USS Shoup

USS Shoup (DDG-86) is an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer in the United States Navy. The ship is named for Medal of Honor recipient General David M. Shoup, the 22nd Commandant of the Marine Corps.

Construction, on the 36th destroyer of her class, began at the Northrop Grumman Ship Systems' Ingalls Operations on 10 November 1998. Shoup was the 16th ship of this class to be built at Ingalls Shipbuilding. Her keel was laid on 13 December 1999 and she was launched on 22 November 2000. Shoup sailed into the Gulf of Mexico for the first of her sea trials on 11 December 2001. The vessel was delivered to the Navy by Northrop Grumman on 18 February 2002 and departed Pascagoula, Mississippi on 22 April 2002. Shoup was commissioned on 22 June 2002 at Port Terminal 37 in Seattle, Washington.

USS Shoup (DDG-86)
US Navy 011211-N-0000X-007 The Arleigh Burke (Flight III) class guided missile Destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86)
USS Shoup (DDG-86) during trials in the Gulf of Mexico in 2001
History
United States of America
Name: USS Shoup
Namesake: General David M. Shoup
Awarded: 13 December 1996
Builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Mississippi
Laid down: 13 December 1999
Launched: 22 November 2000
Commissioned: 22 June 2002
Homeport: Naval Base San Diego, California
Identification:
Motto: Victoria Per Perseverantiam Venit ("Through Perseverance Comes Victory")
Status: in active service
Badge: USS Shoup DDG-86 Crest
General characteristics
Class and type: Arleigh Burke-class destroyer
Displacement: 9,200 tons
Length: 509 ft 6 in (155.30 m)
Beam: 66 ft (20 m)
Draft: 31 ft (9.4 m)
Propulsion: 4 × General Electric LM2500-30 gas turbines, 2 shafts, 100,000 shp (75,000 kW)
Speed: exceeds 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph)
Complement: 310 officers and enlisted
Armament:
Aircraft carried: 2 × MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopters

History

USS Shoup 20060417
Shoup in the South China Sea, April 2006
DDG-86 portland
Shoup in Portland, Oregon for the Rose Festival Fleet Week, June 2009

2000s

In July 2002, she successfully conducted the US Navy's operational evaluation of the RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile with two test firings.[1]

In January 2005, she participated in Operation Unified Assistance.

On 9 May 2008, while operating with Combined Task Force 150, Shoup assisted a disabled dhow named Dunia by towing the vessel from the Gulf of Aden to Mukalla, Yemen.[2]

2010s

On 1 August 2010 the ship collided with a civilian vessel off Oceanside, California. The hull of the 21-foot (6.4 m) civilian boat was cracked, but no injuries were reported. Shoup was not damaged.[3]

Shoup provided assistance to South Korean naval forces after their recapture of the chemical tanker Samho Jewelry on 21 January 2011 in the Arabian Sea. The tanker's captain had been shot by pirates holding the vessel and a helicopter from Shoup was used to evacuate him in order for him to receive medical treatment for his injuries.

During her 2013 deployment to the Persian Gulf and Red Sea, Shoup participated in numerous multinational exercises while providing theater security and support of ongoing maritime stability in the region.[4] Shoup returned to homeport on 18 November 2013 following several extensions during what was the longest deployment for a US Navy destroyer since World War II at 313 days.[5]

In 2017 Shoup deployed to the Persian Gulf and Arabian Sea as a member of the USS Nimitz Carrier Strike Group. Making port visits to India, Bahrain and Oman. Also, she participated in Tri carrier operations in the Sea of Japan in support of a visit by the U.S. President the region.

On 25 July 2018, Shoup participated in Valiant Shield 2018 and Oceanic Maritime Security Operations in the South Pacific. Making port visits to Guam, Fiji and American Samoa.

Coat of arms

Shield

The shield has background of blue with a red chevron center. Featured in the chevron are artillery shells and a reversed gold start with a lion center. A large combined anchor with a trident center cover the shield.

