UPI College Football Player of the Year

The United Press International College Football Player of the Year Award was among the first and most recognized college football awards. With the second bankruptcy of UPI in 1991, along with that of its parent company, the award was discontinued. Offensive and defensive players were eligible. Unlike the Heisman, it was never affiliated with a civic organization or named after a player (like the Walter Camp Award). Like all UPI college awards at the time, it was based on the votes of NCAA coaches. Billy Cannon, O.J. Simpson, and Archie Griffin are the only two-time winners.[1][2][3]

UPI Player of the year
Given forThe Most Outstanding Offensive or Defensive College Football Player of the Year
CountryUnited States
Presented byUnited Press International
History
First award1950
Final award1991

Yearly winners

1950Vic Janowicz, Ohio State
1951Dick Kazmaier, Princeton
1952Billy Vessels, Oklahoma
1953Paul Giel, Minnesota
1954Alan Ameche, Wisconsin
1955Howard Cassady, Ohio State
1956Johnny Majors, Tennessee
1957John David Crow, Texas A&M
1958Billy Cannon, LSU
1959—Billy Cannon, LSU
1960Joe Bellino, Navy
1961Bob Ferguson, Ohio State
1962Terry Baker, Oregon State
1963Roger Staubach, Navy
1964John Huarte, Notre Dame
1965Mike Garrett, USC
1966Steve Spurrier, Florida
1967O. J. Simpson, USC
1968—O. J. Simpson, USC
1969Steve Owens, Oklahoma
1970Jim Plunkett, Stanford
1971Ed Marinaro, Cornell
1972Johnny Rodgers, Nebraska
1973John Cappelletti, Penn State
1974Archie Griffin, Ohio State
1975—Archie Griffin, Ohio State
1976Tony Dorsett, Pittsburgh
1977Earl Campbell, Texas
1978Billy Sims, Oklahoma
1979Charles White, USC
1980Hugh Green, Pittsburgh
1981Marcus Allen, USC
1982Herschel Walker, Georgia
1983Mike Rozier, Nebraska
1984Doug Flutie, Boston College
1985Bo Jackson, Auburn
1986Vinny Testaverde, Miami (Fla.)
1987Tim Brown, Notre Dame
1988Barry Sanders, Oklahoma State
1989Andre Ware, Houston
1990Ty Detmer, BYU
1991Desmond Howard, Michigan

References

  1. ^ Los Angeles Times, December 12, 1962.
  2. ^ Deseret News, December 18, 1990
  3. ^ Deseret News, December 18, 1991
1980 College Football All-America Team

The 1980 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1980.

The NCAA recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1980 season. They are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), and (4) the United Press International (UPI). The AP, UPI, and FWAA teams were selected by polling of sports writers and/or broadcasters. The AFCA team was based on a poll of coaches. Other notable selectors, though not recognized by the NCAA as official, included Football News, a national weekly football publication, the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).Fourteen players were unanimous picks by all four official selectors. Seven of the unanimous picks were offensive players: (1) South Carolina running back and 1980 Heisman Trophy winner, George Rogers; (2) Georgia running back and 1982 Heisman Trophy winner, Herschel Walker; (3) Purdue quarterback and 1980 Sammy Baugh Trophy winner, Mark Hermann; (4) Stanford wide receiver Ken Margerum; (5) Purdue tight end Dave Young; (6) Pittsburgh tackle Mark May; and (7) Notre Dame center John Scully. The seven unanimous picks on the defensive side were: (1) Pittsburgh defensive end Hugh Green, who won the 1980 Walter Camp Award, Maxwell Award, Lombardi Award, and Sporting News and UPI College Football Player of the Year awards; (2) Alabama defensive end E.J. Junior; (3) Houston defensive tackle Leonard Mitchell; (4) Baylor linebacker Mike Singletary; (5) North Carolina linebacker Lawrence Taylor; (6) UCLA defensive back Kenny Easley; and (7) USC defensive back Ronnie Lott.

In 1989, The New York Times published a follow-up on the 1980 AP All-America team. The article reported that 20 of the 22 first-team players went on to play in the NFL, with 13 still active and eight having received All-Pro honors.

Alan Ameche

Alan Ameche (; June 1, 1933 – August 8, 1988), nicknamed "The Iron Horse", or simply "The Horse", was an American football player who played six seasons with the Baltimore Colts in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and won the Heisman Trophy during his senior season in 1954. He was elected to the Pro Bowl in each of his first four seasons in the league. He is famous for scoring the winning touchdown in overtime in the 1958 NFL Championship Game against the New York Giants, labeled "The Greatest Game Ever Played."

With colleague and former Colts teammate Gino Marchetti, Ameche founded the Gino's Hamburgers chain. He also founded the Baltimore-based Ameche's Drive-in restaurants.

Andre Ware

Andre Ware (born July 31, 1968) is an American sports analyst and commentator and a former American football player. He was the 1989 Heisman Trophy winner as a quarterback for the University of Houston. He was the first African American quarterback to receive this honor. In the 1990 NFL Draft, Ware was the first round selection (#7 overall) of the Detroit Lions. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2004.

Archie Griffin

Archie Mason Griffin (born August 21, 1954) is a former American football running back. Griffin played seven seasons in the NFL with the Cincinnati Bengals. He is college football's only two-time Heisman Trophy winner. Griffin won four Big Ten Conference titles with the Ohio State Buckeyes and was the first player ever to start in four Rose Bowls.

Billy Vessels

Billy Dale Vessels (March 22, 1931 – November 17, 2001) was a gridiron football player. He played college football at the University of Oklahoma and won the Heisman Trophy in 1952. Vessels went on to play professional football with the National Football League's Baltimore Colts and the Western Interprovincial Football Union's Edmonton Eskimos.

