro and 5 from Chornomorets.

Ukraine national football team 2010

This is a list of the Ukraine national football team results from 2010.

Valeriy Lobanovskyi

Valeriy Vasylyovych Lobanovskyi (Ukrainian: Вале́рій Васи́льович Лобано́вський, [vɑˈlɛrɪj lobɑˈnɔwsʲkɪj]; Russian: Вале́рий Васи́льевич Лобано́вский; 6 January 1939 – 13 May 2002) was Ukrainian football manager. He was the Master of Sports of USSR, the Distinguished Coach of USSR, and the laureate of the UEFA Ruby Order (2002) and FIFA Order of Merit, the highest honour awarded by FIFA.Lobanovskyi is most famous for his spells managing FC Dynamo Kyiv, the Ukraine national football team, and earlier the USSR national football team. In 1975 his Dynamo Kyiv team became the first side from the Soviet Union to win a major European trophy when they beat Hungarian side Ferencváros in the final of the Cup Winners' Cup. Lobanovskyi is highly esteemed for his achievements as a coach and is widely regarded as one of the greatest of all time, but was also notorious for his both highly scientific and excessively disciplinarian approach to management and strong emphasis on physical fitness and diet. Lobanovskyi is the second most decorated manager of all time with 33 trophies, only behind Alex Ferguson (48 trophies).

Viktor Kolotov

Viktor Mikhailovich Kolotov (Russian: Виктор Михайлович Колотов) (born 3 July 1949, Yudino, Tatar ASSR – 3 January 2000, Kiev) was a Soviet and Ukrainian footballer.

He was born in the settlement of Yudino, Kazan municipality. Today the settlement is included in the Kirov Raion of Kazan city. After becoming a coach he extended his welcomed stay in Kiev. Together with Dynamo Kyiv he became the four-time champion of the USSR as well as the two-time holder of the USSR Cup. Also in Europe he participated in the memorable 1976–1975 season when Dynamo Kyiv conquered the Cup Winner's Cup and the UEFA Super Cup. Kolotov was also a European vice-champion (1972).

In 1979 Kolotov played couple of games for Ukraine at the Spartakiad of the Peoples of the USSR.

Viktor Prokopenko

Viktor Prokopenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Прокопенко) (24 October 1944 – 18 August 2007) was a football (soccer) player and coach who played in GDR and Ukrainian SSR and later worked as a coach in Russia and Ukraine.

Yozhef Sabo

Yozhef Yozhefovich Sabo (Ukrainian: Йожеф Йожефович Сабо; Hungarian: Szabó József; born 29 February 1940) is a former Soviet football player, Soviet and Ukrainian football manager. He is of Hungarian background. He is baptized as a Greek-Catholic.

31 May 2018 FriendlyMorocco 0–0 UkraineGeneva, Switzerland
20:00 (UTC+2) Report (FFU)
Report (FRMF)
Stadium: Stade de Genève
Attendance: 8,000
Referee: Sandro Schärer (Switzerland)
3 June 2018 FriendlyAlbania 1–4 UkraineÉvian-les-Bains, France
16:00 (UTC+2) Ndoj Goal 89' Report (FFU)
Report (FSHF)
Konoplyanka Goal 31'90'
Yarmolenko Goal 35'45+1'
Stadium: Camille Fournier Stadium
Attendance: 600
Referee: Francois Letexier (France)
6 September 2018 2018–19 UEFA Nations League BCzech Republic 1–2 UkraineUherské Hradiště, Czech Republic
20:45
(20:45 UTC+2)
Schick Goal 4' Report (FFU)
Report (FAČR)
Konoplyanka Goal 45+1'
Zinchenko Goal 90+3'
Stadium: Městský fotbalový stadion Miroslava Valenty
Attendance: 7,974
Referee: Anthony Taylor (England)
9 September 2018 2018–19 UEFA Nations League BUkraine 1–0 SlovakiaLviv, Ukraine
15:00
(16:00 UTC+3)
Yarmolenko Goal 80' (pen.) Report (FFU)
Report (SFZ)
Stadium: Arena Lviv
Attendance: 0[18]
Referee: Anastasios Sidiropoulos (Greece)
10 October 2018 FriendlyItaly 1–1 UkraineGenoa, Italy
20:45
(21:45 UTC+3)
Bernardeschi Goal 55' Report (FFU)
Report (FIGC)
Malinovskyi Goal 62' Stadium: Stadio Luigi Ferraris
Attendance: 12,000
Referee: Rade Obrenović (Slovenia)
16 October 2018 2018–19 UEFA Nations League BUkraine 1–0 Czech RepublicKharkiv, Ukraine
20:45
(21:45 UTC+3)
Malinovskyi Goal 43' Report (FFU)
Report (FAČR)
Stadium: Metalist Stadium
Attendance: 32,000
Referee: Gediminas Mažeika (Lithuania)
16 November 2018 2018–19 UEFA Nations League BSlovakia 4–1 UkraineTrnava, Slovakia
20:45
(21:45 UTC+3)
Rusnák Goal 6'
Kucka Goal 26'
Zreľák Goal 52'
Mak Goal 61'
Report (FFU)
Report (SFZ)
Konoplyanka Goal 47' Stadium: Štadión Antona Malatinského
Attendance: 9,764
Referee: Nikola Dabanović (Montenegro)
20 November 2018 FriendlyTurkey 0–0 UkraineAntalya, Turkey
19:30
(19:30UTC+2)
Report (FFU)
Report (TFF)
Stadium: Antalya Arena
Attendance: 14,000
Referee: Genc Nuza (Kosovo)
22 March 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Group BPortugal 0–0 UkraineLisbon, Portugal
20:45
(21:45 UTC+3)
Report (FFU)
Report (FPF)
Stadium: Estádio da Luz
Attendance: 58,355
Referee: Clément Turpin (France)
25 March 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Group BLuxembourg 1–2 UkraineLuxembourg City, Luxembourg
20:45
(21:45 UTC+3)
Turpel Goal 34' Report (FFU)
Report (FLF)
Tsyhankov Goal 40'
Rodrigues Goal 90+3' (o.g.)
Stadium: Stade Josy Barthel
Attendance: 4,653
Referee: Mattias Gestranius (Finland)
7 June 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Group BUkraine  SerbiaLviv, Ukraine
20:45
(21:45 UTC+3)
[Report (FFU)]
[Report (FSS)]
Stadium: Arena Lviv
10 June 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Group BUkraine  LuxembourgLviv, Ukraine
20:45
(21:45 UTC+3)
[Report (FFU)]
[Report (FLF)]
Stadium: Arena Lviv
7 September 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Group BLithuania  UkraineLithuania
18:00
(19:00 UTC+3)
[Report (FFU)]
[Report (LFF)]
10 September 2019 FriendlyUkraine TBATBA
TBA
11 October 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Group BUkraine  LithuaniaKharkiv, Ukraine
20:45
(21:45 UTC+3)
[Report (FFU)]
[Report (LFF)]
Stadium: Metalist Stadium
14 October 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Group BUkraine  PortugalKiev, Ukraine
20:45
(21:45 UTC+3)
[Report (FFU)]
[Report (FPF)]
14 November 2019 FriendlyUkraine  EstoniaUkraine
TBA
17 November 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Group BSerbia  UkraineSerbia
15:00
(16:00 UTC+3)
[Report (FFU)]
[Report (FSS)]
Ukraine national football team
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