USS Wayne E. Meyer

USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG-108) is an Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer in the United States Navy. She is named after Rear Admiral Wayne E. Meyer, known as the "Father of Aegis". She carries the 100th AEGIS Weapon System to be delivered to the United States Navy.[2] Wayne E. Meyer is the 58th destroyer in her class. She was built by Bath Iron Works, and was christened by sponsor Anna Mae Meyer, wife of Admiral Meyer, and launched on 18 October 2008. She completed sea trials in June 2009 and was delivered to the Navy in July 2009.[1] She was commissioned on the Delaware River in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 10 October 2009.

USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG-108)
US Navy 120214-N-OY799-496 The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108), transits the Pacific Ocean during a photo
USS Wayne E. Meyer at sea in 2012
History
United States
Name: USS Wayne E. Meyer
Namesake: Rear Admiral Wayne E. Meyer
Awarded: 9 September 2002
Builder: Bath Iron Works
Laid down: 18 May 2007
Launched: 19 October 2008
Sponsored by: Anna Mae Meyer
Acquired: 10 July 2009[1]
Commissioned: 10 October 2009
Homeport: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
Motto: "One Powerful Legacy"
Status: in active service
Badge: USS Wayne E. Meyer COA
General characteristics
Class and type: Arleigh Burke-class destroyer
Displacement: 9,200 tons
Length: 509 ft 6 in (155.30 m)
Beam: 66 ft (20 m)
Draft: 31 ft (9.4 m)
Propulsion: 4 × General Electric LM2500-30 gas turbines, 2 shafts, 100,000 shp (75 MW)
Speed: exceeds 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph)
Complement: 275 officers and enlisted
Armament:
Aircraft carried: 2 × SH-60 Sea Hawk helicopters

Ship history

Wayne E. Meyer arrived at her homeport in San Diego, California on 4 December 2009.[3]

Wayne E. Meyer made her maiden deployment as part of the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group (CSG) from 29 July 2011 until 27 February 2012. She made port calls in Malaysia, Japan, South Korea, Thailand, Bahrain, Dubai, and the Philippines.

In January 2017, Wayne E. Meyer and USS Michael Murphy (DDG-112) were part of Destroyer Squadron 1, and along with USS Lake Champlain (CG-57) and USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) formed Carrier Strike Group One (CSG-1), during a deployment to the western Pacific. In April of that year, CSG-1 cancelled a scheduled port call in Australia, in response to increasing tensions between the United States and North Korea over the latter's nuclear weapons program.[4][5]

In September 2018 Wayne E. Meyer and USS O'Kane (DDG-77) completed homeport swaps. Wayne E. Meyer arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam on September 13 and O'Kane got underway for her new homeport of San Diego.

In popular culture

  • Wayne E. Meyer was featured in the episode "Destroyer Disaster" of the Food Network show, Dinner: Impossible.[6]

Gallery

DDG108 Christening Party 1

Christening party for Wayne E. Meyer, at Bath Iron Works 18 October 2008

DDG-108 Stern View

Stern view of Wayne E. Meyer prior to launching 18 October 2008

References

  1. ^ a b "Navy Accepts Delivery of Future USS Wayne E. Meyer". Navy News Service. 10 July 2009. Retrieved 11 July 2009.
  2. ^ "Destroyer to be named for weapons developer". Courier-Post. 10 October 2009.
  3. ^ "FAQ". USS Wayne E. Meyer.
  4. ^ "Commander, Destroyer Squadron 1". U.S. Navy. Retrieved 12 April 2017.
  5. ^ "Commander, Carrier Strike Group 1". U.S. Navy. Archived from the original on 13 April 2017. Retrieved 12 April 2017.
  6. ^ "Destroyer Disaster Episode IE0801". Food Network. Archived from the original on 10 November 2013. Retrieved 22 March 2015.

External links

2011–12 Strait of Hormuz dispute

The Strait of Hormuz dispute is an ongoing dispute between a coalition of countries and Iran. The dispute arose on 27 December 2011, when Iranian Vice President Mohammad-Reza Rahimi threatened to close the Strait of Hormuz. In late April 2019 Iran said that it will block any shipping if it was barred from using the strategic waterway and in face of US sanctionsSubsequently, a number of naval drills and missile tests were carried out by Iran. A coalition of countries responded by sending a flotilla of warships to deter any Iranian attempt to close the Strait of Hormuz and warned Iran publicly and through letters not to close the Strait.

The dispute was interjected by a European Union sanction banning oil exports from Iran to Europe on 23 January 2012 in an attempt to deter Iran from continuing with their nuclear program. Oil exports contribute to about 80% of Iranian public revenue, with roughly 20% being exported to Europe. Asian countries such as Japan and South Korea, which both account for 26% of Iran's oil exports have expressed a willingness to reduce oil exports from Iran.

