UEFA Women's Euro 2017 Final

The UEFA Women's Euro 2017 Final was a football match to determine the winner of UEFA Women's Euro 2017. The match took place on 6 August 2017 at De Grolsch Veste in Enschede, Netherlands,[6] and was contested by the winners of the semi-finals, the Netherlands and Denmark.

The Netherlands won the final 4–2 for their first UEFA Women's Championship title.[7][8]

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 Final
Grolsch Veste wedstrijd
De Grolsch Veste in Enschede hosted the final.
EventUEFA Women's Euro 2017
Netherlands Denmark
Netherlands Denmark
4 2
Date6 August 2017
VenueDe Grolsch Veste, Enschede
Player of the MatchSherida Spitse (Netherlands)[1]
RefereeEsther Staubli (Switzerland)[2]
Attendance28,182[3]
WeatherPartly cloudy
20 °C (68 °F)
44% humidity[4][5]

Background

Both the Netherlands and Denmark reached the UEFA Women's Championship final for the first time in their histories. For the first time since 1993, a country other than Germany won the competition. Apart from Germany, only two other countries have won the championship: Norway and Sweden. Norway was defeated by both the Netherlands and Denmark in the preliminary round whereas Sweden was defeated by the Netherlands in the quarter-finals.[9]

The finalists met each other in the group stage of the tournament, with the Netherlands winning 1–0 via a penalty from Sherida Spitse.

Route to the final

Netherlands Round Denmark
Opponents Result Group stage Opponents Result
 Norway 1–0 Match 1  Belgium 1–0
 Denmark 1–0 Match 2  Netherlands 0–1
 Belgium 2–1 Match 3  Norway 1–0
Group A winner
Pos Team Pld Pts
1  Netherlands (H) 3 9
2  Denmark 3 6
3  Belgium 3 3
4  Norway 3 0
Source: UEFA
(H) Host.
Final standings Group A runner-up
Pos Team Pld Pts
1  Netherlands (H) 3 9
2  Denmark 3 6
3  Belgium 3 3
4  Norway 3 0
Source: UEFA
(H) Host.
Opponents Result Knockout stage Opponents Result
 Sweden 2–0 Quarter-finals  Germany 2–1
 England 3–0 Semi-finals  Austria 0–0 (a.e.t.) (3–0 p)

Match

Details

Netherlands 4–2 Denmark
Report
Netherlands[10]
Denmark[10]
GK 1 Sari van Veenendaal
RB 2 Desiree van Lunteren Substituted off 57'
CB 6 Anouk Dekker Yellow card 43'
CB 3 Stefanie van der Gragt Yellow card 72'
LB 5 Kika van Es Substituted off 90+4'
CM 14 Jackie Groenen Yellow card 21'
CM 10 Daniëlle van de Donk
CM 8 Sherida Spitse (c)
RF 7 Shanice van de Sanden Substituted off 90'
CF 9 Vivianne Miedema
LF 11 Lieke Martens
Substitutions:
DF 20 Dominique Janssen Substituted in 57'
FW 13 Renate Jansen Substituted in 90'
DF 4 Mandy van den Berg Substituted in 90+4'
Manager:
Sarina Wiegman
NED-DEN (women) 2017-08-06
GK 1 Stina Lykke Petersen
RB 8 Theresa Nielsen
CB 5 Simone Boye Sørensen Substituted off 77'
CB 12 Stine Larsen
LB 19 Cecilie Sandvej
RM 7 Sanne Troelsgaard Nielsen
CM 4 Maja Kildemoes Substituted off 61'
CM 13 Sofie Junge Pedersen Substituted off 82'
LM 11 Katrine Veje
CF 10 Pernille Harder (c)
CF 9 Nadia Nadim Yellow card 45'
Substitutions:
DF 15 Frederikke Thøgersen Substituted in 61'
DF 2 Line Røddik Hansen Substituted in 77'
MF 6 Nanna Christiansen Substituted in 82'
Manager:
Nils Nielsen

Player of the Match:
Sherida Spitse (Netherlands)[1]

Assistant referees:[2]
Belinda Brem (Switzerland)
Sanja Rodjak Karšić (Croatia)
Fourth official:
Bibiana Steinhaus (Germany)
Fifth official:
Katrin Rafalski (Germany)

Match rules[11]

  • 90 minutes.
  • 30 minutes of extra time if necessary.
  • Penalty shoot-out if scores still level.
  • Maximum of three substitutions, with a fourth allowed in extra time.

