UEFA Women's Euro 2021

The 2021 UEFA Women's Championship will be the 13th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. It will be the second edition since it was expanded to 16 teams. The championship will be held in England from 11 July–1 August 2021, with the final to take place at the Wembley Stadium. England last hosted the tournament in 2005, the last edition featuring eight teams.[1][2]

The Netherlands are the defending champions.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021
Tournament details
Host countryEngland
Dates11 July – 1 August 2021
Teams16 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)9 (in 8 host cities)

Host selection

England was the only country to submit a bid before the deadline.[3]

England were confirmed as hosts at the UEFA Executive Committee meeting in Dublin, Republic of Ireland on 3 December 2018.[4][2][1]

Qualification

A total of 48 UEFA nations entered the competition (including Cyprus which entered for the first time at senior women's level, and Kosovo which entered their first Women's Euro), and with the hosts England qualifying automatically, the other 47 teams will compete in the qualifying competition to determine the remaining 15 spots in the final tournament.[5] Different from previous qualifying competitions, the preliminary round has been abolished and all entrants start from the qualifying group stage. The qualifying competition consists of two rounds:[6]

  • Qualifying group stage: The 47 teams are drawn into nine groups: two groups of six teams and seven groups of five teams. Each group is played in home-and-away round-robin format. The nine group winners and the three best runners-up (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualify directly for the final tournament, while the remaining six runners-up advance to the play-offs.
  • Play-offs: The six teams are drawn into three ties to play home-and-away two-legged matches to determine the last three qualified teams.

The draw for the qualifying group stage was held on 21 February 2019 in Nyon.[7][1] The qualifying group stage will take place from August 2019 to September 2020, while the play-offs will take place in October 2020.[6][1]

Qualified teams

The following teams qualified for the final tournament.

Team Method of
qualification
Date of
qualification
Finals
appearance
Last
appearance
Previous best
performance
FIFA ranking
at start of event
 England Hosts 3 December 2018 9th 2017 Runners-up (1984, 2009)

The final tournament draw will take place at the 02 arena on 22 January 2021.

Venues

The following stadiums will host matches in the tournament:[8]

Meadow Lane in Nottingham and London Road in Peterborough were initially included on the list of stadiums when the Football Association submitted the bid to host the tournament. These were changed with the City Ground in Nottingham and St Mary's in Southampton due to UEFA requirements.[9][10] The City Ground was replaced by Leigh Sports Village when the final list of venues was confirmed in August 2019.[8]

London Brentford Wigan and Leigh Manchester
Wembley Stadium Brentford Community Stadium Leigh Sports Village Manchester City Academy Stadium
Capacity: 90,000 Capacity: 17,250 Capacity: 12,000 Capacity: 7,000
Wembley Stadium interior LeighStadium-May2008 Academy Stadium 02
Sheffield
Bramall Lane
Capacity: 32,702
Bramall lane1
Rotherham Milton Keynes Southampton Brighton and Hove
New York Stadium Stadium MK St Mary's Stadium Brighton Community Stadium
Capacity: 12,021 Capacity: 30,500 Capacity: 32,505 Capacity: 30,750
The New York Stadium Stadium MK St Mary's Stadium (cropped) Falmer Stadium - night

See also

Broadcasting

References

  1. ^ a b c d "England to host UEFA Women's EURO 2021". UEFA. 3 December 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Women's Euro 2021: England named hosts of European Championship". BBC Sport. 3 December 2018.
  3. ^ "England only applicant to host European Women's Championship in 2021". BBC Sport. 31 August 2018. Retrieved 31 August 2018.
  4. ^ "UEFA Executive Committee agenda for Dublin meeting". UEFA.com. 16 November 2018.
  5. ^ "Seedings for the Women's EURO 2021 qualifying draw". UEFA.com. 20 December 2018.
  6. ^ a b "Regulations of the UEFA European Women's Championship, 2019–21" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  7. ^ "2018/19 UEFA Women's calendar" (PDF). UEFA.
  8. ^ a b "Euro 2021: Nine venues selected for finals tournament in England". The FA. 20 August 2019.
  9. ^ "FA bids to host UEFA Women's Euro 2021". The Football Association. 29 August 2018.
  10. ^ "England to stage UEFA Women's Euro 2021". The Football Association. 3 December 2018.

External links

2019–20 in French football

The following article is a summary of the 2019–20 football season in France, which is the 86th season of competitive football in the country and runs from July 2019 to June 2020.

2019–20 in German football

The 2019–20 season is the 110th season of competitive football in Germany.

2019–20 in Italian football

The 2019–20 season is the 118th season of competitive football in Italy.

Cyprus women's national football team

The Cyprus women's national football team represents Cyprus in international women's football.

Kosovo women's national football team

The Kosovo women's national football team (Albanian: Kombëtarja e futbollit të femrave të Kosovës, Serbian: Женска фудбалска репрезентација Косова/Ženska fudbalska reprezentacija Kosova) represents Kosovo in international women's football and is controlled by the Football Federation of Kosovo.

