USS John Basilone

USS John Basilone (DDG-122) is a planned United States Navy Arleigh Burke-class Flight IIA guided missile destroyer, the 72nd overall for the class. The ship will be named for United States Marine Corps Gunnery sergeant John Basilone, who received the nation's highest military award for valor, the Medal of Honor, for heroism during the Guadalcanal Campaign in World War II.[1] Basilone was the only enlisted Marine to receive both the Medal of Honor and the Navy Cross in World War II.[1]

This is the second United States Navy vessel to be named after Basilone.[1] The first, USS Basilone (DD-824), was a Gearing-class destroyer commissioned in 1949 and decommissioned in 1977.

USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) steams through the Mediterranean Sea
History
United States
Name: USS John Basilone
Namesake: John Basilone
Awarded: 3 June 2013
Builder: Bath Iron Works
Status: Authorized
General characteristics
Class and type: Arleigh Burke-class destroyer
Displacement: 9,200 long tons (9,300 t)
Length: 510 ft (160 m)
Draft: 33 ft (10 m)
Propulsion: 4 × General Electric LM2500-30 gas turbines, 2 shafts, 100,000 shp (75 MW)
Complement: 380 officers and enlisted
Armament:
Aircraft carried: 2 × SH-60 Sea Hawk helicopters
Aviation facilities: Flight deck, Hangar bay

References

  1. ^ a b c "Secretary Mabus Names Destroyer for Medal of Honor Recipient" (Press release). Navy News Service. 16 August 2016. NNS160816-15. Retrieved 25 August 2016.
Bath Iron Works

Bath Iron Works (BIW) is a major United States shipyard located on the Kennebec River in Bath, Maine, founded in 1884 as Bath Iron Works, Limited. BIW has built private, commercial, and military vessels, most of which have been ordered by the United States Navy. The shipyard has built and sometimes designed battleships, frigates, cruisers, and destroyers, including the Arleigh Burke class which are currently among the world's most advanced surface warships.

Since 1995, Bath Iron Works has been a subsidiary of General Dynamics, the fifth-largest defense contractor in the world as of 2008. During World War II, ships built at BIW were considered to be of superior toughness by sailors and Navy officials, giving rise to the phrase "Bath-built is best-built."

Guided missile destroyer

A guided-missile destroyer is a destroyer designed to launch guided missiles. Many are also equipped to carry out anti-submarine, anti-air, and anti-surface operations. The NATO standard designation for these vessels is DDG. Nations vary in their use of destroyer D designation in their hull pennant numbering, either prefixing or dropping it altogether. The U.S. Navy has adopted the classification DDG in the American hull classification system.

In addition to the guns, a guided-missile destroyer is usually equipped with two large missile magazines, usually in vertical-launch cells. Some guided-missile destroyers contain powerful radar systems, such as the United States’ Aegis Combat System, and may be adopted for use in an anti-missile or ballistic-missile defense role. This is especially true of navies that no longer operate cruisers, so other vessels must be adopted to fill in the gap.

John Basilone

John Basilone (November 4, 1916 – February 19, 1945) was a United States Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant who was killed in action during World War II. He received the Medal of Honor for heroism above and beyond the call of duty during the Battle for Henderson Field in the Guadalcanal Campaign, and the Navy Cross posthumously for extraordinary heroism during the Battle of Iwo Jima. He was the only enlisted Marine to receive both of these decorations in World War II.

He enlisted in the Marine Corps on June 3, 1940, after serving three years in the United States Army with duty in the Philippines. He was deployed to Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and in August 1942, he took part in the invasion of Guadalcanal. In October, he and two other Marines used machine guns to hold off an attack by a far numerically superior Japanese force. In February 1945, he was killed in action on the first day of the invasion of Iwo Jima, after he single-handedly destroyed an enemy blockhouse and led a Marine tank under fire safely through a minefield.

He has received many honors including being the namesake for streets, military locations, and two United States Navy destroyers.

Flight I ships
Flight II ships
Flight IIA ships
Flight III ships

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