The traditional Navy colors were chosen for the shield because dark blue and gold represents the sea and excellence respectively. The combined trident and anchor, symbols of sea prowess, represent our naval history and the evolvement of modern warfare systems. The tridents three tines denote the warfare areas: air, surface, and undersea warfare. The red chevron with artillery shells represents valor and sacrifice, suggesting the troops led by Colonel Shoup crossing the reefs of Betio and bombardment of enemy fire. The red lion exemplifies courage and strength symbolizing Colonel Shoup’s British Distinguished Service Order award for the battle at Betio. The reversed gold star refers to Colonel Shoup’s Medal of Honor awarded for his heroism as commander of the Second Marine Division at Betio and the disputed island of Tarawa Atoll.

Crest

The crest consists of the Marine Corps emblem surrounded by laurels.

The Marine Corps emblem reflects Commandant Shoup’s World War II war service and career as Commandant of the Marine Corps highlighting leadership and guidance. The surrounding laurels characterize achievement and honor.

Motto

The motto is written on a scroll of gold that has a red reverse side.

The ships motto is "Victoria per Perseverantiam Venit" or "Through Perseverance Comes Victory". The motto is a reference to both the honorable feats of Colonel Shoup and the Medal of Honor he received.

Seal

The coat of arms in full color as in the blazon, upon a white background enclosed within a dark blue oval border edged on the outside with a gold rope and bearing the inscription "USS Shoup" at the top and "DDG 86" in the base all gold.

References

This article includes information collected from the Naval Vessel Register, which, as a U.S. government publication, is in the public domain.

  1. ^ "ESSM completes OPEVAL with 'flying colors'", Seapower, May 2003. Archived 7 December 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Erickson, Elisabeth; Gutierrez, Chris (8 May 2008). "USS Shoup Tows Disabled Dhow to Safety". United States Navy. Retrieved 16 October 2015.
  3. ^ Perry, Tony (3 August 2010). "Navy Ship And Boat Collide". Los Angeles Times. pp. AA5.
  4. ^ http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/archives/2013/12/10/the-shirt-grabbing-assault-that-got-a-cmc-fired/78544180/
  5. ^ Fiege, Gale (18 November 2013). "USS Shoup returns after long deployment". The Herald. Retrieved 16 October 2015.

External links

Carrier Strike Group 11

Carrier Strike Group 11 (CSG-11 or CARSTRKGRU 11) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. Carrier strike groups gain and maintain sea control as well as project naval airpower ashore.The aircraft carrier Nimitz is the strike group's current flagship. Other units currently assigned to the group include the cruisers Lake Erie and Princeton, and Destroyer Squadron 9.Between 2006 and 2013, the group made four deployments to the U.S. Fifth Fleet operating in the Persian Gulf and North Arabian Sea, as well as a surge deployment with the U.S. Seventh Fleet in the western Pacific Ocean. The group participated in bilateral exercises Malabar 2005 and Malabar 2005, Key Resolve/Foal Eagle 2008, as well as joint exercise Valiant Shield 2007.

Carrier Strike Group 9

Carrier Strike Group 9 (CSG-9 or CARSTRKGRU 9) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. Carrier strike groups gain and maintain sea control as well as project naval airpower ashore.It is currently assigned to the U.S. Pacific Fleet. The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) is the group's current flagship. Other group units include Carrier Air Wing Seventeen, the Ticonderoga-class cruisers USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and USS Cape St. George (CG-71), and Destroyer Squadron 23.The strike group traces its history to Cruiser-Destroyer Group 3, created on 30 June 1973 by the re-designation of Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla 11. From 2004 the strike group has made multiple Middle East deployments providing air forces over Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as conducting Maritime Security Operations. The strike group received the Humanitarian Service Medal in recognition of its disaster relief efforts in Indonesia during Operation Unified Assistance in 2004–05.