Bath Iron Works

Bath Iron Works (BIW) is a major United States shipyard located on the Kennebec River in Bath, Maine, founded in 1884 as Bath Iron Works, Limited. BIW has built private, commercial, and military vessels, most of which have been ordered by the United States Navy. The shipyard has built and sometimes designed battleships, frigates, cruisers, and destroyers, including the Arleigh Burke class which are currently among the world's most advanced surface warships.

Since 1995, Bath Iron Works has been a subsidiary of General Dynamics, the fifth-largest defense contractor in the world as of 2008. During World War II, ships built at BIW were considered to be of superior toughness by sailors and Navy officials, giving rise to the phrase "Bath-built is best-built."

Carrier Strike Group 1

Carrier Strike Group One (CSG-1 or CARSTRKGRU 1) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) is the strike group's current flagship, and other units currently assigned are the ship's Carrier Air Wing 2 and embarked Destroyer Squadron 1, deployed with Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Champlain, as well as Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Michael Murphy and USS Wayne E. Meyer.

Although the previous Carrier Strike Group One traced its history to Carrier Division 1, formed in 1930, the current Carrier Strike Group One was an entirely new naval formation when it was established in October 2009. During the relocation of its flagship Carl Vinson to its new home base in San Diego, California, it supported Operation Unified Response, providing humanitarian assistance following the 2010 Haiti earthquake. During its first overseas deployment in 2011, the body of Osama bin Laden was flown to the Carl Vinson for burial at sea. Carrier Strike Group One was the second U.S. Navy carrier force to participate in Operation Inherent Resolve.

Carrier Strike Group 3

Carrier Strike Group 3 (CSG-3 or CARSTRKGRU 3) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. Carrier strike groups gain and maintain sea control as well as project naval airpower ashore. The aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) is the group's current flagship. Other units assigned include Carrier Air Wing Nine; the Ticonderoga-class cruisers USS Mobile Bay (CG-53) and USS Antietam (CG-54); and the ships of Destroyer Squadron 21.Between 2005 and 2013, the group made five deployments to the U.S. Fifth Fleet supporting U.S. ground forces in Iraq, and Afghanistan. On 18 December 2011, strike group aircraft flew the final carrier-based air mission over Iraq, effectively ending U.S. naval support for Operation New Dawn.

Carrier Strike Group 9

Carrier Strike Group 9 (CSG-9 or CARSTRKGRU 9) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. Carrier strike groups gain and maintain sea control as well as project naval airpower ashore.It is currently assigned to the U.S. Pacific Fleet. The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) is the group's current flagship. Other group units include Carrier Air Wing Seventeen, the Ticonderoga-class cruisers USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and USS Cape St. George (CG-71), and Destroyer Squadron 23.The strike group traces its history to Cruiser-Destroyer Group 3, created on 30 June 1973 by the re-designation of Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla 11. From 2004 the strike group has made multiple Middle East deployments providing air forces over Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as conducting Maritime Security Operations. The strike group received the Humanitarian Service Medal in recognition of its disaster relief efforts in Indonesia during Operation Unified Assistance in 2004–05.

Guided missile destroyer

A guided-missile destroyer is a destroyer designed to launch guided missiles. Many are also equipped to carry out anti-submarine, anti-air, and anti-surface operations. The NATO standard designation for these vessels is DDG. Nations vary in their use of destroyer D designation in their hull pennant numbering, either prefixing or dropping it altogether. The U.S. Navy has adopted the classification DDG in the American hull classification system.

In addition to the guns, a guided-missile destroyer is usually equipped with two large missile magazines, usually in vertical-launch cells. Some guided-missile destroyers contain powerful radar systems, such as the United States’ Aegis Combat System, and may be adopted for use in an anti-missile or ballistic-missile defense role. This is especially true of navies that no longer operate cruisers, so other vessels must be adopted to fill in the gap.

List of U.S. military vessels named after living Americans

The naming of United States Navy vessels after living people was common in early decades of American history, but by World War II, the Navy had firmly established a practice of naming ships for people only after they had died. In 1969, a Navy panel decreed that warships would no longer be named after living persons. That lasted until 1974, when President Richard Nixon announced the naming of an aircraft carrier after United States Representative Carl Vinson. Since then, ships such as the Arleigh Burke, Henry M. Jackson, Bob Hope, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, and Gabrielle Giffords have been named for people still alive at the time.

The U.S. Navy generally announces the name of a ship some time before it is launched, and well before it is accepted for purchase and commissioned into active service.

List of University of Kansas people

The list of University of Kansas people includes notable alumni and faculty of the University of Kansas, whose main campus is located in the American city of Lawrence, Kansas.

