USS Ted Stevens (DDG-128)

USS Ted Stevens (DDG-128) is a planned Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer of the United States Navy, the 78th overall for the class.[1] She will be named in honor of Ted Stevens, a U.S. Senator from Alaska who served the Senate for over 40 years and was a staunch supporter of both the Navy and the Marine Corps. Ted Stevens will be the third ship of the Flight III series.[2]

USS Ted Stevens (DDG-128) artist depiction
Graphical depiction of USS Ted Stevens (DDG-128)
History
United States
Name: USS Ted Stevens
Namesake: Ted Stevens
Awarded: 27 September 2018[1]
Builder: Huntington Ingalls Industries
Status: Under construction
General characteristics
Class and type: Arleigh Burke-class destroyer
Displacement: 9,200 long tons (9,300 t)
Length: 510 ft (160 m)
Draft: 33 ft (10 m)
Propulsion: 4 × General Electric LM2500-30 gas turbines, 2 shafts, 100,000 shp (75 MW)
Complement: 380 officers and enlisted
Armament:
Aircraft carried: 2 × SH-60 Sea Hawk helicopters
Aviation facilities: Flight deck, Hangar bay

References

  1. ^ a b "Ted Stevens (DDG 128)". Naval Vessel Register. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  2. ^ "New Navy destroyer named to honor former Sen. Ted Stevens". UPI. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
Guided missile destroyer

A guided-missile destroyer is a destroyer designed to launch guided missiles. Many are also equipped to carry out anti-submarine, anti-air, and anti-surface operations. The NATO standard designation for these vessels is DDG. Nations vary in their use of destroyer D designation in their hull pennant numbering, either prefixing or dropping it altogether. The U.S. Navy has adopted the classification DDG in the American hull classification system.

In addition to the guns, a guided-missile destroyer is usually equipped with two large missile magazines, usually in vertical-launch cells. Some guided-missile destroyers contain powerful radar systems, such as the United States’ Aegis Combat System, and may be adopted for use in an anti-missile or ballistic-missile defense role. This is especially true of navies that no longer operate cruisers, so other vessels must be adopted to fill in the gap.

Ted Stevens

Theodore Fulton Stevens Sr. (November 18, 1923 – August 9, 2010) was an American politician who served as a United States Senator from Alaska from 1968 to 2009. He was the longest-serving Republican U.S. Senator in history at the time he left office; his record was surpassed in January 2017 by Orrin Hatch from Utah. He was President pro tempore of the United States Senate in the 108th and 109th Congresses from January 3, 2003 to January 3, 2007 and was the third U.S. Senator to hold the title of President pro tempore emeritus.

Stevens served for six decades in the American public sector, beginning with his service in World War II. In 1952, his law career took him to Fairbanks, Alaska, where he was appointed U.S. Attorney the following year. In 1956, he returned to Washington D.C. to work in the Eisenhower Interior Department, where he played an important role in bringing about statehood for Alaska. He was elected to the Alaska House of Representatives in 1964 and became House majority leader in his second term. In 1968, Stevens ran unsuccessfully for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate, but was appointed to Alaska's other Senate seat when it became vacant later that year. As a Senator, Stevens played key roles in legislation that shaped Alaska's economic and social development, including the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, the Trans-Alaska Pipeline Authorization Act, the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, and the Magnuson–Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. He was also known for his sponsorship of the Amateur Sports Act of 1978, which resulted in the establishment of the United States Olympic Committee.

In 2008, Stevens was embroiled in a federal corruption trial as he ran for reelection to the Senate. He was initially found guilty and eight days later was narrowly defeated at the polls. Stevens was the most senior U.S. Senator to have ever lost a reelection bid. However, prior to Stevens's sentencing, the indictment was dismissed – effectively vacating the conviction – when a Justice Department probe found evidence of gross prosecutorial misconduct. Many argued the prosecution was unfair and politically motivated.Stevens died on August 9, 2010, when a de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Otter he and several others were flying in crashed en route to a private fishing lodge.

USS Stevens

Two ships in the United States Navy have been named USS Stevens. The first was named in honor of Captain Thomas Holdup Stevens (1795–1841), and the second for both Capt. Stevens and his son, Rear Admiral Thomas H. Stevens, Jr. (1819–1896).

The first USS Stevens (DD-86) was a Wickes-class destroyer, launched in 1918 and struck in 1936.

The second USS Stevens (DD-479) was a Fletcher-class destroyer, launched in 1942 and struck in 1973.

United States ship naming conventions

United States ship naming conventions for the U.S. Navy were established by Congressional action at least as early as 1862. Title Thirteen, Chapter Six, of the United States Code, enacted in that year, reads, in part,

The vessels of the Navy shall be named by the Secretary of the Navy under direction of the President according to the following rule:

Sailing-vessels of the first class shall be named after the States of the Union, those of the second class after the rivers, those of the third class after the principal cities and towns and those of the fourth class as the President may direct.

Further clarification was made by executive order of President Theodore Roosevelt in 1907. However, elements had existed since before his time. If a ship is reclassified, for example a destroyer is converted to a mine layer, it retains its original name.

Flight I ships
Flight II ships
Flight IIA ships
Flight III ships

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