USS Milius

USS Milius (DDG-69) is an Arleigh Burke-class Aegis guided missile destroyer of the United States Navy. Her namesake is Commander Paul L. Milius (1928-1968) of U.S. Navy squadron VO-67. His OP-2E aircraft, callsign Sophomore 50, was hit by anti-aircraft fire over Laos on 27 February 1968 and he ordered his crew to bail out. Seven of the nine men aboard were rescued. The remains of the eighth crewmember, ATN2 John Hartzeim, who was wounded in the attack, were identified on 19 February 1999. Although he exited his aircraft, Commander Milius was never recovered. Commander Milius received the Navy Cross in 1968.

USS Milius
Milius at sea in 2003
History
United States
Name: USS Milius
Namesake: Commander Paul L. Milius
Ordered: 8 April 1992
Builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding
Laid down: 8 August 1994
Launched: 1 August 1995
Sponsored by: Annette Milius
Christened: 28 October 1995
Commissioned: 23 November 1996
Homeport: Naval Base Yokosuka, Japan[1]
Motto: Alii Prae Me - "Others Before Me"
Status: in active service
Badge: USS Milius DDG-69 Crest
General characteristics
Class and type: Arleigh Burke-class destroyer
Displacement:
  • Light: approx. 6,800 long tons (6,900 t)
  • Full: approx. 8,900 long tons (9,000 t)
Length: 505 ft (154 m)
Beam: 66 ft (20 m)
Draft: 31 ft (9.4 m)
Propulsion: 4 General Electric LM2500-30 gas turbines, two shafts, 100,000 total shaft horsepower (75 MW)
Speed: >30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph)
Range:
Complement:
Sensors and
processing systems:
Electronic warfare
& decoys:
Armament:
Aircraft carried: 2 Sikorsky MH-60R helicopters can be embarked

Ships history

USS Milius DDG69
USS Milius, May 2007

In January 2005, Milius participated in Operation Unified Assistance. On 6 December 2006, the ship successfully launched a Block IV Tomahawk cruise missile for the first time in a test of the Block IV configuration. The launch took place in the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division Sea Test Range off of California. The missile flew 869 miles before impacting its target on the land range at China Lake, California.[2]

On 12 September 2007, the Embassy of the United States, Manila stated that the arrival of the destroyers USS Chung-Hoon and USS Milius was a goodwill visit to strengthen Philippines–United States relations.[3]

USSMilius-SanDiego-1
USS Milius in San Diego bay, February 7, 2017

Deployments

  • 26 May 1998-September 1998 Maiden deployment
  • 22 June 2000-December 2000 West Pac-Indian Ocean-Persian Gulf
  • 2 November 2002 – 2 June 2003 West Pac-Indian Ocean-Persian Gulf
  • 6 December 2004 – 6 June 2005 West Pac-Indian Ocean-Persian Gulf
  • 10 April 2007 – 8 October 2007 Scheduled Deployment with BHR ESG
  • December 2008-July 2009 West Pac-Indian Ocean-Persian Gulf
  • 18 May 2010 – 16 December 2010 West Pac-Indian Ocean-Persian Gulf
  • 11 January 2012 – 11 September 2012 West Pac-Indian Ocean-Persian Gulf
  • 20 October 2014 - 25 June 2015 West PAC- Indian Ocean-Persian Gulf

Awards

USS Milius has been awarded the Navy Battle "E" three times

Ship awards

Ribbon Description Notes
Battle Effectiveness Award ribbon, 3rd award Navy "E" Ribbon with three Battle E devices
National Defense Service Medal ribbon National Defense Service Medal
Ribbon of the GWTEM Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
Ribbon of the GWTSM Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
Silver star
Navy and Marine Corps Sea Service Deployment Ribbon
Navy Sea Service Deployment Ribbon with one silver service star

References

This article includes information collected from the Naval Vessel Register, which, as a U.S. government publication, is in the public domain.