List of current ships of the United States Navy

The United States Navy has approximately 490 ships in both active service and the reserve fleet, with approximately 90 more in either the planning and ordering stages or under construction, according to the Naval Vessel Register and published reports. This list includes ships that are owned and leased by the U.S. Navy; ships that are formally commissioned, by way of ceremony, and non-commissioned. Ships denoted with the prefix "USS" are commissioned ships. Prior to commissioning, ships may be described as a "pre-commissioning unit" or PCU, but are officially referred to by name with no prefix. US Navy support ships are often non-commissioned ships organized and operated by Military Sealift Command. Among these support ships, those denoted "USNS" are owned by the US Navy. Those denoted by "MV" or "SS" are chartered.

Current ships include commissioned warships that are in active service, as well as ships that are part of Military Sealift Command, the support component and the Ready Reserve Force, that while non-commissioned, are still part of the effective force of the U.S. Navy. Future ships listed are those that are in the planning stages, or are currently under construction, from having its keel laid to fitting out and final sea trials.

There exist a number of former US Navy ships which are museum ships (not listed here), some of which may be US government-owned. One of these, USS Constitution, a three-masted tall ship, is one of the original six frigates of the United States Navy. It is the oldest naval vessel afloat, and still retains its commission (and hence is listed here), as a special commemoration for that ship alone.

List of equipment of the United States Navy

The Equipment of the United States Navy have been subdivided into: watercraft, aircraft, munitions, vehicles, and small arms.

Naval Station Pearl Harbor

Naval Station Pearl Harbor is a U.S. naval base adjacent to Honolulu, in the U.S. state of Hawaii. In 2010, along with the United States Air Force's Hickam Air Force Base, the facility was merged to form Joint Base Pearl Harbor–Hickam.

Pearl Harbor is the headquarters of the United States Pacific Fleet. The attack on Pearl Harbor by the Empire of Japan on Sunday 7 December 1941 brought the United States into World War II.

USS Carl Vinson

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) is the United States Navy's third Nimitz-class supercarrier. It is named for Carl Vinson, a Congressman from Georgia, in recognition of his contributions to the U.S. Navy. The ship was launched in 1980, undertook her maiden voyage in 1983, and underwent refueling and overhaul between 2005 and 2009. Carl Vinson's call sign is "Gold Eagle".

Besides deployments in Operation Desert Strike, Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Southern Watch, and Operation Enduring Freedom, Carl Vinson was involved in a number of notable events. The body of Osama bin Laden was buried at sea in 2011 from the deck of Carl Vinson, and that same year, on Veterans Day, she played host to the first NCAA basketball game on an aircraft carrier, between North Carolina and Michigan State.

USS John C. Stennis

USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) is the seventh Nimitz-class nuclear-powered supercarrier in the United States Navy, named for Senator John C. Stennis of Mississippi. She was commissioned on 9 December 1995. Her home port is temporarily Norfolk, Virginia, for her scheduled refueling complex and overhaul. After her overhaul she is scheduled to return to Bremerton, Washington.

USS Meyer

USS Meyer may refer to more than one United States Navy ship:

USS Meyer (DD-279), a destroyer in commission from 1919 to 1929

USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG-108), a guided-missile destroyer in commission since 2009See also

USS Myers (APD-105)

USS Michael Murphy

USS Michael Murphy (DDG-112) is the 62nd ship of the Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. She is named for Medal of Honor recipient Michael P. Murphy (1976–2005). Her contract was awarded on 13 September 2002 to the Bath Iron Works and Vice Admiral John Morgan, the first commanding officer of Arleigh Burke, made the first cut of steel. DDG-112 was named Michael Murphy by Secretary of the Navy, Donald C. Winter on 7 May 2008 and her keel was laid down on 18 June 2010. The ship was christened on 7 May 2011, Murphy's birthday, by her sponsor Maureen Murphy, Michael Murphy's mother.

USS Wayne

There have been three United States Navy ships with variations of the name USS Wayne:

USS Fort Wayne (SP-3786), a cargo ship that saw service during World War I

USS Wayne (APA-54), an attack transport ship that saw service during World War II

USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG-108), is an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer. Her keel was laid on 18 May 2007, christened 19 October 2008, and commissioned 10 October 2009

Wayne E. Meyer

Rear Admiral Wayne E. Meyer (April 21, 1926 – September 1, 2009) is regarded as the "Father of Aegis" for his 13 years of service as the Aegis Weapon System Manager and later the founding project manager of the Aegis Shipbuilding Project Office. He retired from the United States Navy in 1985 as the Deputy Commander for Weapons and Combat Systems, Naval Sea Systems, Naval Sea Systems Command and Ordnance Officer of the Navy.

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