Carrier Strike Group Nine 2004–09 operations

Carrier Strike Group Nine is a U.S. Navy formation. The group is one of six U.S. Navy carrier strike groups assigned to the U.S. Pacific Fleet. In 2004–09, it was based at Naval Base San Diego and its flagship was the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72).

The group's operations between 2004–2009 included three Western Pacific deployments in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, the War in Iraq, and the War in Afghanistan, as well as providing support for regional Maritime Security Operations. Additionally, the group also participated in the major military exercises RSOI/Foal Eagle 2006, Valiant Shield, and RIMPAC 2006, as well as Operation Unified Assistance, the U.S. military response to the aftermath of the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. In recognition of its disaster-relief mission to Indonesia, the group received the Humanitarian Service Medal.

During this period, the group was the second carrier strike group to be commanded by a former nuclear submarine commanding officer. It was also the first strike group to deploy with an entire Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System (LAMPS) helicopter squadron embarked, with individual air detachments operating from its escort ships and supported by the carrier's aviation facilities. The carrier strike group's 2007 pre-deployment Composite Unit Training Exercise included Mobile Security Squadron 2, and Helicopter Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (HVBSS) Team 1, a highly specialized boarding party, which was a first for West Coast-based ships.

David M. Shoup

David Monroe Shoup (30 December 1904 – 13 January 1983) was a general of the United States Marine Corps who was awarded the Medal of Honor in World War II, served as the 22nd Commandant of the Marine Corps, and, after retiring, became one of the most prominent critics of the Vietnam War.

Born in Indiana to an impoverished family, Shoup joined the military for financial reasons. Rising through the ranks in the interwar era, he was twice deployed to China during the Chinese Civil War. He served in Iceland at the beginning of U.S. involvement in World War II, and as a staff officer during the Pacific War. He was unexpectedly given command of the 2nd Marines, and led the initial invasion of Tarawa, for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor and the British Distinguished Service Order. He served in the Marianas campaign, and later became a high-level military logistics officer.

Solidifying his reputation as a hard-driving and assertive leader, Shoup rose through the senior leadership of the Marine Corps, overhauling fiscal affairs, logistics, and recruit training. He was selected as commandant by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and later served in the administration of John F. Kennedy. He reformed the Corps, emphasizing combat readiness and fiscal efficiency, against what was perceived as politicking among its officers.

Shoup opposed the military escalation in response to events such as the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Bay of Pigs invasion, but his strongest opposition was to U.S. involvement in South Vietnam. His opposition grew in strength after he retired from the military in 1963; he was hostile to both the strategy of the conflict and the excessive influence of corporations and military officials upon foreign policy. His high-profile criticism later spread to include the military industrial complex and what he saw as a pervasive militarism in American culture. Historians consider Shoup's statements opposing the war to be among the most pointed and high-profile leveled by a veteran against the Vietnam War.

Destroyer squadron

A destroyer squadron is a naval squadron or flotilla usually consisting of destroyers rather than other types of vessel. In some navies other vessels, such as frigates, may be included. In English the word "squadron" tends to be used for larger and "flotilla" for smaller vessels; both may be used for destroyer units. Similar formations are used in non-English-speaking countries, e.g., the "escadrille"—which would translate directly as "squadron"—in France.

Exercise RIMPAC

RIMPAC, the Rim of the Pacific Exercise, is the world's largest international maritime warfare exercise. RIMPAC is held biennially during June and July of even-numbered years from Honolulu, Hawaii. It is hosted and administered by the United States Navy's Indo-Pacific Command, headquartered at Pearl Harbor, in conjunction with the Marine Corps, the Coast Guard, and Hawaii National Guard forces under the control of the Governor of Hawaii. The US invites military forces from the Pacific Rim and beyond to participate. With RIMPAC the United States Indo-Pacific Command seeks to enhance interoperability among Pacific Rim armed forces, as a means of promoting stability in the region to the benefit of all participating nations. It is described by the US Navy as a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans.