  1. ^ "USS Milius Bids Farewell to San Diego and Begins Transit to Japan". public.navy.mil. Retrieved 23 April 2018.
  2. ^ "Navy posts successful test of Raytheon's Block IV Tomahawk cruise missile", Aerotech News and Review, 2006-12-22
  3. ^ Inquirer.net, US warships arrive in RP Archived 2007-09-14 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ [1]

External links

Adam Housley

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The sorority was founded at the University of Minnesota in 1989 by a group of women who had formerly been affiliated with the Sisters of Triangle Fraternity program. Alpha Sigma Kappa became a national organization in 1996 and currently consists of twelve Active chapters, six Alumnae chapters and two Colonies. The sorority is not affiliated with any national Greek council; however, some individual chapters are affiliated with their local Panhellenic organizations.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyer

The Arleigh Burke class of guided missile destroyers (DDGs) is a United States Navy class of destroyer built around the Aegis Combat System and the SPY-1D multifunction passive electronically scanned array radar. The class is named for Admiral Arleigh Burke, an American destroyer officer in World War II, and later Chief of Naval Operations. The class leader, USS Arleigh Burke, was commissioned during Admiral Burke's lifetime.

These warships were designed as multimission destroyers, able to fulfill the strategic land strike role with Tomahawk missiles; antiaircraft warfare (AAW) role with powerful Aegis radar and surface-to-air missiles; antisubmarine warfare (ASW) with towed sonar array, anti-submarine rockets, and ASW helicopter; and antisurface warfare (ASuW) with Harpoon missile launcher. With upgrades to their AN/SPY-1 phased radar systems and their associated missile payloads as part of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense System, the ships of this class have also begun to demonstrate some promise as mobile antiballistic missile and anti-satellite weaponry platforms. Some versions of the class no longer have the towed sonar, or Harpoon missile launcher. Their hull and superstructure were designed to have a reduced radar cross-section.The first ship of the class was commissioned on 4 July 1991. With the decommissioning of the last Spruance-class destroyer, USS Cushing, on 21 September 2005, the Arleigh Burke-class ships became the U.S. Navy's only active destroyers, until the Zumwalt class became active in 2016. The Arleigh Burke class has the longest production run for any post-World War II U.S. Navy surface combatant. Besides the 62 vessels of this class (comprising 21 of Flight I, 7 of Flight II and 34 of Flight IIA) in service by 2016, up to a further 42 (of Flight III) have been envisioned.

With an overall length of 505 to 509 feet (154 to 155 m), displacement ranging from 8,315 to 9,200 tons, and weaponry including over 90 missiles, the Arleigh Burke class are larger and more heavily armed than most previous ships classified as guided missile cruisers.

Destroyer Squadron 15

Destroyer Squadron 15 is a squadron of United States Navy Arleigh Burke-class destroyers based at Yokosuka, Japan.

Guided missile destroyer

A guided-missile destroyer is a destroyer designed to launch guided missiles. Many are also equipped to carry out anti-submarine, anti-air, and anti-surface operations. The NATO standard designation for these vessels is DDG. Nations vary in their use of destroyer D designation in their hull pennant numbering, either prefixing or dropping it altogether. The U.S. Navy has adopted the classification DDG in the American hull classification system.

In addition to the guns, a guided-missile destroyer is usually equipped with two large missile magazines, usually in vertical-launch cells. Some guided-missile destroyers contain powerful radar systems, such as the United States’ Aegis Combat System, and may be adopted for use in an anti-missile or ballistic-missile defense role. This is especially true of navies that no longer operate cruisers, so other vessels must be adopted to fill in the gap.

Individual augmentee

An Individual augmentee is a United States military member attached to a unit (battalion or company) as a temporary duty assignment (TAD/TDY). Individual Augmentees can be used to fill shortages or can be used when an individual with specialized knowledge or skill sets is required. As a result, Individual Augmentees can include members from an entirely different branch of service. The system was used extensively in the Iraq War, though with some criticism. By early 2007, there were an average of approximately 12,000 Navy personnel filling Army jobs in the United States, Iraq, Afghanistan, Cuba and the Horn of Africa at any one time.