Bob Ferguson (American football)

Robert Eugene "Bob" Ferguson (August 29, 1939 – December 30, 2004) was an American football fullback. He played college football at Ohio State University, where he won the Maxwell Award in 1961. Ferguson then played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) with the Pittsburgh Steelers and Minnesota Vikings. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1996.

Charles White (American football)

Charles Raymond White (born January 22, 1958) is a former professional American football player who was a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons during the 1980s.

He played college football for the University of Southern California, where he was an All-American and the winner of the Heisman Trophy. A first-round pick (27th overall) in the 1980 NFL Draft, he played professionally for the Cleveland Browns and the Los Angeles Rams of the NFL.

Ed Marinaro

Ed Marinaro (born March 31, 1950) is a former American football player and actor. In 1971, he finished as a runner-up to Pat Sullivan for the Heisman Trophy, and from 2010–2011 starred in the football comedy series, Blue Mountain State. He is also known as a regular cast member on Hill Street Blues, playing Officer Joe Coffey for five seasons (1981–1986).

Howard Cassady

Howard Albert "Hopalong" Cassady (born March 2, 1934) is a former professional American football running back. He won the Heisman Trophy in 1955, and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1979. He played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for eight seasons, seven of them for the Detroit Lions, with whom he won the 1957 NFL Championship game.

John Cappelletti

John Cappelletti (born August 9, 1952) is a former American football running back. He played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) with the Los Angeles Rams and the San Diego Chargers.

Prior to his professional career, he attended Penn State, where he won the Heisman Trophy in 1973. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1993. Penn State football coach Joe Paterno said that Cappelletti was "the best football player I ever coached." Cappelletti's relationship with his younger brother Joey, who was stricken with leukemia, was chronicled into a book and made-for-TV movie.

John Huarte

John Gregory Huarte (born April 6, 1944) is a former American football quarterback. He played college football at the University of Notre Dame for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team and won the 1964 Heisman Trophy. He then played professionally with a number of teams in the American Football League (AFL), the National Football League (NFL), and in the World Football League (WFL) between 1965 and 1975. Huarte was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2005.

Johnny Rodgers

Johnny Steven Rodgers (born July 5, 1951) is an American former gridiron football player. He played college football at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, where he won the Heisman Trophy in 1972. Rodgers played professionally in the Canadian Football League (CFL) with the Montreal Alouettes and in the National Football League (NFL) with the San Diego Chargers. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2000.

Maxwell Award

The Maxwell Award is presented annually to the college football player judged by a panel of sportscasters, sportswriters, and National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches and the membership of the Maxwell Football Club to be the best all-around in the United States. The award is named after Robert "Tiny" Maxwell, a Swarthmore College football player, coach and sportswriter. Johnny Lattner (1952, 1953) and Tim Tebow (2007, 2008) are the only players to have won the award twice. It is the college equivalent of the Bert Bell Award of the National Football League, also given out by the Maxwell Club.

Oregon State Beavers football

The Oregon State Beavers football team represents Oregon State University in NCAA Division I FBS college football. The team first fielded an organized football team in 1893 and is a member of the Pac-12 Conference's North Division. Jonathan Smith has been the head coach since November 29, 2017. Their home games are played at Reser Stadium in Corvallis, Oregon.

Sporting News College Football Player of the Year

The Sporting News College Football Player of the Year award is given to the player of the year in college football as adjudged by Sporting News.

Steve Owens (American football)

Loren Everett "Steve" Owens (born December 9, 1947) is a former football player, a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for five seasons in the early 1970s.

Owens played college football for the University of Oklahoma, and was the 1969 Heisman Trophy winner and an All-American. He was selected in the first round of the 1970 NFL draft by the Detroit Lions, 19th overall, and became the first Lion to rush for over a thousand yards in a season.

Terry Baker

Terry Wayne Baker (born May 5, 1941) is a former American football and basketball player. He played college football and college basketball at the Oregon State University. He played as a quarterback for the Oregon State Beavers football team from 1960 to 1962, winning the Heisman Trophy as senior. In the spring of his senior year, he played in the Final Four of the 1963 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament with the Oregon State Beavers men's basketball team. To date, he is the only athlete to win a Heisman Trophy and play in the Final Four. Baker was the first overall pick in the 1963 NFL draft and played with the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL) from 1963 to 1965. He then played for one season in the Canadian Football League (CFL) with the Edmonton Eskimos in 1967. Baker was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1982.

Vic Janowicz

Victor Felix "Vic" Janowicz (February 26, 1930 – February 27, 1996) was an American football halfback in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins. He played college football at Ohio State University and was drafted in the seventh round of the 1952 NFL Draft. Janowicz was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1976.

Walter Camp Award

The Walter Camp Player of the Year Award is given annually to the collegiate American football player of the year, as decided by a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I FBS head coaches and sports information directors under the auspices of the Walter Camp Football Foundation; the award is named for Walter Camp, an important and influential figure in the development of the sport. Three players have won the award twice: Colt McCoy of the University of Texas in 2008 and 2009, Archie Griffin of Ohio State in 1974 and 1975, and O. J. Simpson of USC in 1967 and 1968.

Overall trophies
Overall media awards
Positional awards
Other national player awards
All-Americans
Head coaching awards
Assistant coaching awards
Conference awards
Division I FCS awards
Other divisions/associations
Academic, inspirational,
and versatility awards
Service awards
Regional awards
Awards organizations
Halls of fame

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