Exercise Valiant Shield

Exercise Valiant Shield is one of the largest United States military war games held in the Pacific Ocean. Until 2018, there have been seven Valiant Shield exercises since 2006. According to the Navy, Valiant Shield focuses on cooperation between military branches and on the detection, tracking, and engagement of units at sea, in the air, and on land in response to a wide range of missions.The first exercise in 2006 involved 22,000 personnel, 280 aircraft, and 30 ships, including the supercarriers USS Kitty Hawk, USS Abraham Lincoln, and USS Ronald Reagan. It was the largest military exercise to be conducted by the United States in Pacific waters since the Vietnam War, and it was also the first time observers from the People's Republic of China were allowed to view U.S. wargames. The exercise marked the first of what will become biennial exercises involving different branches of the U.S. military.

Valiant Shield 2006 included Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard units. Air operations included thousands of sorties as well as in-air refuelings and parachute deployments. Aircraft from Valiant Shield deployed on missions ranging across the Pacific all the way to Alaska. Ships simulated anti-submarine warfare. Valiant Shield 2006 was the first time that three carrier strike groups had operated together in the Pacific in over ten years. Forces exercised a wide range of skills, including maritime interdiction; defense counter-air; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and command and control.

Great White Fleet in Albany, Western Australia in 1908

The Great White Fleet (also known as the American Fleet) in Albany, Western Australia was the visit of the American naval fleet in late 1908 on its tour around the world.

Guided missile destroyer

A guided-missile destroyer is a destroyer designed to launch guided missiles. Many are also equipped to carry out anti-submarine, anti-air, and anti-surface operations. The NATO standard designation for these vessels is DDG. Nations vary in their use of destroyer D designation in their hull pennant numbering, either prefixing or dropping it altogether. The U.S. Navy has adopted the classification DDG in the American hull classification system.

In addition to the guns, a guided-missile destroyer is usually equipped with two large missile magazines, usually in vertical-launch cells. Some guided-missile destroyers contain powerful radar systems, such as the United States’ Aegis Combat System, and may be adopted for use in an anti-missile or ballistic-missile defense role. This is especially true of navies that no longer operate cruisers, so other vessels must be adopted to fill in the gap.

HSM-77 Saberhawks

Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron Seven Seven (HSM-77) "Saberhawks" is a United States Navy helicopter squadron based at Naval Air Facility, Atsugi, Japan. HSM-77 is attached to Carrier Air Wing Five and deploys aboard USS Ronald Reagan and air capable ships attached to Carrier Strike Group Five (CSG-5). The squadron was established as Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron (Light) Forty Seven (HSL-47) on 25 September 1987 and was redesignated HSM-77 on 2 Apr 2009.

Ingalls Shipbuilding

Ingalls Shipbuilding is a shipyard located in Pascagoula, Mississippi, United States, originally established in 1938, and now part of Huntington Ingalls Industries. It is a leading producer of ships for the United States Navy, and at 12,500 employees, the second largest private employer in Mississippi with WalMart being the largest with 24,000 employees.

List of current ships of the United States Navy

The United States Navy has approximately 490 ships in both active service and the reserve fleet, with approximately 90 more in either the planning and ordering stages or under construction, according to the Naval Vessel Register and published reports. This list includes ships that are owned and leased by the U.S. Navy; ships that are formally commissioned, by way of ceremony, and non-commissioned. Ships denoted with the prefix "USS" are commissioned ships. Prior to commissioning, ships may be described as a "pre-commissioning unit" or PCU, but are officially referred to by name with no prefix. US Navy support ships are often non-commissioned ships organized and operated by Military Sealift Command. Among these support ships, those denoted "USNS" are owned by the US Navy. Those denoted by "MV" or "SS" are chartered.