Ingalls Shipbuilding

Ingalls Shipbuilding is a shipyard located in Pascagoula, Mississippi, United States, originally established in 1938, and now part of Huntington Ingalls Industries. It is a leading producer of ships for the United States Navy, and at 12,500 employees, the second largest private employer in Mississippi with WalMart being the largest with 24,000 employees.

Killed in action

Killed in action (KIA) is a casualty classification generally used by militaries to describe the deaths of their own combatants at the hands of hostile forces. The United States Department of Defense, for example, says that those declared KIA need not have fired their weapons but have been killed due to hostile attack. "KIAs" include those killed by friendly fire in the midst of combat, but not from incidents such as accidental vehicle crashes, murder and other "non-hostile" events or terrorism. KIA can be applied both to front-line combat troops and to naval, air and support troops. Someone who is killed in action during a particular event is denoted with a † (dagger) beside their name to signify their death in that event or events.

Further, KIA denotes one to have been killed in action on the battlefield whereas died of wounds (DOW) relates to someone who survived to reach a medical treatment facility. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) also uses DWRIA, rather than DOW, for "died of wounds received in action". However, historically, militaries and historians have used the former acronym.

PKIA means "presumed killed in action" This term is used when personnel are lost in battle, initially listed MIA, but after not being found, are later presumed to have not survived.

List of current ships of the United States Navy

The United States Navy has approximately 490 ships in both active service and the reserve fleet, with approximately 90 more in either the planning and ordering stages or under construction, according to the Naval Vessel Register and published reports. This list includes ships that are owned and leased by the U.S. Navy; ships that are formally commissioned, by way of ceremony, and non-commissioned. Ships denoted with the prefix "USS" are commissioned ships. Prior to commissioning, ships may be described as a "pre-commissioning unit" or PCU, but are officially referred to by name with no prefix. US Navy support ships are often non-commissioned ships organized and operated by Military Sealift Command. Among these support ships, those denoted "USNS" are owned by the US Navy. Those denoted by "MV" or "SS" are chartered.

Current ships include commissioned warships that are in active service, as well as ships that are part of Military Sealift Command, the support component and the Ready Reserve Force, that while non-commissioned, are still part of the effective force of the U.S. Navy. Future ships listed are those that are in the planning stages, or are currently under construction, from having its keel laid to fitting out and final sea trials.

There exist a number of former US Navy ships which are museum ships (not listed here), some of which may be US government-owned. One of these, USS Constitution, a three-masted tall ship, is one of the original six frigates of the United States Navy. It is the oldest naval vessel afloat, and still retains its commission (and hence is listed here), as a special commemoration for that ship alone.

List of destroyers of the United States Navy

This is a list of destroyers of the United States Navy, sorted by hull number. It includes all of the series DD, DL, DDG, DLG, and DLGN.

CG-47 Ticonderoga and CG-48 Yorktown were approved as destroyers (DDG-47 and DDG-48) and redesignated cruisers before being laid down; it is uncertain whether CG-49 Vincennes and CG-50 Valley Forge were ever authorized as destroyers by the United States Congress (though the fact that the DDG sequence resumes with DDG-51 Arleigh Burke argues that they were).

List of equipment of the United States Navy

The Equipment of the United States Navy have been subdivided into: watercraft, aircraft, munitions, vehicles, and small arms.

Marjorie Sterrett Battleship Fund Award

The Marjorie Sterrett Battleship Fund Award is presented annually by the U.S. Navy's Chief of Naval Operations to one ship in the U.S. Atlantic Fleet and one in the U.S. Pacific Fleet. A list of winners appears at the end of this article.

Generally the recipient is the ship with the highest score in the fleet's annual competitions for Battle Efficiency Awards, and is therefore often thought of as the fleet's most battle-ready ship. This isn't strictly correct, because it has been the policy to rotate eligibility for the award annually among the various type commands (aircraft carriers, submarines, amphibious ships, etc.).