Statistics

Statistic[12] Netherlands Denmark
Goals scored 4 2
Total shots 10 11
Shots on target 7 4
Saves 1 2
Ball possession 50% 50%
Corner kicks 0 4
Fouls committed 16 10
Offsides 0 2
Yellow cards 3 1
Red cards 0 0

References

  1. ^ a b "Every player of the match at Women's EURO". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 August 2017. Retrieved 6 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Esther Staubli to referee UEFA Women's EURO 2017 final". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 4 August 2017. Retrieved 4 August 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Netherlands vs. Denmark - 6 August 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. 6 August 2017. Retrieved 6 August 2017.
  4. ^ "UEFA Women's EURO - Netherlands-Denmark - Match info". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 August 2017. Retrieved 6 August 2017.
  5. ^ "Weather History for Twenthe, Netherlands". Weather Underground. The Weather Company. 6 August 2017. Retrieved 6 August 2017.
  6. ^ "UEFA Women's Euro 2017 Match Schedule" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. November 2016. Retrieved 15 June 2017.
  7. ^ "Dutch delight: how the Netherlands won Women's EURO". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 August 2017. Retrieved 6 August 2017.
  8. ^ "UEFA Women's Euro 2017 – Final: Full-time report" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 August 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2018.
  9. ^ "UEFA Women's Euro 2017 – Final: Match press kits" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 August 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2018.
  10. ^ a b "UEFA Women's Euro 2017 – Final: Line-ups" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 August 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2018.
  11. ^ "Regulations of the UEFA European Women's Championship, 2015–17" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 2017. Retrieved 15 June 2017.
  12. ^ "UEFA Women's EURO - Netherlands-Denmark - Statistics". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 August 2017. Retrieved 6 August 2017.

External links

2017 FA Community Shield

The 2017 FA Community Shield (also known as The FA Community Shield supported by McDonald's for sponsorship reasons) was the 95th FA Community Shield, an annual football match played between the winners of the previous season's Premier League and FA Cup competitions. It was held at Wembley Stadium on 6 August 2017. The match was played between Chelsea, champions of the 2016–17 Premier League and Arsenal, who beat their opponents to win the 2017 FA Cup Final. Watched by a crowd of 83,325, Arsenal won the Shield 4–1 on penalties, after the match finished 1–1 after 90 minutes. The shoot-out was notable as the ABBA system was trialled for the first time in English football; the format sees teams take back-to-back penalties rather than alternating.

This was Arsenal's 22nd Shield appearance to Chelsea's 12th. For Arsenal, Alexandre Lacazette made his competitive debut, while Olivier Giroud and Theo Walcott started as substitutes. Their squad did not include Alexis Sánchez, Laurent Koscielny and Mesut Özil – all absent for differing reasons. Midfielder Cesc Fàbregas started against his former team, playing alongside N'Golo Kanté. New signings Álvaro Morata, Antonio Rüdiger and Willy Caballero were all named on the bench. Striker Diego Costa was omitted from the Chelsea squad as he did not feature in manager Antonio Conte's pre-season preparations.

After a subdued first half, Chelsea took the lead in the 46th minute when Victor Moses scored. A late challenge by Pedro on Mohamed Elneny resulted in the Chelsea attacker being shown a red card; from the free-kick Arsenal were awarded, substitute Sead Kolašinac scored on his debut. As there were no further goals, the match was decided by a penalty shoot-out. Thibaut Courtois and Morata missed their penalties, leaving Giroud to score the winning one.

Sports broadcasting contracts in Japan

This article refers to sports broadcasting contracts in Japan. For a list of rights in other countries, see Sports television broadcast contracts.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017

The 2017 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2017, was the 12th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. The competition was expanded to 16 teams (from 12 teams in the previous edition).The Netherlands were declared as hosts by the UEFA Executive Committee on 4 December 2014.Germany's 22-year reign as champions of Europe was ended after losing 1–2 to Denmark in the quarter-finals. In addition it was only Germany's second loss in the finals since 1993. Another former winner, Norway, lost to both finalists, the Netherlands and Denmark, and ended without goals or points.

The Netherlands won their first ever title by beating fellow first time finalists, Denmark, 4–2 in the final.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 knockout stage

The knockout phase of UEFA Women's Euro 2017 began on 29 July 2017 and ended on 6 August 2017 with the final.All times local (UTC+2).

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying

The UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying competition was a women's football competition that determined the 15 teams joining the automatically qualified hosts Netherlands in the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 final tournament.A total of 46 UEFA member national teams, with Andorra entering for the first time at senior women's level, entered the qualifying competition.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying

The UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition is a women's football competition that will determine the 15 teams joining the automatically qualified hosts England in the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 final tournament.Apart from England, 47 of the remaining 54 UEFA member national teams entered the qualifying competition, including Cyprus which entered for the first time at senior women's level, and Kosovo which entered their first Women's Euro.

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