Current ships include commissioned warships that are in active service, as well as ships that are part of Military Sealift Command, the support component and the Ready Reserve Force, that while non-commissioned, are still part of the effective force of the U.S. Navy. Future ships listed are those that are in the planning stages, or are currently under construction, from having its keel laid to fitting out and final sea trials.

There exist a number of former US Navy ships which are museum ships (not listed here), some of which may be US government-owned. One of these, USS Constitution, a three-masted tall ship, is one of the original six frigates of the United States Navy. It is the oldest naval vessel afloat, and still retains its commission (and hence is listed here), as a special commemoration for that ship alone.

List of equipment of the United States Navy

The Equipment of the United States Navy have been subdivided into: watercraft, aircraft, munitions, vehicles, and small arms.

Malabar (naval exercise)

Exercise Malabar is a trilateral naval exercise involving the United States, Japan and India as permanent partners. Originally begun in 1992 as a bilateral exercise between India and the United States, Japan became a permanent partner in 2015. Past non-permanent participants are Australia and Singapore. The annual Malabar series began in 1992 and includes diverse activities, ranging from fighter combat operations from aircraft carriers through Maritime Interdiction Operations Exercises.

Operation Dawn of Gulf of Aden

Operation Dawn of Gulf of Aden (Korean: 아덴만 여명 작전) was a naval operation by the Republic of Korea Navy against Somali pirates in the Arabian Sea. The operation was spurred by the pirates' seizure of the South Korean chemical tanker Samho Jewelry. In response, the South Korean government sent a destroyer and 30 naval commandos to retake the ship and rescue its crew. After trailing the tanker for several days and fighting a preliminary engagement that neutralized four of the pirates, the South Korean forces retook the ship by force on January 21, 2011 in a successful boarding action that resulted in the death of eight and the capture of five out of thirteen pirates.

RIM-162 ESSM

The RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM) is a development of the RIM-7 Sea Sparrow missile used to protect ships from attacking missiles and aircraft. ESSM is designed to counter supersonic maneuvering anti-ship missiles. ESSM also has the ability to be "quad-packed" in the Mark 41 Vertical Launch System, allowing up to four ESSMs to be carried in a single cell.

Shoup

Shoup may refer to:

Shoup (surname), a list of people

Shoup, Idaho, United States, an unincorporated community

Shoup Rock Shelters, two prehistoric rock shelters in Lemhi County, Idaho

USS Shoup, a United States Navy guided-missile destroyer in commission since 2002

USNS Sgt. Curtis F. Shoup (T-AG-175), a coastal freighter

Shoup's Mountain Battery, a Confederate Civil War unit

Shoup Voting Machine Corporation

Shoup Building, Salmon, Idaho, United States, on the National Register of Historic Places

USS Nimitz

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) is a supercarrier of the United States Navy, and the lead ship of her class. One of the largest warships in the world, she was laid down, launched, and commissioned as CVAN-68, "aircraft carrier, attack, nuclear powered", but she was later redesignated as CVN-68, "aircraft carrier, multi-mission, nuclear-powered", on 30 June 1975, as part of a fleet-wide realignment that year.

The ship was named for World War II Pacific fleet commander Chester W. Nimitz, USN, (1885–1966), who was the Navy’s third fleet admiral. Nimitz had her homeport at Naval Station Norfolk until 1987, when she was relocated to Naval Station Bremerton in Washington (now part of Naval Base Kitsap). Following her Refueling and Complex Overhaul in 2001, her home port was changed to Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego County, California. The home port of Nimitz was again moved to Naval Station Everett in Washington in 2012.

In January 2015, Nimitz changed home port from Everett back to Naval Base Kitsap.

With the inactivation of USS Enterprise in 2012 and decommissioning in 2017, Nimitz is now the oldest U.S. aircraft carrier in service.

Flight I ships
Flight II ships
Flight IIA ships
Flight III ships

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