The award includes a small monetary stipend (about $500 in 2004). Commanding officers receiving the award must put the money into the ship's recreation fund, where it can be spent on athletic equipment, prizes for athletic or marksmanship competitions, recreation room furniture, dances, parties, and similar recreational activities.

Milius

Milius may refer to:

USS Milius (DDG-69), missile destroyer of the United States Navy

Pope Avilius of Alexandria, also known as Milius, Patriarch of Alexandria between 83 and 95

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Trial of Joseph Estrada

The trial of Philippine president Joseph Estrada (People of the Philippines v. Joseph Estrada, et al., 26558 Sandiganbayan, September 12, 2007) took place between 2001 and 2007 at the Sandiganbayan. Estrada, popularly called Erap, was ousted from office in 2001 during a popular uprising in Metro Manila after an aborted impeachment trial in which he was charged with plunder and perjury. Soon after his ouster, the same charges were filed against him at the Sandiganbayan.

After a lengthy trial, the Sandiganbayan ruled Estrada not guilty of perjury while ruling him as guilty of plunder and sentenced him to reclusión perpetua. All of his co-accused were acquitted.

USS John C. Stennis

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United States Fleet Activities Yokosuka

United States Fleet Activities Yokosuka (横須賀海軍施設, Yokosuka kaigunshisetsu) or Commander Fleet Activities Yokosuka (司令官艦隊活動横須賀, Shirei-kan kantai katsudō Yokosuka) is a United States Navy base in Yokosuka, Japan. Its mission is to maintain and operate base facilities for the logistic, recreational, administrative support and service of the U.S. Naval Forces Japan, Seventh Fleet and other operating forces assigned in the Western Pacific. CFAY is the largest strategically important U.S. naval installation in the western Pacific.Fleet Activities Yokosuka comprises 2.3 km² (568 acres) and is located at the entrance of Tokyo Bay, 65 km (40 mi) south of Tokyo and approximately 30 km (20 mi) south of Yokohama on the Miura Peninsula in the Kantō region of the Pacific Coast in Central Honshū, Japan.

The 55 tenant commands which make up this installation support U.S. Navy Pacific operating forces, including principal afloat elements of the United States Seventh Fleet, including the only permanently forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), the group she heads, Carrier Strike Group Five, and Destroyer Squadron 15.

VO-67

Observation Squadron 67 (VO-67) was a clandestine United States Navy military intelligence aircraft squadron based in Thailand during the Vietnam War. Created in February 1967, the unit was deactivated in July 1968. During its period of activity, the squadron mainly flew missions over the Ho Chi Minh trail in Vietnam and Laos under the MUSCLE SHOALS mission known as Operation Igloo White, deploying electronic sensory devices from their aircraft. These sensors, known as the Air-Delivered Seismic Intrusion Detector (ADSID) and the Acoustic Seismic Intrusion Detector (ACOUSID), which would implant in the ground to detect North Vietnamese Army and Viet Cong supply movements along the trail.

The squadron flew OP-2E Neptune aircraft, a modification of the P-2E Neptune maritime patrol and antisubmarine warfare aircraft. Three unit aircraft were lost on combat missions with a total of 20 men killed. The unit received the Navy Unit Commendation and, in May 2008, was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for its highly classified missions and for its intense aerial support of the Marines during the Battle of Khe Sanh.The Arleigh Burke class destroyer, USS Milius (DDG-69) is named for Commander Paul L. Milius, USN, who received the Navy Cross for saving his seven-man crew while serving with VO-67. Commander Milius was lost in combat over the Ho Chi Minh Trail when his OP-2E aircraft, callsign Sophomore 50, was hit by anti-aircraft fire over Laos on 27 February 1968 and he ordered his crew to bail out. Seven of the nine men aboard were rescued. The remains of the eighth crewmember, ATN2 John Hartzheim, were identified on 19 February 1999. Although he exited his aircraft, Commander Milius was never seen again. He was listed as Missing in Action, presumed Killed in Action, and his remains never recovered.

Flight I ships
Flight II ships
Flight IIA ships
Flight III ships

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