Netherlands women's national football team

The Netherlands women's national football team (Dutch: Nederlands vrouwenvoetbalelftal) is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

In 1971, the team played the first women's international football match recognized by FIFA against France. They have played at the final tournament of the 2009, 2013, and 2017 UEFA Women's Championship and were champions in 2017. They have played at the final tournament of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time, and reached thirteenth place. They have also played at the final tournament in the 2019 edition, losing 2-0 the final against the United States.

The nicknames for the team are Oranje (Orange) and Leeuwinnen (Lionesses). Sarina Wiegman has been head coach since January 2017. As of July 2019, the team is ranked number 3 in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Romania women's national football team

The Romania women's national football team represents Romania in international women's football. Their most recent competition is qualification for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. Despite not gaining as much success as the men's, the women's team has been improving greatly, and almost qualified for UEFA Women's Euro and FIFA Women's World Cup. The rise of women's team is the chance for Romania to become the first Balkan nation to play on an international competitions, and become the first nation to have both men and women's teams participating in both tournaments. The only rival for them in the Balkans, is Serbia, as Serbian women's team had almost qualified for a major tournament recently.

Sancaktepe Stadium

Sancaktepe Stadium (Turkish: Sancaktepe 15 Temmuz Şehitler Stadı) is a football stadium in Sancaktepe suburb of Istanbul, Turkey.

Scotland women's national football team

The Scotland women's national football team represents Scotland in international women's football competitions. Since 1998, the team has been governed by the Scottish Football Association (SFA). Scotland qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time in 2019, and qualified for their first UEFA Women's Euro in 2017. As of July 2019, the team was 22nd in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying

The UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition is a women's football competition that will determine the 15 teams joining the automatically qualified hosts England in the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 final tournament.Apart from England, 47 of the remaining 54 UEFA member national teams entered the qualifying competition, including Cyprus which entered for the first time at senior women's level, and Kosovo which entered their first Women's Euro.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying Group A

Group A of the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition consists of six teams: Netherlands, Russia, Slovenia, Turkey, Kosovo, and Estonia. The composition of the nine groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 21 February 2019, 13:30 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

The group is played in home-and-away round-robin format between August 2019 and September 2020. The group winners and the three best runners-up among all nine groups (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualify directly for the final tournament, while the remaining six runners-up advance to the play-offs.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying Group B

Group B of the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition consists of six teams: Italy, Denmark, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Israel, Malta, and Georgia. The composition of the nine groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 21 February 2019, 13:30 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

The group is played in home-and-away round-robin format between August 2019 and September 2020. The group winners and the three best runners-up among all nine groups (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualify directly for the final tournament, while the remaining six runners-up advance to the play-offs.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying Group C

Group C of the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition consists of five teams: Norway, Wales, Belarus, Northern Ireland, and Faroe Islands. The composition of the nine groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 21 February 2019, 13:30 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

The group is played in home-and-away round-robin format between August 2019 and September 2020. The group winners and the three best runners-up among all nine groups (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualify directly for the final tournament, while the remaining six runners-up advance to the play-offs.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying Group D

Group D of the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition consists of five teams: Spain, Czech Republic, Poland, Moldova, and Azerbaijan. The composition of the nine groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 21 February 2019, 13:30 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

The group is played in home-and-away round-robin format between August 2019 and September 2020. The group winners and the three best runners-up among all nine groups (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualify directly for the final tournament, while the remaining six runners-up advance to the play-offs.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying Group E

Group E of the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition consists of five teams: Scotland, Finland, Portugal, Albania, and Cyprus. The composition of the nine groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 21 February 2019, 13:30 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

The group is played in home-and-away round-robin format between August 2019 and September 2020. The group winners and the three best runners-up among all nine groups (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualify directly for the final tournament, while the remaining six runners-up advance to the play-offs.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying Group F

Group F of the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition consists of five teams: Sweden, Iceland, Hungary, Slovakia, and Latvia. The composition of the nine groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 21 February 2019, 13:30 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

The group is played in home-and-away round-robin format between August 2019 and September 2020. The group winners and the three best runners-up among all nine groups (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualify directly for the final tournament, while the remaining six runners-up advance to the play-offs.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying Group G

Group G of the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition consists of five teams: France, Austria, Serbia, Kazakhstan, and Macedonia. The composition of the nine groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 21 February 2019, 13:30 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

The group is played in home-and-away round-robin format between August 2019 and September 2020. The group winners and the three best runners-up among all nine groups (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualify directly for the final tournament, while the remaining six runners-up advance to the play-offs.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying Group H

Group H of the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition consists of five teams: Switzerland, Belgium, Romania, Croatia, and Lithuania. The composition of the nine groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 21 February 2019, 13:30 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

The group is played in home-and-away round-robin format between August 2019 and September 2020. The group winners and the three best runners-up among all nine groups (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualify directly for the final tournament, while the remaining six runners-up advance to the play-offs.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying Group I

Group I of the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition consists of five teams: Germany, Ukraine, Republic of Ireland, Greece, and Montenegro. The composition of the nine groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 21 February 2019, 13:30 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

The group is played in home-and-away round-robin format between August 2019 and September 2020. The group winners and the three best runners-up among all nine groups (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualify directly for the final tournament, while the remaining six runners-up advance to the play-offs.

Tournaments
Qualification
Finals
Squads

Languages

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